Capitol Hill Blue
Panko crusted, deep fried duck livers & cracklin's with home grown Broccoli.
[Linked Image]
paired with Relax Cool Red
red riesling.

Homemade white chocolate chip and walnut cookies for dessert!
Well, after they clean the restrooms at school, sitting down to that nice looking dinner above looks good. [Linked Image]

Oh wait! Poor people don't work . They have have no role models and don't know what work is. Never mind.

smile
Rat on a stick...
Stir fried rat...
etc.
etc.
Spamspamspamspspspam baked beans and spam
Some folks throw away the livers and all that excess neck skin from a duck. Tonight I fried em' up.
From the neck and the rest of the giblets I made Vietnamese duck soup with cellophane noodles. With the drippings from the roast duck I'll make duck gravy and serve that with Mashed potatoes or biscuits,the meat picked off the carcass and the rest of the bones will go to make a little bit of stock for a creamy Duck and Broccoli soup.


Duck livers, huh?

The spousal unit and I were at a Chinese restaurant recently, relaxing over a drink and some appetizers, when the waiter brought a large covered tureen and placed it on the table. As we chatted, the lid of the tureen popped up about half an inch and we could see two beady little black eyes looking at us. At first we thought someone had added something to our cocktails, but a couple of minutes later it happened again.

We called the waiter and told him to watch. Sure enough, it happened a third time. The waiter asked what we order, and I told him chicken surprise. He blinked, then said, "I think I made the mistake. This is a Peking duck."
As I recall, rendered duck fat is supposed to be a gourmet version of chicken fat: Used in recipes to add flavor and to spread on bagels and such. Probably pretty good just spread on fresh biscuits like butter.
My wife and I went to my company's holiday party on Saturday: Chart House right on the beach in Cardiff-by-the-sea. Starters were coconut shrimp, chicken skewers with peanut sauce dip, and bruschetta.

The bruschetta was so good, I tried making some myself last night: I had sourdough toast, very good hothouse tomatoes, fresh red onion, and fresh garlic, but only dried basil. I think it would be much better with more fresh basil and less onion. The onion pretty much drowned out everything else. I'll have to try it again with some pesto spread on the toast and just a bit of minced green onion.
I've got two dozen sweet basil plants about a foot high, I'll soon be able to pick enough to make pesto. Good bruschetta is an art, and not one that I have mastered yet.
I just picked up a Depression Era cookbook and a Black American (Soulfood) Cookbook. I've already found the best bread pudding recipe ever in one of them.
Originally Posted by Greger
I just picked up a Depression Era cookbook and a Black American (Soulfood) Cookbook.
This Depression Era cookbook?[/b]

[b]Indulge in Frugality
Small sauteed chicken breast fillet, Italian wedding soup and a small salad. Zowie the Cocker Spaniel and Bobo the toy Poodle got the very last of the Thanksgiving turkey leftovers mixed in with their Science Diet canned food.

The cats, same thing they have every day, the only thing either of them will ever eat, Meow Mix.

Although Snowflake DID wander over to investigate the chicken fat and trimmings in the pan after dinner. But in the end, she just really wanted a few sniffs and a couple of laps. Then back to the Meow Mix. These are the first cats I've ever had that turn their nose up at people treats. Very strange!
Originally Posted by Checkerboard Strangler
...Bobo the toy Poodle...
ROTFMOL

Hey Jeff, is Bobo a chick magnet for you at the dog park? [Linked Image]

Quote
Lady 1: Look at the ruggedly handsome man
Lady 2: Yes, but he has a toy poodle: Handsome, toy poddle.
Both ladies: Hairdresser!

[Linked Image]
Uhhhh Rick, (A) I think that might be a gay thing.

But if it isn't I would not remember because this is the first tiny dog I've ever had but then there's (B) the fact that it's actually Karen's doggie, and SHE carries him around wherever she goes.

So I'm-a thinkin he might actually be a dude magnet, for HER.
She doesn't realize how much she gets checked out sometimes.
She might be on wheels but that doesn't seem to stop a lot of guys from taking a second or even third (or fourth) look.

But thanky for the flowers anyway, this ruggedly handsome man has now gained sixty pounds from sitting in the editor chair far more than I'd like to.

Bobo is actually quite a homebody. He is such a wuss.
He's afraid of EVERYTHING!! One time Karen crumpled up a piece of paper to throw it in the trash, damn pooch nearly had a heart attack ROTFMOL

"Bobo it's just a piece of paper!"
(dog is sitting there trembling in fear)

I think we got the runt of the litter, he has no intestinal fortitude, poor lil fella.
Zowie on the other hand is quite the social butterfly.
I could probably take HER to the doggie park and pick up a few strays.

But I don't Karen would be too thrilled at the idea tonbricks
But anyway, this was our dinner tonight:


MEATLOAF:

[Linked Image]


No, not that,

[Linked Image]

but that's STILL MEATLOAF:


Open face roast duck and gravy sandwich. On homemade bread.

The cookie recipe on the Nestle's white chocolate chips is awesome!
Mmmmmm, meatloaf, mashed potatoes, and brown gravy. Or just meatloaf with catsup: That's some good eating, either way!

