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#326016 - 05/24/20 12:34 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: chunkstyle]
perotista Offline
journeyman

Registered: 09/05/19
Posts: 718
Like everything else political, I think whether or not one views a candidate, a person as being charismatic is a personal opinion. For my purpose it was pitting candidate against candidate. How one's charismatic personality can attract voters to him that otherwise may not have voted for him.

The top four according to Larry Sabato was FDR, JFK, Reagan and Bill Clinton as having dynamic charismatic personalities. I'd have to add Obama to that list, while in my opinion, Obama had less charisma that those four. I was also talking about attracting voters from America as a whole, not just one's supporters.

Supporters of certain candidates are usually entranced by that candidate. But how that candidates fairs with those who aren't his avid supporters is where charisma comes into play, especially with independents, the non-affiliated voter.

I do think Sanders had more charisma than Biden, but we're talking about the Democratic primary voters. Less than a third of all voters nationwide. Sanders didn't have a chance to test those waters and to see if he could or couldn't attract the independent voter. He was tested only by Democrats for the most part although some independents did vote in the open primary states. The primaries are more about name recognition and political stances, ideology, party loyalist.

You haven't yet got into the battle for the less political, the less to non-partisan and non-affiliated voter. They haven't had a chance to weigh in yet.

There's no doubt in my mind that Biden isn't charismatic in the sense of a Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, JFK or even an Obama. But not being Trump may be enough. Hillary certainly wasn't, her personality wasn't the type to attract independents. Neither was Kerry or Gore, two statues. McCain didn't have it either nor Dole or G.H.W Bush. If you don't have it, you better hope you get matched up against someone with less charisma than you which happened in 1988, Bush vs. Dukakis, 1968 Nixon vs. Humphrey, 1976 Carter vs. Ford and so on.

Perhaps the most important thing is how a candidate and as president later on can connect with the people. Once again the best at this were the four Larry Sabato pointed out. FDR, JFK, Reagan and Bill Clinton. then in fifth place, I'd put Obama.
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It's high past time that we start electing Americans to congress and the presidency who put America first instead of their political party. For way too long we have been electing Republicans and Democrats who happen to be Americans instead of Americans who happen to be Republicans and Democrats.

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#326023 - 05/24/20 07:18 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: chunkstyle]
perotista Offline
journeyman

Registered: 09/05/19
Posts: 718
Another interesting article.

"How the Trump Effect Could Lift Democratic Senate Candidates"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-effect-could-lift-democratic-152720830.html

I'd say if the election were held today, the Democrats pick up Arizona, Colorado and Maine, lose Alabama. Then there are the pure tossup's. All Republican held, Montana, Georgia's two seats, North Carolina and perhaps even Kentucky. If the election were held today, Biden would be an easy winner.

That's how I see the election stacked up today. But November is a long way off and things can change in a hurry.
_________________________
It's high past time that we start electing Americans to congress and the presidency who put America first instead of their political party. For way too long we have been electing Republicans and Democrats who happen to be Americans instead of Americans who happen to be Republicans and Democrats.

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#326025 - 05/24/20 07:29 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: perotista]
pdx rick Offline
Member
CHB-OG

Registered: 05/09/05
Posts: 43120
Loc: Puget Sound, WA
Originally Posted By: perotista
"How the Trump Effect Could Lift Democratic Senate Candidates"

Such effect as killing over 100,000 Americans through shear incompetence? Well duh...

rolleyes
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#326026 - 05/24/20 07:31 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: chunkstyle]
pdx rick Offline
Member
CHB-OG

Registered: 05/09/05
Posts: 43120
Loc: Puget Sound, WA


The virus is just now spreading through rural red state America - furthered by the rural idiots going to state capitals protesting the shut-down, hugging each other and high-fiviging each other maskless.


smile
_________________________
Contrarian, extraordinaire



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#326028 - 05/24/20 08:55 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: perotista]
GreatNewsTonight Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/27/20
Posts: 264
Originally Posted By: perotista
Like everything else political, I think whether or not one views a candidate, a person as being charismatic is a personal opinion. For my purpose it was pitting candidate against candidate. How one's charismatic personality can attract voters to him that otherwise may not have voted for him.

The top four according to Larry Sabato was FDR, JFK, Reagan and Bill Clinton as having dynamic charismatic personalities. I'd have to add Obama to that list, while in my opinion, Obama had less charisma that those four. I was also talking about attracting voters from America as a whole, not just one's supporters.

