Current Topics
Al Franken 2020
by pdx rick
Today at 06:02 AM
sex assaults
by Spag-hetti
Today at 04:18 AM
the democratic plan to win
by jgw
Yesterday at 07:10 PM
Trump held his first VA listening session without veterans advocates
by Jeffery J. Haas
Yesterday at 12:48 AM
Round Table for November, 2017
by pdx rick
Yesterday at 12:06 AM
Miscellaneous humor thread
by Jeffery J. Haas
11/19/17 10:32 PM
Donald Trump Jr.'s Elephant Tail
by NW Ponderer
11/19/17 08:22 PM
Reign of Idiots
by rporter314
11/19/17 12:50 PM
Is keystone xl dead?
by pondering_it_all
11/19/17 06:05 AM
Let’s just cancel the Oscars
by Jeffery J. Haas
11/18/17 10:23 PM
Gun Control
by NW Ponderer
11/18/17 12:54 PM
Why Netflix’s ‘Godless’ is the Western you’ve been waiting for
by Golem
11/17/17 08:57 PM
NASA weather clip
by rporter314
11/17/17 12:26 AM
an amusement
by pondering_it_all
11/17/17 12:23 AM
The Common Sense Party
by jgw
11/16/17 09:01 PM
Forum Stats
6248 Members
57 Forums
16101 Topics
277436 Posts

Max Online: 282 @ 05/29/08 05:08 AM
Google Adsense
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#302968 - 09/03/17 08:20 PM Houston, Texas
jgw Offline
member

Registered: 05/22/06
Posts: 1738
Loc: Port Angeles, WA
South Texas is experiencing which is, quite possibly, the worst weather disaster in its history. Houston is of specific interest. They are now figuring a trillion dollar property loss, 100,000 homes destroyed or damaged, thousands homeless, etc.

The interesting thing is that this could have been taken care of. Houston has a long history of floods and much of that city is built on flood plains. After every flood they have had ballot initiatives to fix their problems yet the voters there have consistently voted such down. Everytime major flooding happens the congress also makes a run at fixing the flood insurance. They don't fix anything either. This seems to mean that all the pain and anguish they are now experiencing are, in large part, the fault of those having the problems may be the same people who decided that fixing the problem cost too much? (just, I guess, a mean spirited thought).

Then we have the Federal Flood Insurance. It seems that Houston is the capital of flood insurance payouts. There is one home that has been flooded something like 16 out of the last 18 years. The insurance plan itself is OVER 30 billion dollars in debt. In other words this is a program that, basically, rebuilds houses for idiots that build on flood planes because, apparently, the idiots deserve it.
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/08/29/a-storm-made-in-washington-215549

I feel bad about the pain, suffering and death of this catastrophe. Still, however, a lot of people, have spent a lot of time, trying to stop these kinds of things from the getgo (known in Texas as "them damned environmentalists"). Common sense would tell anybody that building on a flood plain is a really bad idea but that doesn't stop them brave Americans from doing it anyway. When anybody tries to stop the insanity they get slapped down quickly and them that gain are the developers and politicians.

Top
#302969 - 09/03/17 09:34 PM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
pondering_it_all Offline
veteran

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 7094
Loc: North San Diego County
Simple fix: Make it a rule that any house being built or rebuilt in these areas has to be put up on pilings. It would mean lots if folks could work in the "house raising" industry, but it would also mean fewer and fewer losses in the future. If people insist on living in the flood plain, at least make sure their houses can survive a flood.

Because this nonsense about two 500-year floods and now this 1000-year flood within the last three years, is just that: Nonsense. Obviously, they can't be 500 and 1000-year floods if they happen every year. Climate change is HERE, NOW, and those floods are now yearly events. It's not going to get better just by closing our eyes and wishing real hard.

Top
#302971 - 09/03/17 10:38 PM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
jgw Offline
member

Registered: 05/22/06
Posts: 1738
Loc: Port Angeles, WA
First, Texans, for the most part, do not believe in Climate Change. Everybody knows that only the Lord can change the weather! <G> If you read the history of the Federal Flood Insurance thing you will find that folks have been trying, for years, to put regulations in, stuff like building on a flood plain, building on ocean front, etc. Even minor changes are fought to the death. The result is a 30+ BILLION dollar debt. From the link I posted above:
"The most egregious example was a home that had flooded 16 times in 18 years, netting its owners more than $800,000 even though it was valued at less than $115,000." (this is in Houston).

Putting the houses on pilings work but it still means folks are building in flood prone areas which, I think, is a pretty bad idea no matter what. Given the simple fact that sea level is rising, world wide, and they are saying that there are some pretty horrible possibilities (already probable). Right now they are talking about a 10 to 15 foot rise. In Bangladesh, for instance, a million people have already been pushed out of their homes due to sea level change (Bangladesh is built on a flood plain - the whole country! I fully expect, for instance, that Houston will get hit next year with something at least as bad (sea temps continue to rise, worldwide, and along with that come more powerful weather things)). Still, the incredible scope of the Houston thing should wake up some of the deniers (then, again, probably not). Houston has known, for years, that they have a problem but have rejected any and all fixes. It would seem that places that flood love their floods, in spite of their pain, deaths, and anguish, otherwise the problem would have been fixed.

