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#257839 - 06/09/13 05:57 AM Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013
Scoutgal Offline
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Registered: 01/23/01
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Welcome to Reader Rant

Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013




In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened that day by resolution of the Second Continental Congress in 1777. The United States Army also celebrates the Army Birthday on this date; Congress adopted "the American continental army" after reaching a consensus position in the Committee of the Whole on June 14, 1775.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day; in August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.

SOURCE



The national flag of the United States of America, often simply referred to as the American flag, consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton (referred to specifically as the "union") bearing fifty small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars (top and bottom) alternating with rows of five stars. The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 states of the United States of America and the 13 stripes represent the thirteen British colonies that declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain and became the first states in the Union. Nicknames for the flag include the "Stars and Stripes", "Old Glory", and "The Star-Spangled Banner."

SOURCE



The modern meaning of the flag was forged in December 1860 when Major Robert Anderson, acting without orders, moved the U.S. garrison from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, in defiance of the power of the new Confederate States of America. Adam Goodheart argues this was the opening move of the Civil War, and the flag was used throughout the North to symbolize American nationalism and rejection of secessionism.

Before that day, the flag had served mostly as a military ensign or a convenient marking of American territory, flown from forts, embassies, and ships, and displayed on special occasions like the Fourth of July. But in the weeks after Major Anderson's surprising stand, it became something different. Suddenly the Stars and Stripes flew—as it does today, and especially as it did after the September 11 attacks in 2001—from houses, from storefronts, from churches; above the village greens and college quads. For the first time American flags were mass-produced rather than individually stitched and even so, manufacturers could not keep up with demand. As the long winter of 1861 turned into spring, that old flag meant something new. The abstraction of the Union cause was transfigured into a physical thing: strips of cloth that millions of people would fight for, and many thousands die for.

"U.S. Flag" - on the planet Mars - on the Curiosity rover (September 19, 2012).

The flag of the United States is one of the nation's most widely recognized symbols. Within the United States, flags are frequently displayed not only on public buildings but on private residences. The flag is a common motif on decals for car windows, and clothing ornaments such as badges and lapel pins. Throughout the world the flag has been used in public discourse to refer to the United States, not only as a nation, state, government, and set of policies, but also as a set of ideals[citation needed].

The flag has become a powerful symbol of Americanism, and is proudly flown on many occasions, with giant outdoor flags used by retail outlets to draw customers. Desecration of the flag is considered a public outrage, but remains protected as freedom of speech. In worldwide comparison, Testi (2010) notes that the United States is not unique in adoring its banner, for in Scandinavian countries their flags are also "beloved, domesticated, commercialized and sacralized objects".

SOURCE



The flag should never be allowed to touch the ground and, if flown at night, must be illuminated. If the edges become tattered through wear, the flag should be repaired or replaced. When a flag is so tattered that it can no longer serve as a symbol of the United States, it should be destroyed in a dignified manner, preferably by burning. The American Legion and other organizations regularly conduct flag retirement ceremonies, often on Flag Day, June 14. (The Boy Scouts of America recommends that modern nylon or polyester flags be recycled instead of burned, due to hazardous gases being produced when such materials are burned.)



Proper vertical display of flag


On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution which stated: "Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation."[66] Flag Day is now observed on June 14 of each year. While scholars still argue about this, tradition holds that the new flag was first hoisted in June 1777 by the Continental Army at the Middlebrook encampment.[67]
Francis Hopkinson's design for a US flag, featuring six-pointed stars arranged in rows.
FIAV historical.svg 13-star "Betsy Ross" variant

The 1777 resolution was most probably meant to define a naval ensign. In the late 18th century, the notion of national flag did not yet exist, or was only nascent. The flag resolution appears between other resolutions from the Marine Committee. On May 10, 1779, Secretary of the Board of War Richard Peters expressed concern "it is not yet settled what is the Standard of the United States."[68]

The Flag Resolution did not specify any particular arrangement, number of points, nor orientation for the stars. One famous arrangement features 13 outwardly-oriented five-pointed stars arranged in a circle, the so-called Betsy Ross flag. Although the Betsy Ross legend is controversial, the design is among the earliest 13-star flags. Popular designs at the time were varied and most were individually crafted rather than mass-produced. Examples of 13-star arrangements can be found on other flags attributed to Francis Hopkinson, the Cowpens flag, and the Brandywine flag. Given the scant archaeological and written evidence, it is unknown if one design was the most popular during the period.[citation needed]