And I love a cold meatloaf slice on sourdough, with catsup & mayo, for lunch the next day.
I didn't know Nestle's even made white chocolate chips!

That's very good news, since I love a good chocolate chip cookie but my stomache acts up when I eat the real thing.
It's white chocolate chips and and walnuts or macadamia nuts. Poor folks use walnuts. The coconut doesn't add anything to the cookies. I recommend leaving it out. Unless someone in your household doesn't eat coconut, then by all means put it in so you don't have to share!
I'm not poor-just plain old middle class, but I had sesame soy chicken, snowpeas steamed with sliced mushrroms and water chestnuts, and fried rice. I had made extra rice the night before, and cooked this up in my wok. Mr. Scoutgal loves this type of dinner. ThumbsUp
Poor like me love Ramen Noodle.

Duck? Couldn't do it... we had four ducks at WH for 5 years... family ducks... Racoon picked them off one at a time,3 of the 4 in five days. Sad days. Now, Turkey buzzards... that's serious FL food.

Peking duck? ROTFMOL

BTW... the tomatoes in the first pic looked real... we haven't had a real tomato since August.

Dog... How'd the dog get in here? I can see fried cat, but not dog.

I only make one special dish... Turkey Soup (regular turkey)...
About 5 pounds of meat in two huge pots... and the whole neighborhood gets a share. Special ingredient... bouillon.

Today... our wonderful local Chinese Restaurant... elegant and with about 80 entree's. 40 desserts. Fresh Salmon, and almost all home cooked stuff... Mongolian Stir Fry, and great sushi.
Incredibly great food, AYCE but expensive... $5.76 and even more if you're not a senior.

I don't get a chance to talk recipes, but love to eat. Am a well know commonsewer of any food.

Greger... in FL, my favorite delicacy is gator balls. We had a catered cajun type dinner at our park that was great... the ladies wouldn't even look at the gator balls.

So much for this gastronome... Time for my cornflakes.

Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
Mmmmmm, meatloaf, mashed potatoes, and brown gravy. Or just meatloaf with catsup: That's some good eating, either way!

And I love a cold meatloaf slice on sourdough, with catsup & mayo, for lunch the next day.

For potatoes we had Jeff's famous "American Fries".
No it's not some political thing. American Fries are just deep fried sliced potatoes, cooked till they're crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
I didn't know Nestle's even made white chocolate chips!

That's very good news, since I love a good chocolate chip cookie but my stomache acts up when I eat the real thing.

Is your stomach racist or something? ROTFMOL
Q. Re: Wonder what the poor folks are eatin' tonight?

A. Hamburger Helper?

Probably not gourmet, or even good for you (chemicals), but this peasant thinks that it tastes good, especially with a vegetable (or two) on the side. I don't even read what's in it, because I don't want to know. However, if you're in a hurry or pushed for time, it's not bad. I usually eat fresh food and produce, and very little "processed" food, except flour and meat, but, if you're pressed for time and money, this stuff tastes good. They also have Hamburger Helper for tuna and chicken, which I've tried and they taste good. I don't know what Julia would say, but this peasant thinks that they taste pretty good.
Joe, I've been known to eat plenty of garbage in my day as well. At Sav-A-Lot I just picked up a pack of 8 frozen beef and bean Chimichangas for $2.99. I've been working on a re-model and have been too tired to do much cooking at suppertime. I just turn on the fryer and in a few minutes supper is ready.
But that hamburger helper stuff, if you'll take the time to read the package you just might find that there is nothing in it you don't already have in your pantry at home. Except the oddball preservatives and chemicals and guar gum(ground guar beans) and modified corn starch which are both used as thickeners.
Have you ever made mashed potatoes and Hamburger gravy?
It used to be a favorite of mine when I was a kid. Sort of a depression era Hamburger helper. An onion, chopped, a pound of hamburger, browned with the onion, add a couple tablespoons flour and stir it in to deglaze the pan, then add water or stock while stirring to make it into gravy.
Salt and pepper to taste and enjoy. Also good with noodles.
'
Originally Posted by Checkerboard Strangler
For potatoes we had Jeff's famous "American Fries".
No it's not some political thing. American Fries are just deep fried sliced potatoes, cooked till they're crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.
You should try Numan's personal "Canadian Fries"!
I use organic russet potatoes, well-washed, and leave the skins on. I cut them up so that they are somewhat thicker than regular french fries. I mix them with peanut oil so they are well-coated, lay them on a cookie-sheet, salt and pepper, and bake at 350�-400� Fahrenheit [Yes, I am ashamed to say that I use the crazy, antiquated measure in cooking---my one metric sin!]. Ten minutes on one side, take them out and turn them, five more minutes on the other side.

Not quite as good as gourmet french fries, but tasty, and a lot less fuss and muss.
Greger, growing up, my grandmother and mother made gravy with the drippings of any meat they cooked. They kept a gallon jar and collected bacon greese for use as a flavor enhancer. My grandmother canned everything. I still remember laying in bed and night and hearing the click of the lid in the old mason jars.

One of my favorites was Sand Plum preserves. Sand Plums were a common wild plant in Oklahoma, and we ate them through the summer time.