A couple of months ago I was in Texas to deal with something. When I was leaving (I said I was going home) I was asked where that was. I told them "up near Seattle" and at least 4 people said something to the effect of; "Oh, up there where it rains all the time". I then pointed out that for the 2 weeks I was down there I watched 18 wheelers trying, and sometimes failing, to keep their rigs on the road due to high winds. Then there was the lightening. During my stay I swear we were in the middle of a regular lightening fest! Then there was the rain. The road in front of the motel we were staying in turned into close to a foot deep, swiftly running, stream. My response (why make enemies) was to smile and be grateful for where I live. My point is that Texans seem to have a slightly different take on reality than mine (my apologies to any Texans).

Top
#302972 - 09/04/17 12:05 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
pondering_it_all Offline
veteran

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 7094
Loc: North San Diego County
Houston is over 50 feet above sea level, so it's not going to be affected by sea level rising for a long time. The real problem is that it is all pretty much flat and only 50 miles from the coast: When big storms come in the rain just falls a lot faster than it can drain. Just a stupid place to build a city. Unless your city is Venice.

Like looking at the bottom of the Los Angeles River bed and saying: "That looks pretty dry down there." Yeah, but once every year of so it floods from bank to bank.

Maybe we can start charging the real cost for flood insurance there, at the federal level. It IS federal flood insurance, after all. Texans can vote any way they like and promote all sorts of stupidity in their political campaigns. It won't matter if the insurance costs $100,000 per year. But if you build on pilings then we discount it to $2000.

Top
#302973 - 09/04/17 12:32 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
pondering_it_all Offline
veteran

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 7094
Loc: North San Diego County
I see Irma is on track to take out Mar-A-Lago. 16 feet elevation, and on the beach in Palm Beach, not even inland in West Palm Beach. This is on the barrier island, not on the mainland. Basically, the stupidest place to build in Florida.

You can enjoy the show:

Boat US Hurricane Tracking: Irma
_________________________
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

John Steinbeck

Top
#302974 - 09/04/17 06:08 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
Jeffery J. Haas Offline


Pooh-Bah

Registered: 08/03/04
Posts: 12726
Loc: Whittier, California
Wally Hayman

The Nays of Texans Are Rife Upon Them
Interesting that articles are now popping up in various publications ballyhooing Texans' independence from government, or more specifically, independence from the Federal government.

It's a curiosity to me why Texans don't trust the "daggone gubmint." Perhaps the distrust is based more on their experiences with state government rather than federal since it's always been the Federal government's job (dating back to Texas statehood in 1845) to bail out the Lonestar State, whether the bailing bucket has been filled with crushing debt, choking dust or unrelenting flood waters.

If my memory of American History class has remained intact, I believe it was Federal American troops marching across Mexico between 1846 and 1848 that further secured the perpetuity of Texas statehood. Texas would not have survived as an entity beyond the middle of the 19th century had it not been for the United State's government's infusion of blood and money to bail-out of Texas's massive debt to foreign nations. Texans gave up nationhood for statehood because they had so badly mismanaged their own lives.
A scant 16 years after Texas was rescued by the United States and granted statehood, they announced their desire to secede, only to bring on a new round of death and destruction and incur a brand new crushing debt.
Go figure.

During the years-long nightmare that was the 1930s Dust Bowl and concurrent mass immigration to California and other points west, the Panhandle was decimated by a lack of government regulations on farming (particularly the lack of soil conservation). When those self-inflicted wounds were combined with an inevitable and prolonged period of severe drought, a largely man-made and epic disaster naturally followed.
Enter another massive Federal rescue.

Fast forward to the 21st century and a Texas government once again allergic to regulations - and this time coupled with global warming to insure worse droughts in the Panhandle even while its coastal cities are inundated with floods from ever more terrifying hurricanes.
I need not mention the addition of 100% man-made environmental disasters triggered by unregulated industry and a total lack of zoning. We're currently seeing that folly play out, too.

If the good citizens and politicians of Texas don't want our help this time...well, fine! At some point, the Federal government needs to wish them well and privately think, good riddance.

But let's look at California. Unlike the Panhandle, which has served as a fertile and critical region of America's "breadbasket" in good (and regulated) times, much of California is nothing more than reclaimed and otherwise desolate desert. Stop importing water from greener regions of the State and most of California would die. The slightest negative change in any combination of natural or man-made impositions on the State's ecosystem can lead to crises.

Historically, California's government and citizenry have not been devoid of their own recklessness. When combined, cupidity and ignorance can be a deadly force and the enduring battle for survival remains very much alive and tenuous there, too. Yet even while Californians seem to be gradually learning from their past mistakes, Texans appear to be intent on heading in the opposite direction.

