Current Topics
the sins of sony and security
by jgw
1 second ago
Defense of the GOP
by Ardy
Today at 06:57 PM
Normalizing Cu ban Relations
by logtroll
Today at 06:20 PM
Round Table For The Month Of December, 2014
by Phil Hoskins
Today at 12:00 PM
Current case study: Oil and the Free Market
by NW Ponderer
Yesterday at 04:03 PM
Just a random thought that keeps circulating in my brain:
by NW Ponderer
12/17/14 10:42 AM
Graphic report on CIA interrogations, torture released by Senate panel
by Phil Hoskins
12/16/14 09:30 PM
Philip K. Dick would have been 86 today: Some thoughts on hi
by pondering_it_all
12/16/14 08:17 PM
Five GOP immigration myths
by pondering_it_all
12/15/14 03:12 PM
'Annie': Film Review
by pdx rick
12/15/14 12:19 AM
10 most dangerous jobs
by logtroll
12/14/14 02:36 PM
Miscellaneous humor thread
by Golem
12/14/14 01:23 PM
police shootings, killings
by jgw
12/13/14 03:20 PM
Cromnibus? Cronybus? Crimnibus?
by logtroll
12/12/14 09:49 AM
I think I might be Catholic...
by logtroll
12/12/14 03:03 AM
Forum Stats
6003 Members
55 Forums
14501 Topics
249002 Posts

Max Online: 282 @ 05/29/08 01:08 AM
Google Adsense
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
#271824 - 06/21/14 11:31 PM Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014
Scoutgal Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 26166
Loc: CA USA
Welcome toReader Rant Round Table for June 22 - 28, 2014

On June 22, 1944, one of the most important pieces of legislation in the history of the United States was signed into law: The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (P.L. 78-346, 58 Stat. 284m), known informally as the G.I. Bill. It was the last piece of legislation of FDR's "New Deal" and one of its most enduring legacies - it shaped the face of the nation as no other piece of legislation has before or since.


The GI bill was the result of one of the most painful lessons of WWI. After that conflict, veterans were demobilized with a thank you and $60. The Wilson administration had boosted the pay of civilian employees to adjust for inflation, but had not done so for the military. An effort was made to compensate servicemen, but by then Warren G. Harding was President, and he strongly opposed these efforts. Indeed, his position will sound familiar to many today. Initially his position was to "support the measure if it were coupled with a revenue measure" eventually opposing it unless it were a "future pension" plan. He was so opposed, in fact, that he appeared before the Senate to testify against it in 1921, and then vetoed the measure when it reached his desk in 1922. To say that his veto was unpopular would be a gross understatement. After Calvin Coolidge's election a new provision was negotiated (as Coolidge, too, refused to pay veterans anything in "cash"). On May 15, 1924, President Coolidge, too, vetoed a bill granting bonuses to veterans of World War I saying: "patriotism...bought and paid for is not patriotism." Wikepedia A very frustrated Congress finally overrode this veto, something that even his Republican colleagues couldn't stomach.

But the "World War Adjusted Compensation Act" didn't provide any current compensation, only an "adjusted service certificate," a promise of future payment - but not until 1945. With the Depression and widespread unemployment, this slight of veterans was a particularly bitter pill to swallow, and the result was - a march on Washington! The famous "Bonus Army"
Quote:
was the popular name of an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups—who gathered in Washington, D.C., in the spring and summer of 1932 to demand cash-payment redemption of their service certificates. Its organizers called it the Bonus Expeditionary Force to echo the name of World War I's American Expeditionary Forces, while the media called it the Bonus March. It was led by Walter W. Waters, a former Army sergeant.
Wikipedia - "Bonus Army"

Having lived through the Bonus Army march, having responsibility for millions of servicemembers who had served during a second grueling "World War" and having a predisposition to help his fellow Americans, FDR promoted a realistic compensation effort to support those who had served. Yet it still almost didn't come to pass. History and Timeline - VA
Quote:
Some shunned the idea of paying unemployed Veterans $20 a week because they thought it diminished their incentive to look for work. Others questioned the concept of sending battle-hardened Veterans to colleges and universities, a privilege then reserved for the rich.
Sound familiar?

The final version that Roosevelt signed into law contained three major provisions: unemployment compensation, VA home loan guarantees, and tuition reimbursement. Ironically, the unemployment compensation provision - the issue most bitterly fought in Congress - was the least exercised provision. Less than 20 percent of funds set aside for this were ever used.

The other two provisions, however, were lustily embraced by returning veterans (my father amongst them). In the peak year of 1947, Veterans accounted for 49 percent of college admissions. By the time the original GI Bill ended on July 25, 1956, 7.8 million of 16 million World War II Veterans had participated in an education or training program. From 1944 to 1952, VA backed nearly 2.4 million home loans for World War II Veterans.

The impact of these twin benefits profoundly changed the cultural landscape of the nation.
Quote:
By giving veterans money for tuition, living expenses, books, supplies and equipment, the G.I. Bill effectively transformed higher education in America. Before the war, college had been an option for only 10-15 percent of young Americans, and university campuses had become known as a haven for the most privileged classes. By 1947, in contrast, vets made up half of the nation's college enrollment; three years later, nearly 500,000 Americans graduated from college, compared with 160,000 in 1939.

As educational institutions opened their doors to this diverse new group of students, overcrowded classrooms and residences prompted widespread improvement and expansion of university facilities and teaching staffs. An array of new vocational courses were developed across the country, including advanced training in education, agriculture, commerce, mining and fishing--skills that had previously been taught only informally.
History.com Many famous Americans from Johnny Carson to Bob Dole to Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist Gene Hackman and Harry Bellefonte were GI Bill-educated. The entire NASA program was made possible because of the thousands of Engineers who were educated under the GI Bill. The GI Bill provided the education for 14 Nobel Prize winners, three Supreme Court justices, three presidents, a dozen senators, two dozen Pulitzer Prize winners. How the GI Bill changed the economyThe United States became one of the best educated workforces in history, and the economy showed it.

