Originally Posted By: issodhos
 Originally Posted By: 2wins
 Originally Posted By: issodhos
 Originally Posted By: 2wins
as far as being "collectivist," i suppose that is a fair label to pin on my, although i prefer cooperativist, thank you very much.


There is nothing in libertarian philosophy that would prevent a voluntary association of individuals engaging collectively in an activity. If you wish to have a gardening collective made up of individuals who freely chose to participate in it, your and their right to freedom of association would be recognized.
Yours,
Issodhos
i have read the histories of alternative communities, the true anarchists, and it seems that with each attempt, the groups involved in these experiments are undone by their desire to each have it his or her own way. in the end, they have all gone their own way. conversely, the community or collectivist experiments that seem to work more effectively are those in which common agreements are struck, a core principle is put in place that allows the communities to work in concert. within each system you work with a series of individuals, and personalities, and desires. but with a shared agreement - shall we call them laws? - a social contract, if you will, these groups coexist more effectively, imo.


No one is discussing anarchism, 2wins. As to alternative communities, it is irrelevant whether they fail or succeed. Just as voluntary communes currently are free to form and free to fail in America, so to would voluntary communities within a libertarian-influenced America. As to shared agreement (laws), it would also be a core element of a libertarian-influenced society.
Yours,
Issodhos
perhaps i should be more clear.
 Quote:
Individualist anarchism comprises several traditions[38] which hold that "individual conscience and the pursuit of self-interest should not be constrained by any collective body or public authority."[39] Individualist anarchism is supportive of property being held privately, unlike the social/socialist/collectivist/communitarian wing which advocates common ownership.[40] Individualist anarchism has been espoused by individuals such as Max Stirner, William Godwin,[41] Henry David Thoreau,[42] Josiah Warren and Murray Rothbard.[43][44][45]
what i refer to originates from this tradition. please show me where this is not associated with the position you are advocating.
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sure, you can talk to god, but if you don't listen then what's the use? so, onward through the fog!