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#299236 - 03/05/17 12:01 AM Sous vide cooking...
Greger Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/24/06
Posts: 13757
Loc: Florida
This post is mostly for Tat since I know he already has the equipment. Loggy also has one so this is a recipe you guys should try.

I've done a lot of things with the sous vide immersion pod, positively the best steaks and chicken breasts you'll ever eat but another recipe has proven to be a real favorite.

Chicken Confit. Properly that's pronounced "con-fee" but personally I prefer the Americanized "con-feet". It's an old pre-refrigeration way of preserving meat, and traditionally it's done with duck legs. Originally the duck legs were heavily salted and then immersed in duck fat and cooked in the oven for 12-14 hours at about 175 degrees. Then they were placed in a crock and the duck fat poured over them until the were completely submerged and allowed to cool.
Basically the meat was ultra pasteurized then sealed with the fat to prevent any contaminants from getting to it. Theoretically it could last for weeks or months without spoiling.

Enter the sous vide method and modernist cooking....

Duck legs are hard to come by. And duck fat is expensive. But dark meat is dark meat and fat is fat so it works perfectly with chicken and olive oil. And the end result is amazing. Very soft, falling off the bone tender, and delicious. Perhaps it might be better if it were cooked in duck fat but my kid and I are in agreement that chicken this good just really couldn't get noticeably better.

The short version of the recipe is to season the chicken generously, put two leg quarters in a gallon zip lock, pour in some olive oil, remove all the air from the bag and put it in a 165 degree water bath for 8-10 hours.
It's okay if the leg bones seem to stick up above the oil, it will all settle a bit as it cooks and quite a bit of additional fat and delicious drippings will be rendered out of the chicken. You'll have a lot more liquid in the bag when it's done and the meat will be completely submerged in it.

When it's done I dredge it with flour and drop it in the deep fryer for about 3 minutes to crisp the skin. You can also sear it in a non stick pan with or without oil. Or just pull it off the bone and scarf it down. Handle it carefully though because there's not much connective tissue left intact and it falls apart rather easily.
Honestly, chicken just doesn't get any better than this.

You can do this ahead, refrigerate the bags just as they came from the waterbath then reheat them for a few minutes in the sous vide before crisping and serving. Or freeze them for service any time. it doesn't take long in the water bath to bring them from freezing back to service temp.

Save everything that comes out of the bag, there's gonna be a lot of fat so save it, freeze it and use it next time for even more flavorful chicken...It makes a pretty amazing gravy too.

Here's the long version of the recipe.
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"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."— Oscar Wilde

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#299237 - 03/05/17 01:00 AM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: Greger]
TatumAH Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 378
Loc: Upstate NY
Thanks Greger,

I think I have some frozen chicken here, and since my wife is out of town, the kitchen has already been converted to my mad scientist laboratory. Time to bring out the really large objectionable equipment, while the coast is clear!

When I was getting started with sous vide, I experimented, with careful controls, of seasoning with fresh herbs with and without added olive oil. I was quite surprised to find that they were tastier without the oil. It seemed like the oil absorbed the flavors and didnt make it into the chicken. These were, however, only 2 hr incubations, I mean sue veed times, or is it soo veed. So I dropped adding oil, but it looks like it was premature. Things are probably much different with an 8 hr or more immersion times.

Unfortunately, my wife would rather never see anything in food that is anatomically recognizable, including skin. She needs to be desensitized, so maybe a batch of tongue would do the trick. If it was pulled in tacos, I might be able to slip her the tongue. While researching organ meats to respond to Jeffery's foghorn leghorn post (dont ask why, would spoil the surprise), I found an extensive organ meat database, indexed by species and anatomical location. I will go hunt it down and post it as a so called or gag!

Tat
_________________________
There's nothing wrong with thinking
Except that it's lonesome work
sevil regit

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#299240 - 03/05/17 02:03 AM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: TatumAH]
Greger Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/24/06
Posts: 13757
Loc: Florida
Chicken breast doesn't seem to gain anything with the addition of oil. Steak, on the other hand, is improved with a light coating of it.
The confit recipe isn't suited to chicken breast at all. White meat can't handle that cooking time. Skin-on thighs are quite popular done that way.
I almost made green chile chicken enchiladas with it today; just strip the meat from the bones and proceed. I've also made gravy from the juices in the bag, pulled the meat off the bones and added it to the gravy then served it over mashed potatoes. That was a winner.
The chicken enchiladas(or maybe tacos) are coming up in the menu soon though. I've still got three more leg quarters to work with.