Another favorite of those times was "Rat Cheese." My grandparents, like a lot of the poor we knew, received commodities, consisting of surplus cheddar cheese, dried milk (I used this for years and still shudder at the thought of the yellow lumps floating in a glass blue water), and butter.
Quote
Not quite as good as gourmet french fries, but tasty, and a lot less fuss and muss.
If you keep your fryer at the ready it is actually less fuss and muss as well as more energy efficient to fry. The oil will last for weeks if it's occasionally strained to remove impurities and never allowed to overheat.
But speaking of Gourmet Frog Eating Gun Dropper Fries. Emeril has this to say about The Perfect French Fry, there's a little more to it than just cutting the potato into batons and tossing them into hot oil. A little more trouble makes a world of difference.
Ozy, I render my own lard and keep it frozen for such times as I need it, primarily for pie crusts. I either use pan drippings for gravy with a meal or discard them. Duck fat is the one exception to that rule, not a drop of it ever goes to waste.
I think almost everyone kept that container of saved grease on hand back in the day when our parents remembered the Great Depression. My Ma used a coffee can, and used the grease from it for gravies and for frying. When it got full she threw it away. I use butter or olive oil normally to make a roux or even fry a few slices of bacon if I'm in a devil may care mood about healthy eating.
I guess I'm just eccentric (to put it politely): I don't much like fries that have a soft mashed-potato-like center and light yellow skin. I think the best french fries (by far) are the ones that get penetrated by the hot oil and are crispy brown well into the center. Sort of like the crispy part of an order of hash browns.

It's rare to find a place that cooks them that way, and even rarer to find a place that does it consistantly. I suspect most of the time I do get them that way, it is because the cook was busy and left them in the deep fryer "too long".
Quote
Is your stomach racist or something?


Not a bit: Soul Food, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, and just about everything else is fine. Cocoa is my Kryptonite: I love chocolate (as dark as possible) but it gives me intense heartburn for several hours. I was taking Prilosec for about a year, but have found I don't ever need it if I just avoid anything containing cocoa. "White chocolate" seems fine, but of course it's not really chocolate. frown
Quote
Duck? Couldn't do it...
I lost a whole flock of chickens two years ago. But I didn't stop eating chicken. Wild duck breast is far superior to the Pekin Ducks we can get at the supermarket, but much more difficult to obtain. But still. one taste of my roast duck might change your mind about that.

Quote
my favorite delicacy is gator balls.
These are nothing more than Conch Fritters made with gator tail and a few additional Cajun spices, I recommend a Remoulade dipping sauce. Have you had Bang Bang Shrimp at The Bonefish Grill? To die for! and only $5 bucks on Wednesday night.
Quote
"White chocolate" seems fine, but of course it's not really chocolate
.
Au contraire mon frer! White chocolate is made with cocoa butter. It doesn't get more real than that.
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
I guess I'm just eccentric (to put it politely): I don't much like fries that have a soft mashed-potato-like center and light yellow skin. I think the best french fries (by far) are the ones that get penetrated by the hot oil and are crispy brown well into the center. Sort of like the crispy part of an order of hash browns.

It's rare to find a place that cooks them that way, and even rarer to find a place that does it consistantly. I suspect most of the time I do get them that way, it is because the cook was busy and left them in the deep fryer "too long".

Five Guys Burgers. You haven't had a good burger and fries if you haven't gone to Five Guys. Darn. Maybe I should send that to them as a slogan. Luckily for me the closest is about 40 miles away or I would weigh 400 pounds.
Originally Posted by churlpat lives
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
I guess I'm just eccentric (to put it politely): I don't much like fries that have a soft mashed-potato-like center and light yellow skin. I think the best french fries (by far) are the ones that get penetrated by the hot oil and are crispy brown well into the center. Sort of like the crispy part of an order of hash browns.

It's rare to find a place that cooks them that way, and even rarer to find a place that does it consistantly. I suspect most of the time I do get them that way, it is because the cook was busy and left them in the deep fryer "too long".

Five Guys Burgers. You haven't had a good burger and fries if you haven't gone to Five Guys. Darn. Maybe I should send that to them as a slogan. Luckily for me the closest is about 40 miles away or I would weigh 400 pounds.

We have a Five Guys Burgers just down the street from where I live. But it doesn't come close to In-N-Out! That place is always crowded and has the best burgers always made from fresh(never frozen) ingredients. And Five Guys costs about 3 times as much. I don't go to In-N-Out much either. For the same reason that you cite here, Churl! LOL
There is a Mom and Pop burger place near me that makes perfect french fries. thick cut, crispy on the outside soft on the inside, and you get a lot for the price. They have almost anything, from breakfast to dinner. Pretty cheap, and good, too. I love their patty melts, and you can even choose what kin d of cheese you like, too.
'
Considering that french fries are such a simple, unprepossessing food, I wonder why they are so popular. Does it boil down to a simple, atavistic anthropoid delight in fat, carbohydrate and salt?