Supporters of certain candidates are usually entranced by that candidate. But how that candidates fairs with those who aren't his avid supporters is where charisma comes into play, especially with independents, the non-affiliated voter.

I do think Sanders had more charisma than Biden, but we're talking about the Democratic primary voters. Less than a third of all voters nationwide. Sanders didn't have a chance to test those waters and to see if he could or couldn't attract the independent voter. He was tested only by Democrats for the most part although some independents did vote in the open primary states. The primaries are more about name recognition and political stances, ideology, party loyalist.

You haven't yet got into the battle for the less political, the less to non-partisan and non-affiliated voter. They haven't had a chance to weigh in yet.

There's no doubt in my mind that Biden isn't charismatic in the sense of a Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, JFK or even an Obama. But not being Trump may be enough. Hillary certainly wasn't, her personality wasn't the type to attract independents. Neither was Kerry or Gore, two statues. McCain didn't have it either nor Dole or G.H.W Bush. If you don't have it, you better hope you get matched up against someone with less charisma than you which happened in 1988, Bush vs. Dukakis, 1968 Nixon vs. Humphrey, 1976 Carter vs. Ford and so on.

Perhaps the most important thing is how a candidate and as president later on can connect with the people. Once again the best at this were the four Larry Sabato pointed out. FDR, JFK, Reagan and Bill Clinton. then in fifth place, I'd put Obama.


Correct. Bernie Sanders never had the opportunity to go through the screening of the entire population of American voters, yes. But taking back what I said to Greger, that's because he's a loser. He lost two primaries, one by 3.7 million votes to one of the worst candidates ever (in terms of charisma and campaign strategy), and is losing this one already by 3.4 million votes with 21 more contests to go.

But if he had the opportunity to run for the hearts and minds of non-Democratic-leaning independents and Repubicans, I frankly doubt that he'd get many more people. If on the left side of the spectrum he already didn't have sufficient traction, who do you expect would vote for him from the right side of the spectrum (the folks who think that socialism is a foul word)?

No, Bernie Sanders only excited a niche of ultra-progressive people in the Democratic side of the spectrum. Not even the more moderate Democrats like him, let alone the right-leaning voters.

But the thing is, sure, he didn't get to test his chances in a general presidential election (being the loser that he is), but we shouldn't even be talking about these chances any longer. Bernie Sanders won't run a third time in 2024. I doubt he'll even be alive by them, if the rumors about his cardiac ejection fraction are true.

Bernie Sanders right now is a has-been, and what was there to start with wasn't much.

History will look back at Bernie Sanders as a small blimp - an ineffective house representative and senator who never amounted to much while in federal office, and unsuccessfully ran twice for the presidential nomination, being soundly defeated both times.

The one thing Bernie Sanders will be remembered for, is that many of his followers helped Trump win the 2016 Electoral College, given that the number of Bernie or Bust defectors in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin far exceeded Trump's narrow margin of victory in those states, as proven by a famous Newsweek Magazine article that has circulated widely in Politics forums.

Future History book entry on Bernie Sanders:

"Rather obscure House Representative and Senator from Vermont, who was in the bottom 4 of ineffective senators with a minimum number of bills passed, and unsuccessfully ran twice for the Democratic presidential nomination (despite being an independent), when he lost to Hillary Clinton by 3.7 million votes in 2016, and to Joseph Biden by 5.5 million votes in 2020. Bernie Sanders, a failed progressive with vacuous populist ideas that were soundly rejected at the time by 85% of the American public, had as only claim to fame, the fact that his Bernie or Bust movement was one of the various important factors that ensured Donald J. Trump's Electoral College victory in 2016, which ultimately determined the decline of Democracy and the Rule of Law in America, and the subsequent prolonged economic downturn (stemming from Trump's mismanagement of the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA) and loss of American influence and competitiveness around the world. Bernie Sanders was briefly the banner holder for the progressive movement in America, but his disastrous losses set back that movement for several years, as his aiding Trump resulted in a large number of conservative judicial nominations to federal courts and the Supreme Court, which hindered the progressive ideals for several decades. Shortly after the end of the 2020 campaign, Bernie Sanders died of congestive heart failure. In summary, he didn't accomplish much in his long political career, except for sinking the progressive movement, and helping Donald J. Trump get elected, which triggered the end of the so-called American empire."