A painting depicting 39 historical flags of the United States of America





Have a great week, Ranters! cool
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





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#257842 - 06/09/13 12:34 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Scoutgal]
logtroll Offline
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Registered: 04/26/10
Posts: 8580
Loc: New Mexico (not old Mexico)
Ah, yes... flags and patriotism. I seem to have lost the need,or desire, for either along the way. Whatever appeal the sense of comfort from tribalism brings is offset by the logically necessary requirement that there be "others". These conditions are all set by prejudice.
Quote:
The word prejudice refers to prejudgment: i.e. making a decision before becoming aware of the relevant facts of a case. In recent times, the word has come to be most often used to refer to preconceived, usually unfavorable, judgments toward people or a person because of gender, social class, age, disability, religion, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, nationality or other personal characteristics. In this case it refers to a positive or negative evaluation of another person based on their group membership.[1] Prejudice can also refer to unfounded beliefs[2] and may include "any unreasonable attitude that is unusually resistant to rational influence."[3] Gordon Allport defined prejudice as a "feeling, favorable or unfavorable, toward a person or thing, prior to, or not based on, actual experience."[4]


A couple of weeks ago was the annual meeting of the homeowner's association of a little mountain community where I have been building a cabin. Over the years the association came to be dominated by a small group of your standard NonCons, who believe vehemently in personal liberty and freedom from oppressive government (unless, of course, they are the government). About five years ago they decided that we must recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag at the beginning of the annual meetings. It was put to a vote among the ten members present and was passed 15 in favor to 7 opposed (did I mention that the NonCons had accumulated 12 proxies from the list of members, a list they refuse to share with the general membership?) To summarize, 7 members present at the meeting opposed adding the PoAttF, 3 voted "for", and 12 proxies voted "for". Ponder the interesting irony contained in that, if you wish.

But here's the funny - this year the meeting happened at the Little Toad Creek Inn instead of at the volunteer fire department station, and there was no flag anywhere to be seen. Did that stop our little tribe from performing its Patriotic Duty? (One neighbor was heard to say, "Where's the feckin' flag?) ROTFMOL

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"You can't fix a problem until you understand what the problem is." Logtroll

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#257846 - 06/09/13 01:47 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Scoutgal]
Joe Keegan Offline
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Registered: 12/25/05
Posts: 8707
Scoutgal, I thoroughly enjoyed the history, graphics, music, and proper protocol of the American flag that you presented- excellent job!

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#257849 - 06/09/13 03:40 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Joe Keegan]
Scoutgal Offline
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Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 27583
Loc: CA USA
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Scoutgal, I thoroughly enjoyed the history, graphics, music, and proper protocol of the American flag that you presented- excellent job!


Thank you, Joe! smile
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





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#257856 - 06/09/13 06:33 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Scoutgal]
Joe Keegan Offline
veteran

Registered: 12/25/05
Posts: 8707
You're welcome, Scoutgal.

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#257891 - 06/10/13 04:59 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Joe Keegan]
Joe Keegan Offline
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Registered: 12/25/05
Posts: 8707

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#257944 - 06/11/13 04:02 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Joe Keegan]
Scoutgal Offline
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Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 27583
Loc: CA USA
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan


ROTFMOL
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





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#257951 - 06/11/13 04:44 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Scoutgal]
Phil Hoskins Offline
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Registered: 06/07/04
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Loc: West Hollywood, CA
I am home from storm chasing and a visit to son and grandson. Back to work.

Did ya miss me smile
_________________________
Life is a banquet -- and most poor suckers are starving to death -- Auntie Mame
You are born naked and everything else is drag - RuPaul

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#257956 - 06/11/13 05:02 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Phil Hoskins]
Joe Keegan Offline
veteran

Registered: 12/25/05
Posts: 8707
Yes. Did you miss us?

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#257977 - 06/11/13 07:27 PM Re: Round Table For Week of June 9th-June 15th, 2013 [Re: Phil Hoskins]
SuZQ Offline
member

Registered: 08/13/04
Posts: 1472
Loc: Colorado
Quote:
I am home from storm chasing and a visit to son and grandson. Back to work.

Did ya miss me smile


Yes we did! Did you visit your son in Colorado (I seem to recall you mentioning you had a son that lived close by in Longmont, CO at one time.) If so, you escaped just before the temps spiked up here. It's supposed to hit 100 today...too hot for this kid. devil

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