Sam Houston once said, "Texas will again lift its head and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with its natural advantages."

Well that's great Sam, but as you knew, it required good governance to make that happen. You clearly understood that fact when you wrote, "A leader is someone who helps improve the lives of other people - or improves the system they live under."
Wise words for these times.

WBH
_________________________
The men the American public admire most extravagantly are the most daring liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth. - H. L. Mencken

Top
#302976 - 09/04/17 06:25 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
pdx rick Offline
Member
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/09/05
Posts: 40554
Loc: Puget Sound, WA
Quote:
... After every flood they have had ballot initiatives to fix their problems yet the voters there have consistently voted such down...

Cheap and chintzy red staters, who bemoan anyone getting government assistance, turn down the opportunity to fix their communities because it will cost them money - expecting FEMA to fix things for them now?!? Say it's not so! cry , coffee
_________________________
Contrarian, extraordinaire



Top
#302977 - 09/04/17 06:29 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: pondering_it_all]
pdx rick Offline
Member
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/09/05
Posts: 40554
Loc: Puget Sound, WA
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Climate change is HERE, NOW, and those floods are now yearly events. It's not going to get better just by closing our eyes and wishing real hard.

Closing their eyes and wishing the floods aways works for these red staters. Why doesn't it work for you PIA? coffee
_________________________
Contrarian, extraordinaire



Top
#302980 - 09/04/17 05:50 PM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
jgw Offline
member

Registered: 05/22/06
Posts: 1738
Loc: Port Angeles, WA
Remember, when the current governor of Texas came to power, and the army was running war games in Texas that/this governor bravely called out the Texas national guard to fight of the 'invasion' of the US Army!
http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpoliti...-obama-takeover
google "texas governor declares invasion by army"

I have friends in Texas. They are not liberals in any sense of the word, but they all firmly believe, and are sick and tired, of crazies in their government. That, obviously, does not extend to the Texas voting public <G>

Top
#302985 - 09/04/17 10:13 PM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
Jeffery J. Haas Offline


Pooh-Bah

Registered: 08/03/04
Posts: 12726
Loc: Whittier, California
I have a FAMILY member who firmly believed that the Jade Helm exercise was a deliberate attempt by Obama to declare martial law in Texas. He bought the Alex Jones story hook, line and sinker!
They were even sharing "maps" that showed Wal-Mart stores where military equipment was being staged for transport TO Texas using underground tunnels from California to Texas via these closed Wal-Mart stores.
I LIVE a quarter mile from one of the "ground zero" Wal-Mart stores in Pico Rivera, CA.
A friend of mine, who lives in his RV ever since his wife threw him out, was living IN the PARKING LOT OF that Wal-Mart store.
No black helicopters, no tunneling equipment, no MILLIONS of tons of DIRT that one would expect if they were tunneling from California to Texas, no military equipment...NOTHING.

It didn't matter. The more I showed proof that the Jones hysteria was nonsense, the further my sibling dug his heels in.
And mind you, he had just retired from a thirty year career with a major national defense contractor where he was in charge of logistics. He is not a stupid man.
But he was, and still is, THOROUGHLY HYPNOTIZED.

He also still believes that "Killery" was running a child sex ring out of the basement of a pizzeria.

I cannot explain how normally intelligent people suddenly take total leave of their senses and become hypnotized this way. It's cult behavior, straight up.
If Alex Jones were to start a church on some Central American island and tell people to drink cyanide laced Kool-Aid,
I am firmly convinced my sibling would be among the first in line.
And that thought scares the bejeezus out of me.
_________________________
The men the American public admire most extravagantly are the most daring liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth. - H. L. Mencken

Top
#302987 - 09/05/17 12:14 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
pondering_it_all Offline
veteran

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 7094
Loc: North San Diego County
I wonder if the initial brain-washing is done by Evangelical Christianity: You have to learn to accept mutually contradictory things, which may be outside any real-world experiences, with absolutely zero evidence.

Once you have that down, there are all sorts of magical things you can believe.

Top
#302993 - 09/05/17 05:25 AM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
Jeffery J. Haas Offline


Pooh-Bah

Registered: 08/03/04
Posts: 12726
Loc: Whittier, California
I suspect that is also true of the Jews for Jesus community, of which he is a part.
Never mind that most Jews will adamantly insist he is not actually Jewish but he says that he is.
He looks, acts, talks and thinks like a RW fundie evengelical dominionist, except for the Jewish clothing accessories.
_________________________
The men the American public admire most extravagantly are the most daring liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth. - H. L. Mencken

Top
#303037 - 09/07/17 07:17 PM Re: Houston, Texas [Re: jgw]
jgw Offline
member

Registered: 05/22/06
Posts: 1738
Loc: Port Angeles, WA
Now that Trump has decided that its only right that religions preach politics from the pulpit you can count on a lot of very strange coming from the religious communities. Praise be!!!

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Who's Online
0 registered (), 29 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
TrentonP, Nosf50, erumonej, Jensen Breck, Albertapkr
6248 Registered Users
A2