That's about it. It summarizes very well the failed career of the loser known ad Bernie Sanders, and the damage that he inflicted upon his progressive followers and upon the rest of the nation and the world, by helping Trump get elected.
_________________________
Please take COVID-19 seriously; don't panic but don't deny it; practice social distancing (stay 6ft from people); wash your hands a lot, don't touch your face, don't gather with too many people, so that you help us contain it.

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#326029 - 05/24/20 08:57 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: pdx rick]
GreatNewsTonight Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/27/20
Posts: 264
Originally Posted By: pdx rick


The virus is just now spreading through rural red state America - furthered by the rural idiots going to state capitals protesting the shut-down, hugging each other and high-fiviging each other maskless.


smile


Hopefully Darwin Law will thin the herd of the stupid Trump supporters, contributing to his electoral loss in November.

_________________________
Please take COVID-19 seriously; don't panic but don't deny it; practice social distancing (stay 6ft from people); wash your hands a lot, don't touch your face, don't gather with too many people, so that you help us contain it.

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#326032 - 05/24/20 11:45 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: GreatNewsTonight]
logtroll Offline
veteran

Registered: 04/26/10
Posts: 10283
Loc: One of the Mexicos
Originally Posted By: GreatNewsTonight

Bernie Sanders right now is a has-been, and what was there to start with wasn't much.

History will look back at Bernie Sanders as a small blimp - an ineffective house representative and senator who never amounted to much while in federal office, and unsuccessfully ran twice for the presidential nomination, being soundly defeated both times.

Geez, GNT, your emotional and irrational spleen against Bernie really thins your credibility as an objective critic. Granted, Sanders has not successfully sponsored much in the way of straight up bills, but he is known as the "King of Amendments" and has seriously impacted the direction of the left. Here's a good article on that:
https://www.quora.com/What-are-Bernie-Sanders-Senatorial-accomplishments
Quote:
Bernie’s accomplishments
(The actions I consider to be “legislative accomplishments” are shown in bold face type.)