I imagine texture must be involved, too.
Originally Posted by Greger
Joe, I've been known to eat plenty of garbage in my day as well. At Sav-A-Lot I just picked up a pack of 8 frozen beef and bean Chimichangas for $2.99. I've been working on a re-model and have been too tired to do much cooking at suppertime. I just turn on the fryer and in a few minutes supper is ready.
But that hamburger helper stuff, if you'll take the time to read the package you just might find that there is nothing in it you don't already have in your pantry at home. Except the oddball preservatives and chemicals and guar gum(ground guar beans) and modified corn starch which are both used as thickeners.
It tastes good, and it's fast and easy when you're in a hurry. I hit the wall quite some time ago as far as fast food or junk food goes, but I was genuinely surprised how good HH tastes, especially when pushed for time. I just don't make a habit of using it more than once a week.
Originally Posted by Greger
Have you ever made mashed potatoes and Hamburger gravy?It used to be a favorite of mine when I was a kid. Sort of a depression era Hamburger helper. An onion, chopped, a pound of hamburger, browned with the onion, add a couple tablespoons flour and stir it in to deglaze the pan, then add water or stock while stirring to make it into gravy.
Salt and pepper to taste and enjoy. Also good with noodles.
Yes, and just about any other kind that I got drippings from whatever I was roasting or frying. I'm also very fond of egg noodles and/or mashed potatoes, especially made with garlic and chicken broth. I suspect that food prices will skyrocket before too much longer, but- at least for now- you can eat reasonable good for not too much money. Sometimes for a late night snack, I boil some egg noodles in just enough chicken or beef broth to cook the noodles and absorb most of the liquid. I then add butter and/or soy sauce, and it just hits the spot. Hot pepper sauce also works well.
Originally Posted by numan
'
Considering that french fries are such a simple, unprepossessing food, I wonder why they are so popular. Does it boil down to a simple, atavistic anthropoid delight in fat, carbohydrate and salt?

I imagine texture must be involved, too.

Numan~seriously, I think you're hypothesis is true! And I've cooked potatoes using your method, and it always comes out very well. In fact, it is my kids' favorite way to have their potatoes.
Fried eggs, yellow grits, pork jowl bacon and biscuits with butter and homemade peach preserves.
Sometimes breakfast for dinner hits the spot.
A cold front blew through today so I made Hot Cocoa for dessert. With Hershey's Special Dark dutched cocoa and fresh whipped cream.
Sorry, PIA, but there is a whole world of hot White Chocolate beverages you can experiment with if you miss this winter treat. My favorite of those has a shot of espresso in it which makes it more chocolaty without adding cocoa powder.

I'm not vegetarian. I like it with pork, although I suspect beef or chicken would do as well. Also, if you haven't used it, try basmati with it.
Basmati is Indian Rice, Joe. The Thai folks use Jasmine, I kind of agree with you though.
These gals would need to step it up a notch in the Thai place I worked. neither knife or chuan skills are very impressive. I bet the rice is to die for though.

Thai Fried rice

2-3 tablespoons oil
small handful julienned onion
cook onion, stirring with chuan til it begins to burn slightly
1/2teaspoon of minced garlic (careful it spatters)
1 cup cut up chicken, pork, beef shrimp etc.
Cook and stir
crack in an egg and stir
add ground Thai Pepper(cayenne) to taste
toss in chopped tomatoes, bok choy, whatever veggies suit your fancy. stir
add rice, add a tablespoon sugar, add a ladle of stir fry sauce
stir until blended
taste
add soy sauce, red pepper, sugar, or vinegar to balance flavors
stir
scoop out onto plate, shake on black pepper generously and garnish with sliced scallions.

For Pineapple Fried rice add about 8 chunks of pineapple with the veggies and a little pineapple juice. garnish with more pineapple.

Thanks for the recipe. I've never worked in a Thai restaurant, but I've eaten in a few. I realize that basmati is an Indian rice. I prefer basmati, which is why I suggested it. Besides Indian dishes, I serve it with my Mexican, Chinese, American dishes.

The lady is a street food vendor, much like the hot dog, pretzel, and other food vendors I once frequented years ago. I only wish that she had a cart next to one of them, because I would have enjoyed Thai food earlier. btw- is it just me or is it that you can't get a decent hot dog south of NYC?
But Greger and I am sure you know this-it is important that the rice be cooked hours (or a day) prior, cooled or refrigerated, and then added to the mix.

Otherwise one runs the risk of a sticky or gooey rice clump.
Thanks but no thanks Ken. Right out of the steamer, or whichever method you use is the best way to go. The rice gets glued together once it cools. Lumpy rice can be very frustrating when you are in a hurry. You've got to put down the chuan, grab a dinner fork and search through the fried rice for lumps. Customah no like lumps.
Originally Posted by Ken Hill
Otherwise one runs the risk of a sticky or gooey rice clump.
Like what you find in kitty litter?
'
I never have any problem with sticky rice---unless, of course, I want some sticky, glutinous rice for some delectable Chinese dish. It is absurdly easy to have cooked rice in which each grain keeps itself to itself. I always buy rice in 10 or 20 kilogram bags, and merely spend a minute swirling water through it and thoroughly washing it until the rinse water is clear, and the rice free of any rice dust.