A second major impact was the housing boom that was inspired by those millions of GI bill backed loans. The landscape of America was literally transformed. Levittowns and suburbs grew exponentially, necessitating the creation of the Interstate Highway system and the automobiles to get from these new houses to workplaces, refrigerators, stoves, air conditioners and toys to fill them.


And, all of this prosperity led to the Baby Boom, including yours truly.
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





Top
#271825 - 06/21/14 11:33 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
Scoutgal Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 26166
Loc: CA USA
The above was posted by me for NW Ponderer! Excellent opener, NWP! ThumbsUp
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





Top
#271826 - 06/21/14 11:34 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
Scoutgal Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 26166
Loc: CA USA
The local news station was interviewing an 80-year-old lady because she had just gotten married for the fourth time. The interviewer asked her questions about her life, about what it felt like to be marrying again at 80, and then about her new husband's occupation.

"He's a funeral director," she answered. "Interesting," the newsman thought...

He then asked her if she wouldn't mind telling him a little about her first three husbands and what they did for a living.

She paused for a few moments, needing time to reflect on all those years. After a short time, a smile came to her face and she answered proudly, explaining that she had first married a banker when she was in her 20's, then a circus ringmaster when in her 40's, and a preacher when in her 60's, and now - in her 80's - a funeral director.

The interviewer looked at her, quite astonished, and asked why she had married four men with such diverse careers.

(Wait for it)

She smiled and explained, "I married one for the money, two for the show, three to get ready, and four to go."
(Oh, just hush-up)
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





Top
#271827 - 06/21/14 11:35 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
Scoutgal Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/23/01
Posts: 26166
Loc: CA USA
_________________________
milk and Girl Scout cookies ;-)

Save your breath-You may need it to blow up your date.





Top
#271837 - 06/22/14 05:04 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
NW Ponderer Offline
Moderator
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/09/11
Posts: 12048
I have been looking at some of the ripples and echoes of the GI Bill. Before WWII fewer than 10% of high school graduates went on to college. Now 34% continue on (a figure that would be higher if it weren't so expensive). How many of our parent's parents went to college? Before 1940 fewer than half of Americans owned their own homes. Today 67% of houses are owner-occupied, and that's in a population three times as large. The baby boom of the 50s and 60s echoed in a mini-boom of the 80s and 90s.

The GI Bill made many things possible, and changed expectations. How many of our children expect to go to college? How many think they'll buy their own home? How many appliances are taken for granted? Before WWII most homes didn't have garages, now how many don't? Every time I look, I find another connection.
_________________________
A well reasoned argument is like a diamond: impervious to corruption and crystal clear - and infinitely rarer.

Here, as elsewhere, people are outraged at what feels like a rigged game -- an economy that won't respond, a democracy that won't listen, and a financial sector that holds all the cards. - Robert Reich

Top
#271838 - 06/22/14 06:31 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: NW Ponderer]
Phil Hoskins Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/07/04
Posts: 20687
Loc: West Hollywood, CA
NWP, I like your thinking about the GI Bill, but have a problem with it being a way to continue the US being militarily adventurous. This is a way to make military service more appealing, and hence build the army needed for our adventures.

The same benefits could be extended to all who participate in the tax system. I believe the net economic effect would be positive and pay for itself over time.


Edited by Phil Hoskins (06/22/14 07:17 PM)
_________________________
Life is a banquet -- and most poor suckers are starving to death -- Auntie Mame
You are born naked and everything else is drag - RuPaul

Top
#271839 - 06/22/14 07:12 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
NW Ponderer Offline
Moderator
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/09/11
Posts: 12048
When I get back to my computer, I'll send you a link that makes just that argument. The GI bill was the impetus, but what it demonstrated is that when a governmenr invests in its citizens, amazing things happen.
_________________________
A well reasoned argument is like a diamond: impervious to corruption and crystal clear - and infinitely rarer.

Here, as elsewhere, people are outraged at what feels like a rigged game -- an economy that won't respond, a democracy that won't listen, and a financial sector that holds all the cards. - Robert Reich

Top
#271841 - 06/22/14 07:18 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: NW Ponderer]
Phil Hoskins Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/07/04
Posts: 20687
Loc: West Hollywood, CA
I look forward to that link. It seems to we are arguing over the peripherals of life and not getting at real discussions that look outside our prejudices and pat answers. That is why I dropped out in 1967 and have never fully dropped back in.
_________________________
Life is a banquet -- and most poor suckers are starving to death -- Auntie Mame
You are born naked and everything else is drag - RuPaul

Top
#271843 - 06/22/14 09:34 PM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Phil Hoskins]
Phil Hoskins Offline
Administrator
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/07/04
Posts: 20687
Loc: West Hollywood, CA
The US and most of the world could use some deep down healing. But I guess healing doesn't happen until one recognizes they are imperfect and what goes on in their mind is not necessarily true or valid.
_________________________
Life is a banquet -- and most poor suckers are starving to death -- Auntie Mame
You are born naked and everything else is drag - RuPaul

Top
#271847 - 06/23/14 12:50 AM Re: Round Table For Week Of June 22nd-June 28th, 2014 [Re: Scoutgal]
Ardy Online   content
veteran

Registered: 12/22/05
Posts: 11735
Loc: San Jose, Ca USA
A deep thought phil
_________________________

"Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts."

Top
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >

Who's Online
0 registered (), 21 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
xiawei, Marzman, kyleyoung8, Retread, solafeian
6003 Registered Users
A2