Elected by the state of Vermont 8 times to serve in the House of Representatives.
The longest-serving independent in U.S. congressional history.
Is by far the member of Congress best regarded by his constituents.
He was dubbed the “amendment king” in the House of Representatives for passing more amendments than any other member of Congress.
Ranking member on the Senate Budget Committee.
Former student organizer for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Led the first ever civil rights sit-in in Chicago history to protest segregated housing.
In 1963, Bernie Sanders participated in MLK’s Civil Rights March. One of only 2 sitting US Senators to have heard MLK’s “I have a Dream Speech” in person in the march on Washington, DC.
Former professor of political science at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and at Hamilton College.
Former mayor of Burlington, VT. In a stunning upset in 1981, Sanders won the mayoral race in Burlington, Vermont’s largest city. He shocked the city’s political establishment by defeating a six-term, local machine mayor. Burlington is now reported to be one of the most livable cities in the nation.
Co-founded the Congressional Progressive Caucus and chaired the group for its first 8 years.
(BTW the CPC has for each of the last 7 budget years authored and published a Federal Budget proposal that would have created more jobs and reduced the National Debt significantly faster than the proposals of either political party or the Executive Branch. ‘The People’s Budget’: Analysis of the Congressional Progressive Caucus budget for fiscal year 2018)
Both the NAACP and the NHLA (National Hispanic Leadership Agenda) have given Sanders 100% voting scores during his tenure in the Senate. Earns a D- from the NRA.
1984: Mayor Sanders established the Burlington Community Land Trust, the first municipal housing land-trust in the country for affordable housing. The project becomes a model emulated throughout the world. It later wins an award from Jack Kemp-led HUD.
1991: one of a handful in Congress to vote against authorizing US military force in Iraq. “I have a real fear that the region is not going to be more peaceful or more stable after the war,” he said at the time.
1992: Congress passes Sanders’ first signed piece of legislation to create the National Program of Cancer Registries. A Reader’s Digest article calls the law “the cancer weapon America needs most.” All 50 states now run registries to help cancer researchers gain important insights.
November 1993: Sanders votes against the Clinton-era North American Free Trade Agreement. Returning from a tour of factories in Mexico, Sanders says: “If NAFTA passes, corporate profits will soar because it will be even easier than now for American companies to flee to Mexico and hire workers there for starvation wages.”
July 1996: Sanders is one of only 67 (out of 435, 15%) votes against the discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act, which denied federal benefits to same-sex couples legally married. Sanders urged the Supreme Court to throw out the law, which it did in a landmark 2013 ruling – some 17 years later.
July 1999: Standing up against the major pharmaceutical companies, Sanders becomes the first member of Congress to personally take seniors across the border to Canada to buy lower-cost prescription drugs. The congressman continues his bus trips to Canada with a group of breast cancer patients the following April. These brave women are able to purchase their medications in Canada for almost one-tenth the price charged in the States.
August 1999: An overflow crowd of Vermonters packs a St. Michael’s College town hall meeting hosted by Sanders to protest an IBM plan to cut older workers’ pensions by as much as 50 percent. CBS Evening News with Dan Rather and The New York Times cover the event. After IBM enacts the plan, Sanders works to reverse the cuts, passing a pair of amendments to prohibit the federal government from acting to overturn a federal district court decision that ruled that IBM’s plan violated pension age discrimination laws. Thanks to Sanders’ efforts, IBM agreed to a $320 million legal settlement with some 130,000 IBM workers and retirees.
November 1999: About 10 years before the 2008 Wall Street crash spins the world economy into a massive recession, Sanders votes “no” on a bill to undo decades of financial regulations enacted after the Great Depression. “This legislation,” he predicts at the time, “will lead to fewer banks and financial service providers, increased charges and fees for individual consumers and small businesses, diminished credit for rural America and taxpayer exposure to potential losses should a financial conglomerate fail. It will lead to more mega-mergers, a small number of corporations dominating the financial service industry and further concentration of power in our country.” The House passed the bill 362-57 over Sanders’ objection.
October 2001: Sanders votes against the USA Patriot Act. “All of us want to protect the American people from terrorist attacks, but in a way that does not undermine basic freedoms,” Sanders says at the time. He subsequently votes against reauthorizing the law in 2006 and 2011.
October 2002: Sanders votes against the Bush-Cheney war in Iraq. He warns at the time that an invasion could “result in anti-Americanism, instability and more terrorism.” Hillary Clinton votes in favor of it.
November 2006: Sanders defeats Vermont’s richest man, Rich Tarrant, to be elected to the U.S. Senate. Sanders, running as an Independent, is endorsed by the Vermont Democratic Party and supported by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.
December 2007: Sanders’ authored energy efficiency and conservation grant program passes into law. He later secures $3.2 billion in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for the grant program.
September 2008: Thanks to Sanders’ efforts, funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program funding doubles, helping millions of low-income Americans heat their homes in winter.
February 2009: Sanders works with Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley to pass an amendment to an economic recovery bill preventing Wall Street banks that take taxpayer bailouts from replacing laid-off U.S. workers with exploited and poorly-paid foreign workers.
December 2009: Sanders passes language in the Affordable Care Act to allow states to apply for waivers to implement pilot health care systems by 2017. The legislation allows states to adopt more comprehensive systems to cover more people at lower costs.
March 2010: President Barack Obama signs into law the Affordable Care Act with a major Sanders provision to expand federally qualified community health centers. Sanders secures $12.5 billion in funding for the program which now serves more than 25 million Americans. Another $1.5 billion from a Sanders provision went to the National Health Service Corps for scholarships and loan repayment for doctors and nurses who practice in under-served communities.
July 2010: Sanders works with Republican Congressman Ron Paul in the House to pass a measure as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform bill to audit the Federal Reserve, revealing how the independent agency gave $16 trillion in near zero-interest loans to big banks and businesses after the 2008 economic collapse.
March 2013: Sanders, now chairman of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, and backed by seniors, women, veterans, labor unions and disabled Americans, leads a successful effort to stop a “chained-CPI” proposal supported by Congressional Republicans and the Administration to cut Social Security and disabled veterans’ benefits.
April 2013: Sanders introduces legislation to break up major Wall Street banks so large that the collapse of one could send the overall economy into a downward spiral.
August 2014: A bipartisan $16.5 billion veterans bill written by Sen. Sanders, Sen. John McCain and Rep. Jeff Miller is signed into law by President Barack Obama. The measure includes $5 billion for the VA to hire more doctors and health professionals to meet growing demand for care.
January 2015: Sanders takes over as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee, using the platform to fight for his economic agenda for the American middle class.
January 2015: Sanders votes against the Keystone XL pipeline, which would allow multinational corporation TransCanada to transport dirty tar sands oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.
March 2015: Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) introduced legislation to expand benefits and strengthen the retirement program for generations to come. The Social Security Expansion Act was filed on the same day Sanders and other senators received the petitions signed by 2 million Americans, gathered by the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.
September 2015: Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.), Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.) today introduced bills to ban private prisons [which have been 3 to 4 times as expensive with much higher rates of prisoner abuse, guard injury than government run prisons], reinstate the federal parole system and eliminate quotas for the number of immigrants held in detention.
January 2016: Sanders Places Hold on FDA Nominee Dr. Robert Califf because of his close ties to the pharmaceutical industry and lack of commitment to lowering drug prices. There is no reason to believe that he would make the FDA work for ordinary Americans, rather than just the CEOs of pharmaceutical companies.