Being as patriotic an American as I am, I used consistently to buy California or Texas long-grain Patna rice -- until I read some articles about American rice being more polluted with toxic chemicals than the rice from those little, poorly regulated Asian countries.

I imagine it is from growing it in land that for decades was asphixiated with toxins used in the cultivation of cotton.

Anyway, the Constitution is not a suicide pact, so I switched to rice from healthier countries.
I picked up a bag of sweet rice this week. Also called glutinous rice. It's used mostly to make Sticky Rice, a Thai dessert dish served with mango and a rich coconut cream sauce. Black Sticky Rice is another more nutty tasting dessert.
How do you think that it would work in rice pudding?
Sticky Rice is essentially "rice pudding" it's made with Coconut milk because Thai folks don't use dairy products. It's served with mango instead of raisins. I suspect that it would work very well with a typical western rice pudding recipe.
I love rice pudding! That Thai recipe sounds really good. Greger~do you have a recipe for that?
Thai Sticky Rice

2 cups Thai sweet rice(glutinous rice)
1 can good coconut milk
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt
Fresh or frozen mango

In a microwave safe glass casserole. Cover rice with water and soak 10 minutes to half an hour. Drain off water until rice is barely covered, add 1/4 can of coconut milk. Cook covered in microwave on high for 10 minutes then let sit with lid on for ten more minutes.

In a saucepan warm the rest of the coconut milk, the salt and the brown sugar until brown sugar is melted.

Pour over rice, fluff with fork, serve with slices of fresh mango.

Alternately with frozen mango you can make a mango sauce with 2 cups of mango cubes, a can of coconut milk, 1/2 cup brown sugar. Bring this to a boil and add cornstarch mixed with water to thicken it.
Ladle this over servings of the sweetened Sticky rice


traditionally Sicky Rice is prepared in a straw hat in a spittoon. It looks like this: [Linked Image]
Or it can be steamed in a muslin bag or a pillowcase. But the microwave beats the hell out of the traditional methods.

Thank you, Greger!
Greger, that looks really good. I like rice pudding, but only made it for myself once many years ago. I think it's time again. I'll try the sticky rice.
Here's an interesting option for what the po' folks could be eating...

Free food

Seems like it might be an evil Collectivist thing, though. Hmm
Now if someone can just show me how to grow cilantro successfully. Every year I plant it and it comes up bolting. So this year I am really really NOT going to try again. I just go to the grocery store and buy it when I need it.

Oh. Speaking of food, I've been meaning to post this:

I had an extra bag of cranberries in the fridge and wondered what to do with them. So I tossed them in a saucepan with a half or 3/4 cup of sugar, a finely cut up juice orange, and a big handful of diced pineapple. I cooked it until all the cranberries were popped open, let it cool, and tried to think of something to do with the concoction.

3.14159 + 2.7182818 = Pie

I prepared a pie crust, dotted it with Tbsp-sized globs of the concoction, and then poured around the globs a mixture of about a cup of sour cream, a cup of sugar, and 3-4 Tbsp of flour.

I didn't put a top crust on and baked the pie for 30 minutes at 375.

It was yummy. I had to use a spatula to fight off the kids until Peggy and I could have some for dessert.

You can try this with many fruits. I made one this AM that has strawberries all pointing upward out of the white filler, looks like little red mountains in the snow.
Just for what it's worth. Cranberries, like all other berries can simply be frozen. No special preparation, just toss 'em in the freezer. Unlike other berries though, the thawed cranberries are indistinguishable from fresh berries.
How do you make your crusts Churl? I do all butter but with an added 1/4 cup of freshly rendered lard.
I'd never considered a Cranberry pie, and don't really know if I'd make one. But adding a few cranberries to an apple pie might be interesting. I like my strawberry pies on a cookie crust.
Logtroll,
I think the municipal vegetable gardens are an excellent idea. Grass and flowers as well as most other ornamental landscaping are a complete waste of good soil. City workers and planners should get busy on this. A time may come when it's important.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Logtroll,
I think the municipal vegetable gardens are an excellent idea. Grass and flowers as well as most other ornamental landscaping are a complete waste of good soil. City workers and planners should get busy on this. A time may come when it's important.

Some of us in this high desert community (6000' elev, 15" annual rainfall) have been trying to get the town to do water harvesting using clever, but simple, stormwater runoff catchment techniques. Our rains often come in buckets but at wide temporal intervals. Our meager moisture is shed from the landscape from roofs and streets (with curbs and gutters, just to make sure it all leaves as quickly and efficiently as possible causing flooding and lots of erosion somewhere downstream). Meanwhile, we pay to pump water from deep underground up the hills to water sparse gardens (and friggin' lawns, if you can believe it).

Anyway, there are many small, dusty waste ground areas (including the yards of people who weren't as stupid as the lawn people) that could be irrigated by collecting water from roofs and letting runoff escape the streets through well-designed curb cuts, diverting it into rock mulched swales for deep percolation into the soil. Such places would make dandy neighborhood vegetable patches and reduce community water costs (coming and going) to boot!

The problem is in getting evil Collectivists to comprehend any issue that is more than 1mm deep, and in getting the Capitalists to allow anything to be free. And the Individualists are all a bunch of weirdos. Crikey!