I'm looking forward to trying some skin-on bone-in chicken breasts.
The numbers vary slightly on this but something like 140 or 150 degrees for 1 to 2 hours. Some recipes say to sear the skin first some don't. In theory the flavors from the Maillard reaction should slightly improve the flavor by infusing it into the meat while it cooks sous vide. Large cuts of beef are usually seared before and after sous vide cooking but I haven't tried much of that yet.
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"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."— Oscar Wilde

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#299243 - 03/05/17 04:39 AM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: TatumAH]
pondering_it_all Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 6762
Loc: North San Diego County
Speaking of organ meats: I recently read an account from a lady that claimed her Paleo-diet of eating fresh-hunted wild meat raw had cured her MS. She also favored eating organ meats from those carcasses raw.

I guess nobody has explained to her how parasites protect themselves by attacking their host's immune system. With the right parasites, MS would not be a problem. Of course, a pork tapeworm in your brain might be...

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#299245 - 03/05/17 05:07 AM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: TatumAH]
Jeffery J. Haas Offline


Pooh-Bah

Registered: 08/03/04
Posts: 12524
Loc: Whittier, California
Originally Posted By: TatumAH

Unfortunately, my wife would rather never see anything in food that is anatomically recognizable, including skin. She needs to be desensitized, so maybe a batch of tongue would do the trick. If it was pulled in tacos, I might be able to slip her the tongue. While researching organ meats to respond to Jeffery's foghorn leghorn post (dont ask why, would spoil the surprise), I found an extensive organ meat database, indexed by species and anatomical location. I will go hunt it down and post it as a so called or gag!

Tat





Uh ohhh, should I be scared?
Thanks TAT for making Reader Rant a hoot once again!

_________________________
The men the American public admire most extravagantly are the most daring liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth. - H. L. Mencken

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#299248 - 03/05/17 08:06 AM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: Jeffery J. Haas]
TatumAH Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 378
Loc: Upstate NY
Originally Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas
Originally Posted By: TatumAH

While researching organ meats to respond to Jeffery's foghorn leghorn post (dont ask why, would spoil the surprise), I found an extensive organ meat database, indexed by species and anatomical location. I will go hunt it down and post it as a so called gag!

Tat

Originally Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas


I like to think of Foghorn Leghorn as a practical and pragmatic man, errr rooster.


Uh ohhh, should I be scared?
Thanks TAT for making Reader Rant a hoot once again!

Not necessarily scared, but maybe queasy...

Thanks, we aim to please!

Foghorne is a typical highly androgen charged, errr rooster, and most appropriately as a Cock! If you have been around large intact Cocks, you know how aggressive they can be. These characteric are related to androgen effects, and finally getting around to the organ meat connection, they have testes similar in size to those of adult humans! This shocked me when I worked with roosters/cocks and saw the internal organs.

Quote:
[/quote]
Chicken testes

[quote][Rooster Fries, Chicken Beans (North America), Chicken Testicles (Asian recipes)]

These are a popular delicacy in China, supposed to enhance male prowess, and improve skin tone for women. They seldom appear in North American cuisines. In China they are available in both pink and black, but the black fleshed silkie chickens are still a very small specialty item in North America, so the black balls are not available here.

Rooster testicles are larger than you might think, but they need to be. A rooster is expected to be up at the crack of dawn, crow his heart out - then "service" 20 or more hens during the day. No slouch he - your rooster is a busy bird. The photo specimens varied greatly in size from 1.13 inches long, 0.6 inch diameter and 0.13 ounce to 2.4 inches long, 1.13 inches diameter and 3.13 ounces. Our ever faithful red kidney bean is in the upper left corner for scale. A 12 ounce tray contained 30 nuts for an average weight of 0.4 ounces each.
Quote:

Rooster testicles are like little sausages. The casings contain flesh with an appearance and texture similar to tofu. Connoisseurs like them barely cooked so they are very tender and even a little liquid in the center, and when you bite into them they kind of go "sploosh" in your mouth. The less experienced may wish to have them cooked a little longer so they have the texture of firm tofu all the way through.

The flavor is quite mild, kind of like tofu with overtones of chicken liver - pretty innocuous, once you get used to the idea of eating roosters 'nads.


They're generally put up in foam trays of about 12 ounces and sold at about US $6.99/#. I don't know how available they are in the rest of North America.

Prep: Just rinse and cut off any stringy things dangling from them.

Cooking: Rooster nuts are usually served in a broth with mushrooms or vegetables, prepared rather simply. Some recipes call for marinating them in rice wine before cooking. They don't take a lot of cooking and will be done through and of uniform texture after simmering about 15 minutes, so watch your timing if you like them more tender.

Yield: pretty much as close to 100% as you can get.

In South American Asado, entire steers were cooked wasting nothing, most organs included balls we included. Even the blood was packed into the intestines and also roasted as blood sausage, that to me always looked like bowels filled with blood clots. Pathologists are not generally much into organ meats, too much like work, and many become vegetarians for a while in their early training when they have there highest exposure to organs on the hoof, so to speak.