———————

ADDENDUM: Several people have asked about Senator Sanders accomplishments since 2016. Which is a tough question, because the US Senate has done almost no legislating since 2016 of any sort. Senator Sanders introduced 397 bills (sponsored or cosponsored) in the current Congress, but like so many others, his bills are sitting on the Majority Leaders’ desk, not being acted upon.

Bernard Sanders Legislation in Process 115th and 116th Congresses.

I believe that the 457 bills he introduced during the 115th Congress all lapsed when that Congress ended.
_________________________
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”
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#326034 - 05/24/20 11:55 PM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: GreatNewsTonight]
Jeffery J. Haas Offline
It's the Despair Quotient!
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/04
Posts: 15728
Loc: Whittier, California
Originally Posted By: GreatNewsTonight

Future History book entry on Bernie Sanders


If that book was written by Rush Limbaugh, maybe.
Really, that's a lotta hyperbole.
And the thing you seem to be leaving out in your rather bitter sendup is the fact, the indisputable fact, that Sanders was perhaps the only really REALLY honest candidate to come down the pike in decades.

Sorry GNT but I count his mistakes mostly as branding, packaging, presentation and an inability to make a somewhat bigger tent.
Of course, that latter was due to his self-inflicted branding problems.

But deep down, like him or despise him, Sanders is pretty much real, sincere, and honest.
And that counts for a lot.
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#326036 - 05/25/20 12:15 AM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: chunkstyle]
perotista Offline
journeyman

Registered: 09/05/19
Posts: 718
Sanders in my opinion is/was too far left to attract as you put it, moderate democrats and even more moderate independents who for the most part fall somewhere in-between the ideologies of today's Republican and Democratic Parties.

I would have never voted for him, he's too extreme for me. But having said that, Sanders may just be ahead of his time. Much like Goldwater back in 1964 was way too far right for most Americans, he was considered an extremist from the right. Goldwater led to a conservative movement that led to the election of Reagan and the movement of the country to the right. Sanders might be a few years ahead of his time like Goldwater was. Who knows, 10-15 years from now, Sanders political philosophy might be considered main stream as conservatism under Reagan and the two Bush's were considerate mainstream by a majority of Americans.

Even Bill Clinton more or less govern much like a moderate conservative, not a liberal and certainly not as a progressive. New movements take time to catch on, for people to come around to not viewing a new movement as being extreme.

After FDR, Truman, Eisenhower, JFK with LBJ picking up the liberal mantra, most Americans weren't ready to switch to or take another path, road to the right as far as Goldwater wanted to take the country. I don't think most Americans are ready for Sanders and his ideas to push the country far to the left after Reagan, Bill Clinton, the two Bush's. Obama tried in his first two years and most Americans said stop right there with a whopping 63 seat loss in the House and an 8 seat loss in the senate in 2010. But who knows, come 2028 or 2032, that sharp left turn onto a progressive Sanders path may be just what the country is ready for.
_________________________
It's high past time that we start electing Americans to congress and the presidency who put America first instead of their political party. For way too long we have been electing Republicans and Democrats who happen to be Americans instead of Americans who happen to be Republicans and Democrats.

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#326037 - 05/25/20 12:30 AM Re: Is it too soon to be talking 2020? [Re: logtroll]
GreatNewsTonight Offline
newbie

Registered: 04/27/20
Posts: 264
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: GreatNewsTonight

Bernie Sanders right now is a has-been, and what was there to start with wasn't much.

History will look back at Bernie Sanders as a small blimp - an ineffective house representative and senator who never amounted to much while in federal office, and unsuccessfully ran twice for the presidential nomination, being soundly defeated both times.