Frankly, I don't know how we survive as a species. But I like to try to make the best of it when possible.

"How do you make your crusts Churl?"

blush I confess. I make a trip to the store and get the frozen ones. Thaw = prepare. coffee
A Hot-Spicy Soup For Your Cold
Florida strawberries just came in to Aldi's. The best I've had in five years... ripe all the way through (red)... not like the white centers that taste like tofu. And $1.39 qt. even better.

Been thinking about best food... Turkey necks. Without a question. Out of the freshly cooked turkey.

Inexpensive?... How about shepherd's pie? Made with ground raccoon or possum.
Yeah, ground raccoon is far preferable to the tree variety.
Originally Posted By: itstarted
Florida strawberries just came in to Aldi's. The best I've had in five years... ripe all the way through (red)... not like the white centers that taste like tofu. And $1.39 qt. even better.

Been thinking about best food... Turkey necks. Without a question. Out of the freshly cooked turkey.

Inexpensive?... How about shepherd's pie? Made with ground raccoon or possum.
Yes, if things get bad enough and there are always, unlike strawberries, seem to be enough of them around. During the last Great Depression, possum was a supplemental protein sources, and there is still a yearly festival honoring this noble critter for his contribution. I never had possum, but I hear that they're supposed to taste like chicken bacon. Squirrel is still popular in these parts, especially squirrel hash. Incidentally, turkey necks make a great turkey stock/broth.
Thanks for the link... I went to the magazine that features the festival... Possum Festival Magazine
Delightful!... especially the advertisers... Kentucky Fried etc.

In Illinois, we celebrate a different animal... the Burgoo!
Held in Utica, Il on Columbus Day each year... about 7 miles from my home.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Panko crusted, deep fried duck livers & cracklin's with home grown Broccoli.

paired with Relax Cool Red
red riesling.

Homemade white chocolate chip and walnut cookies for dessert!


that's a lot of dead ducks!!
I tried not to eat the duck livers but I was told if I didn't eat them it would be counted against me at state tax time. It took me a while to figure out the dead duck shuns were against me.

Quote:
It took me a while to figure out the dead duck shuns were against me

Gotta stop goin' to these eatin' sites...
leads to too much extra worry... Sugar Should Be Regulated As Toxin, Researchers Say

Quote:
They said that over the past 50 years, sugar consumption has tripled worldwide. That's also helped contribute to the obesity epidemic - so much so that there are 30 percent more obese people in this world than there are malnourished people.


Just like cigarettes and alcohol...

Ya think?
Quote:
Wonder what the poor folks are eatin' tonight?


Romney: "I'm Not Concerned About the Very Poor"

Shut it greger, Romney dont give a f*ck

Link
There must be a pork glut these days: My wife keeps buying spiral-cut hams at Costco, even though we have already polished off a couple over the last month. She says she can't resist because they are only 99 cents/pound.
Enjoy it while it lasts. Prices have been really good around here on pork loin, Boston butt, pork roast, center cut chops, ribs, and ham. The price of beef, however, keeps rising. Incidentally, I had pork vindaloo for dinner.
The "Poor Folks" are probably eatng better than my family, if today's visit to a new Walmart Super Store is any indicator ! We also noted selections in the grocery section seem biased toward Hispanic culture and whatever comprises "yuppie/yippie/youth tastes. Most unusual for this highly competitive market ! >Mech
Speaking of Walmart... Grocery Prices here are skyrocketing. We watch our food bill closely, and are finding that increases or reduced packaging/quantity/weight factors have added about 20% since October.

The fear that local merchants had when Walmart came in... that after Walmart owned the market, the prices would rise uncontrollably seems to be coming true. Our small town has lost two Major Markets (Jewel, Econofoods).

KMart, Target, Big Lots, The Dollar Tree, and even our Menard's and Rural King (like Lowes amd Tractor Supply) are selling food... but all at high prices.

What passes for Farmers' Market has prices beyond the reach of middle class. Lettuce @ $1.75/head, tomatoes @ $2.50/lb.,etc.
Organic be damned.

Even our local Aldi's and Sav a Lot prices have increased, but are still about 25% or more below Walmart.

Costco and Sams are too distant, and our quantity needs are less than offered anyway.

The strangest part is that no one seems to talk about these price increases.

Commodities and Energy... not subject to supply/demand.

Your thoughts on food prices?

I've always assumed that food prices were directly related to energy prices. Diesel fuel, both on and off road, electricity to process and keep food fresh, fertilizer requires a huge amount of energy both in mining and synthesizing. And good old corporate price gouging is always a factor too.
When the peasants are down...kick 'em.

Blessed Imolc everyone! I've been working on the feast for three days now. We'll start with a cheeseboard featuring a Spanish Manchego made from sheep's milk, a couple of Irish cheeses and a few other nice sampling of imported and domestic artisan cheeses, Some rugelach filled with ground sunflower seeds and Pecorino Romano cheese.
Then a rich lamb stew with Irish soda bread, next a salad of Spring greens with a papaya chutney dressing.
The entree will be lambchops with a balsamic citrus reduction sauce, neeps and tatties and Brussels sprouts. Afterward home made ice cream pecan pie or chocolate lava cake. I've also made some butterscotch pudding just in case someone hasn't got room for a large dessert.
Then perhaps a glass of port, or whiskey.

