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#297883 - 01/04/17 10:25 PM The Doors’ Debut Is Still One of the Most Dangerous Albums Ever
Golem Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 03/12/12
Posts: 3528
Loc: Orange County, California, USA
John Kruth
Observer
January 4, 2017

Quote:
One glance at the cover of The Doors’ debut album and you knew the summer of love was over and the flower children were headed straight for the sanitarium. These Doors, as drummer John Densmore later quipped, were clearly “unhinged.”

Ray Manzarek carried the stern countenance of a Protestant preacher, hunched over the keyboard driving Jim Morrison into new, uncharted realms as he delivered psychedelic sermons. Manzarek’s studied glare behind his rimless glasses and stiff, formal appearance (preferring suits to the colorful ad-hoc hippie esthetic) gave him the air of a tidy yet maniacal schoolmaster while guitarist Robby Kreiger resembled a frazzled Venice Beach ragamuffin. And Densmore just seemed like that guy in high school you knew you had to keep away from your little sister. Well, they all did, but none more so than the self-proclaimed “Lizard King,” Jim Morrison.

True rock ‘n’ roll seethes with danger, bordering, at times, on madness, whether Jerry Lee Lewis pounding his piano like a man possessed by the devil he feared, or Jimi Hendrix’s feedback melting your face as he nonchalantly asked, “Are you experienced?”

Released on January 4, 1967, The Doors’ self-titled debut presented the peace and love crowd with a strange invitation. Like some crazy stranger you just met, Jim stands on a precarious precipice, arm stretched out beckoning you to leap with him into the great unknown.

More, with several music video links

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#297929 - 01/05/17 10:48 PM Re: The Doors’ Debut Is Still One of the Most Dangerous Albums Ever [Re: Golem]
pondering_it_all Offline
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Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 6682
Loc: North San Diego County
Unfortunately, Jim had a certain chord progression in his head, so all their songs sounded the same. Definitely weird, certainly with some blues and modern jazz (of the 60s and 70s) roots, but ultimately all the same. Maybe if he had lived longer, he would have had time for some growth into other realms.

I have the same problem with every Credence Clearwater Revival song ever written. Same for Nickel Creek songs. They have a certain sound they like and stay in their comfort zone way too much.

The Rolling Stones did this, the Beatles did not. Grateful Dead did, etc. Not that all of these bands were not great in their own way.

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