Geez, GNT, your emotional and irrational spleen against Bernie really thins your credibility as an objective critic. Granted, Sanders has not successfully sponsored much in the way of straight up bills, but he is known as the "King of Amendments" and has seriously impacted the direction of the left. Here's a good article on that:
https://www.quora.com/What-are-Bernie-Sanders-Senatorial-accomplishments
Quote:
Bernie’s accomplishments
(The actions I consider to be “legislative accomplishments” are shown in bold face type.)

Elected by the state of Vermont 8 times to serve in the House of Representatives.
The longest-serving independent in U.S. congressional history.
Is by far the member of Congress best regarded by his constituents.
He was dubbed the “amendment king” in the House of Representatives for passing more amendments than any other member of Congress.
Ranking member on the Senate Budget Committee.
Former student organizer for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
Led the first ever civil rights sit-in in Chicago history to protest segregated housing.
In 1963, Bernie Sanders participated in MLK’s Civil Rights March. One of only 2 sitting US Senators to have heard MLK’s “I have a Dream Speech” in person in the march on Washington, DC.
Former professor of political science at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and at Hamilton College.
Former mayor of Burlington, VT. In a stunning upset in 1981, Sanders won the mayoral race in Burlington, Vermont’s largest city. He shocked the city’s political establishment by defeating a six-term, local machine mayor. Burlington is now reported to be one of the most livable cities in the nation.
Co-founded the Congressional Progressive Caucus and chaired the group for its first 8 years.
(BTW the CPC has for each of the last 7 budget years authored and published a Federal Budget proposal that would have created more jobs and reduced the National Debt significantly faster than the proposals of either political party or the Executive Branch. ‘The People’s Budget’: Analysis of the Congressional Progressive Caucus budget for fiscal year 2018)
Both the NAACP and the NHLA (National Hispanic Leadership Agenda) have given Sanders 100% voting scores during his tenure in the Senate. Earns a D- from the NRA.
1984: Mayor Sanders established the Burlington Community Land Trust, the first municipal housing land-trust in the country for affordable housing. The project becomes a model emulated throughout the world. It later wins an award from Jack Kemp-led HUD.
1991: one of a handful in Congress to vote against authorizing US military force in Iraq. “I have a real fear that the region is not going to be more peaceful or more stable after the war,” he said at the time.
1992: Congress passes Sanders’ first signed piece of legislation to create the National Program of Cancer Registries. A Reader’s Digest article calls the law “the cancer weapon America needs most.” All 50 states now run registries to help cancer researchers gain important insights.
November 1993: Sanders votes against the Clinton-era North American Free Trade Agreement. Returning from a tour of factories in Mexico, Sanders says: “If NAFTA passes, corporate profits will soar because it will be even easier than now for American companies to flee to Mexico and hire workers there for starvation wages.”
July 1996: Sanders is one of only 67 (out of 435, 15%) votes against the discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act, which denied federal benefits to same-sex couples legally married. Sanders urged the Supreme Court to throw out the law, which it did in a landmark 2013 ruling – some 17 years later.
July 1999: Standing up against the major pharmaceutical companies, Sanders becomes the first member of Congress to personally take seniors across the border to Canada to buy lower-cost prescription drugs. The congressman continues his bus trips to Canada with a group of breast cancer patients the following April. These brave women are able to purchase their medications in Canada for almost one-tenth the price charged in the States.
August 1999: An overflow crowd of Vermonters packs a St. Michael’s College town hall meeting hosted by Sanders to protest an IBM plan to cut older workers’ pensions by as much as 50 percent. CBS Evening News with Dan Rather and The New York Times cover the event. After IBM enacts the plan, Sanders works to reverse the cuts, passing a pair of amendments to prohibit the federal government from acting to overturn a federal district court decision that ruled that IBM’s plan violated pension age discrimination laws. Thanks to Sanders’ efforts, IBM agreed to a $320 million legal settlement with some 130,000 IBM workers and retirees.
November 1999: About 10 years before the 2008 Wall Street crash spins the world economy into a massive recession, Sanders votes “no” on a bill to undo decades of financial regulations enacted after the Great Depression. “This legislation,” he predicts at the time, “will lead to fewer banks and financial service providers, increased charges and fees for individual consumers and small businesses, diminished credit for rural America and taxpayer exposure to potential losses should a financial conglomerate fail. It will lead to more mega-mergers, a small number of corporations dominating the financial service industry and further concentration of power in our country.” The House passed the bill 362-57 over Sanders’ objection.