Food prices be damned, a good feast is not to be skimped on.

I made biscuits with sausage gravy for breakfast yesterday. It turned out very tasty. Mr. Scoutgal ate about half(I made 8 biscuits-NOT Pillsbury), I had two left over, so this morning, I reheated them, and had them with homemade blueberry jam and butter.
Do the neep and tatties donors complain? Ouch!
Greger~Could you please post your butterscotch pudding recipe here? laugh

Quote:
Do the neep and tatties donors complain? Ouch!

THat's Yellow Turnips(Rutabagas) and potatoes mashed together... rolleyes

Scout, I just grabbed a pudding recipe from google. The one by David Lebovitz looked the best but I wasn't sure about putting whiskey in it so I went with Joy of Baking
Paula Dean's Molten Lava Cake recipe is to die for and easy to make.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
Do the neep and tatties donors complain? Ouch!

THat's Yellow Turnips(Rutabagas) and potatoes mashed together... rolleyes

Scout, I just grabbed a pudding recipe from google. The one by David Lebovitz looked the best but I wasn't sure about putting whiskey in it so I went with Joy of Baking
Paula Dean's Molten Lava Cake recipe is to die for and easy to make.


Anything Paula makes is awesome. Her health is her business and she's always said to adjust her recipes for your own health needs.
Thanks, Greger! ThumbsUp
Annette Larkins looks much younger than her years Watch the video! Wow! I'm almost tempted to pull my stuffed peppers from the oven. Almost.
Originally Posted By: Siannan
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
Do the neep and tatties donors complain? Ouch!

THat's Yellow Turnips(Rutabagas) and potatoes mashed together... rolleyes

Scout, I just grabbed a pudding recipe from google. The one by David Lebovitz looked the best but I wasn't sure about putting whiskey in it so I went with Joy of Baking
Paula Dean's Molten Lava Cake recipe is to die for and easy to make.


Anything Paula makes is awesome. Her health is her business and she's always said to adjust her recipes for your own health needs.


I agree. Southern people been making something similar for years. Did anybody in the known world ever, ever think that Southern food was not fattening? I wish they'd leave Paula alone. You know they aren't saying a damn thing about Mr. Robbins of Baskin and Robbins having diabetes. Who gives a damn? If in this day and age people don't know that Twinkies might not be something you want to eat every day then I don't think the rest of us should help them.

That does it. I'm jonesing for grits and cathead biscuits for breakfast in the morning.
If you want them grits really Southern Style you'd serve 'em over or under a couple of eggs fried over easy in bacon grease. As I recall though, Mick, you're a vegan so you just eat 'em "poor folks style" without no eggs nor bacon.

I've just about got a vegan ice cream recipe worked out for my daughter. She can't have eggs or dairy. I'm liking it better than real ice cream.
Many moons ago, I stopped at a Waffle House outside Atlanta for breakfast. The waitress asked me if I wanted hash browns or grits with my eggs. "Grits, please!" I figured it was time to see what a grit looked like. Hey, sum-beach, I thought to myself when the waitress placed the plate in front of me, I've seen this before. Up north it's called polenta, and they charge you more for it. At any rate, I became a grits convert. I've had Hoover's Grits for breakfast the past two days. I use chicken broth instead of water and serve with butter.
Originally Posted By: Greger
If you want them grits really Southern Style you'd serve 'em over or under a couple of eggs fried over easy in bacon grease. As I recall though, Mick, you're a vegan so you just eat 'em "poor folks style" without no eggs nor bacon.

I've just about got a vegan ice cream recipe worked out for my daughter. She can't have eggs or dairy. I'm liking it better than real ice cream.


Greger. I gave up vegan and am now Paleo. I missed meat so much I would lick meat packages at the store, this weekend I making Pig Candy with thick bacon.

Vegan ice cream? Soy or coconut base?
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Many moons ago, I stopped at a Waffle House outside Atlanta for breakfast. The waitress asked me if I wanted hash browns or grits with my eggs. "Grits, please!" I figured it was time to see what a grit looked like. Hey, sum-beach, I thought to myself when the waitress placed the plate in front of me, I've seen this before. Up north it's called polenta, and they charge you more for it. At any rate, I became a grits convert. I've had Hoover's Grits for breakfast the past two days. I use chicken broth instead of water and serve with butter.


We will convert the world, one grit at a time. I'm glad you like it Joe. It's damn good isn't it. Cheese grits are also fantastic. Shrimp and grits are the staff of life.
Every other Sunday morning I drive to Asheville to donate platelets and plasma at the Red Cross and I started going to Waffle House for breakfast, because I loved their waffles and their grits. Then early one morning I watched as one of the cooks prepared a big batch of grits. It was perhaps a gallon in size, and he put a whole pound of butter in it!

So I stopped eating the grits as often. Then one day I was chatting with the people there and they mentioned they were out of half-and-half, and it was going to be a real problem. I asked why. Did you know that they make their regular waffles by mixing the dry waffle mixture with half-and-half?