What will be the next organ of interest, one can only guess wand see what pops up!

TAt
_________________________
There's nothing wrong with thinking
Except that it's lonesome work
sevil regit

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#299249 - 03/05/17 12:45 PM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: TatumAH]
logtroll Offline
veteran

Registered: 04/26/10
Posts: 8557
Loc: New Mexico (not old Mexico)
Chicken nuggets?
Quote:
... finally getting around to the organ meat connection, they have testes similar in size to those of adult humans!
_________________________
"You can't fix a problem until you understand what the problem is." Logtroll

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#299254 - 03/05/17 05:07 PM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: logtroll]
Greger Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/24/06
Posts: 13757
Loc: Florida
But here's another mystery. While roosters might have edible and delicious testicles they do NOT have a penis.

Quote:
The male chicken (rooster) does not have a penis like other animals and therefore there is no penetration of the female reproductive tract when mating. Instead the female inverts her cloaca (the common junction of the reproductive and digestive systems) which comes in contact with the male's inverted cloaca and receives the sperm. The cloaca is then drawn back into the hen's body and the sperm are captured. They then begin the journey up the length of the reproductive system.

Ducks, on the other hand, most assuredly DO...
But whether the Chinese eat them to increase penis size I have no idea.
_________________________
"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."— Oscar Wilde

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#299255 - 03/05/17 05:47 PM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: Greger]
logtroll Offline
veteran

Registered: 04/26/10
Posts: 8557
Loc: New Mexico (not old Mexico)
Who knew cooking was so fascinating!
_________________________
"You can't fix a problem until you understand what the problem is." Logtroll

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#299256 - 03/05/17 05:51 PM Re: Sous vide cooking... [Re: logtroll]
TatumAH Offline
newbie

Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 378
Loc: Upstate NY
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Chicken nuggets?
Quote:
... finally getting around to the organ meat connection, they have testes similar in size to those of adult humans!



Quote:

11 Things You Didn't Know About Rocky Mountain Oysters
By Sarah Anderson Published On 08/21/2015

The term "Rocky Mountain oyster" might make you think, "Oh! I love oysters! Are they similar to Blue Points?" But these little suckers are far from the sweet and briny sort you might anticipate at your typical oyster happy hour. So before you try to order Rocky Mountain oysters on the half shell, read up on these 11 facts!

1. They are not bivalves of the sea
Rocky Mountain oysters are not oysters at all. They're mammal testicles, and most commonly come from bulls, bison, pigs, and sheep. That's nuts, right?!
2. The dish was created by ranchers in the Rocky Mountain region
Some of the very first ranchers to inhabit the West needed inexpensive sources of food, so they experimented with different cuts of meat. And because they didn’t waste any part of the animal, they began cooking testicles with branding coals. And you know what? They were delicious!
Now, these "oysters" are typically found in the American West and western Canada, where young animal castration is commonly used to control breeding, stimulate skeletal muscle growth for beef, and regulate temperament, i.e., make the animal less angry and inclined to castrate you.
3. The cooking methods are versatile
Although Rocky Mountain oysters can be sautéed, braised, broiled, and poached, they're most often peeled, pounded flat, coated in flour, salt and pepper, and fried. (Guys, are you wincing yet?) In Canada these battered balls are typically served with a demi-glace and in America they'll likely be accompanied by cocktail sauce.
4. Testes are healthy
Battering and deep-frying aside, these organs are so rich in vitamins, minerals, and protein, it's a wonder why gym rats don't blend them into workout shakes. And in case you were wondering, eating an animal's gonads have zero effect on the human consumer's hormone balance.

5. These cojones have multiple names
Although they're most commonly referred to as oysters due to their slimy appearance when raw, some other names are used to describe the little fellas. Examples include: cowboy caviar, prairie oysters, swinging beef, Montana tendergroin, dusted nuts, bollocks, or bull/pig/lamb fry. Rocky Mountain oysters, however, is the euphemism to end all euphemisms.


Ewephemisms for goat and sheep are genderly excluded.
A rose by any other name is still a rose.
I was quite surprised by the limited creativity in the naming of the various offal recipes. I was expecting at least a spaghetti with meat balls, or some such, but was disappointed. Let your culinary juices flow and fill this void. I am working up a masturpiece to memorialize our deceased justice Scalia with a working title of Scrotale Bolognese.

Tat



https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5...65/?format=750w




Edited by TatumAH (03/05/17 05:55 PM)
Edit Reason: speeling of Bolognese, though iI prefurr bowlegnese
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There's nothing wrong with thinking
Except that it's lonesome work
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