October 2001: Sanders votes against the USA Patriot Act. “All of us want to protect the American people from terrorist attacks, but in a way that does not undermine basic freedoms,” Sanders says at the time. He subsequently votes against reauthorizing the law in 2006 and 2011.
October 2002: Sanders votes against the Bush-Cheney war in Iraq. He warns at the time that an invasion could “result in anti-Americanism, instability and more terrorism.” Hillary Clinton votes in favor of it.
November 2006: Sanders defeats Vermont’s richest man, Rich Tarrant, to be elected to the U.S. Senate. Sanders, running as an Independent, is endorsed by the Vermont Democratic Party and supported by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.
December 2007: Sanders’ authored energy efficiency and conservation grant program passes into law. He later secures $3.2 billion in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for the grant program.
September 2008: Thanks to Sanders’ efforts, funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program funding doubles, helping millions of low-income Americans heat their homes in winter.
February 2009: Sanders works with Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley to pass an amendment to an economic recovery bill preventing Wall Street banks that take taxpayer bailouts from replacing laid-off U.S. workers with exploited and poorly-paid foreign workers.
December 2009: Sanders passes language in the Affordable Care Act to allow states to apply for waivers to implement pilot health care systems by 2017. The legislation allows states to adopt more comprehensive systems to cover more people at lower costs.
March 2010: President Barack Obama signs into law the Affordable Care Act with a major Sanders provision to expand federally qualified community health centers. Sanders secures $12.5 billion in funding for the program which now serves more than 25 million Americans. Another $1.5 billion from a Sanders provision went to the National Health Service Corps for scholarships and loan repayment for doctors and nurses who practice in under-served communities.
July 2010: Sanders works with Republican Congressman Ron Paul in the House to pass a measure as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform bill to audit the Federal Reserve, revealing how the independent agency gave $16 trillion in near zero-interest loans to big banks and businesses after the 2008 economic collapse.
March 2013: Sanders, now chairman of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, and backed by seniors, women, veterans, labor unions and disabled Americans, leads a successful effort to stop a “chained-CPI” proposal supported by Congressional Republicans and the Administration to cut Social Security and disabled veterans’ benefits.
April 2013: Sanders introduces legislation to break up major Wall Street banks so large that the collapse of one could send the overall economy into a downward spiral.
August 2014: A bipartisan $16.5 billion veterans bill written by Sen. Sanders, Sen. John McCain and Rep. Jeff Miller is signed into law by President Barack Obama. The measure includes $5 billion for the VA to hire more doctors and health professionals to meet growing demand for care.
January 2015: Sanders takes over as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee, using the platform to fight for his economic agenda for the American middle class.
January 2015: Sanders votes against the Keystone XL pipeline, which would allow multinational corporation TransCanada to transport dirty tar sands oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.
March 2015: Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) introduced legislation to expand benefits and strengthen the retirement program for generations to come. The Social Security Expansion Act was filed on the same day Sanders and other senators received the petitions signed by 2 million Americans, gathered by the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.
September 2015: Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.), Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.) today introduced bills to ban private prisons [which have been 3 to 4 times as expensive with much higher rates of prisoner abuse, guard injury than government run prisons], reinstate the federal parole system and eliminate quotas for the number of immigrants held in detention.
January 2016: Sanders Places Hold on FDA Nominee Dr. Robert Califf because of his close ties to the pharmaceutical industry and lack of commitment to lowering drug prices. There is no reason to believe that he would make the FDA work for ordinary Americans, rather than just the CEOs of pharmaceutical companies.

———————

ADDENDUM: Several people have asked about Senator Sanders accomplishments since 2016. Which is a tough question, because the US Senate has done almost no legislating since 2016 of any sort. Senator Sanders introduced 397 bills (sponsored or cosponsored) in the current Congress, but like so many others, his bills are sitting on the Majority Leaders’ desk, not being acted upon.

Bernard Sanders Legislation in Process 115th and 116th Congresses.

I believe that the 457 bills he introduced during the 115th Congress all lapsed when that Congress ended.


Amendments, big deal. Lots of senators make amendments. His lack of initiative in authoring original legislation is telling.

What's with the personal attacks today?

"your emotional and irrational"...

So, do we want this to be a sounding board? Or will we personally attack people who differ? What is going on here???
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