So I switched to eating buttermilk waffles.

Then they took the buttermilk waffles off the menu.

Now when I go to Asheville I stop at Denny's where they have a senior fit omelet, egg whites, a small amount of cheese, mushrooms, onions, spinach, served alongside a bowl of fruit and a bowl of oatmeal.
Quote:

Vegan ice cream? Soy or coconut base?


Coconut and almond milk, with a banana added.
I'm getting some ice crystals in it though and need to up the fat content I think, either by reduction of the liquid and/or emulsifying almond butter or coconut oil into it.

I want to make a sugar free version for myself and will probably just add some high quality butter to mine.

Ted-There is no reason to add that much butter to grits. They probably do that in the restaurant to keep it from hardening. Normally it's cooked with no butter at all then served with a pat of butter, salt, and pepper. Or with a fried egg or two...all mashed together with your fork.
Not sure if I can honestly compare grits to polenta...!
I'm Italian and hail from the East Coast and now that I am in Texas I know what grits are.
The similarity stops abruptly just after the time you finish soaking them in water!
Italian Grits What part of Italy is your family from? I grew up in a predominantly Italian area where most were from the south or either Sicily. I was made an honorary Italian around 4th or 5th grade. However, there were some Italians from the north- we called them Germans. Polenta wasn't as popular a menu item as pasta or pizza, but was available. The Italian food was great! The Greek, Polish, Jewish, German, Hungarian, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, etc. wasn't too bad, either. Talk about a melting pot- and it tasted good. I really enjoyed those Italian Church festivals. The sausage and pepper sandwiches, grinders, hoagies, submarines, heroes, etc. Close to heaven as I'll get.

The only appreciable difference that I noticed between polenta and grits is that polenta is ground finer and costs more. Grits with chili is also mighty fine.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Every other Sunday morning I drive to Asheville to donate platelets and plasma at the Red Cross and I started going to Waffle House for breakfast, because I loved their waffles and their grits. Then early one morning I watched as one of the cooks prepared a big batch of grits. It was perhaps a gallon in size, and he put a whole pound of butter in it!

So I stopped eating the grits as often. Then one day I was chatting with the people there and they mentioned they were out of half-and-half, and it was going to be a real problem. I asked why. Did you know that they make their regular waffles by mixing the dry waffle mixture with half-and-half?

So I switched to eating buttermilk waffles.

Then they took the buttermilk waffles off the menu.

Now when I go to Asheville I stop at Denny's where they have a senior fit omelet, egg whites, a small amount of cheese, mushrooms, onions, spinach, served alongside a bowl of fruit and a bowl of oatmeal.

Ted Remington. I only stop in every now and again at RR (I used to be around regular) and I can't remember what your "first" name was before you disclosed your real name.
Doesn't matter really...
But I have to say. What? You're going to Asheville and eating at Waffle House and Dennys? Cripe, man. Why?
This is a good eating place. Try Early Girl and several other places. Stone ground grits. Locally grown stuff with no additives. Good stuff.
Chains thrive on fat and grease and whatever.
Asheville is not a place to eat at a chain. That shocks me.

I can nearly promise you that the "healthy" eating at Denny's isn't really.
But then. I'm cynical and believe in eating locally grown organic and know what's in it.
Denny's healthy? Probably not.
Note to self. Send olyve and email off line to let her know someone has hacked her RR account and is posting in her name. Can't really be her. Although it does have that crazy, warped healthy eating "meme" about it . . .
Hmmm.

Oh, dang it! Just dumped my biscuits and gravy all over my keyboard! Dadgum bib mounted food tray they sold me at Denny's broke again!
olyve, if you want a good horseradish (other than grating your own), try FARMERS. It's genuinely good. They have a tamed down moderate version that is absolutely delicious. Perfect topping for a hard boiled egg. They also have the hot stuff, too, which I suspect will not only clear your nasal cavities, but also your frontal lobes. The local PIG carries it, so I suspect you can get it, too.
Olyve:

I agree wholeheartedly. But since I am retired the only time I can go to Asheville regularly for blood donations is early on Sunday mornings. NOTHING is open except the chains. Early Girl, which I like, opens at 9. Perhaps I will work to change my appt time to 11, but those slots are usually always filled by people with more "seniority" than I have. And I am currently standing at 83.5 gallons donated!

Every other day of the week I have to clean, cook, ride herd on two teenagers with ADHD, do the yard work, do the laundry, etc. Being retired is hard work!

But you did open my eyes, m'dear. As my M-I-L says, nothing beats a try like a failure. I've just been going with the flow, perhaps it's time to change the direction.

Thanks.

Originally Posted By: loganrbt
Oh, dang it! Just dumped my biscuits and gravy all over my keyboard! Dadgum bib mounted food tray they sold me at Denny's broke again!
Logan, you doddering old fool! LOL

Yes tis me! I just missed you so!!

Originally Posted By: loganrbt
Can't really be her. Although it does have that crazy, warped healthy eating "meme" about it . . .
Hmmm.
nono

But he's right, Ted. I do have a bit of a health thing going. I guess I have to start calling myself a "senior" too now that I'm in my 60s. I hate it though! That word I mean. I am glad to still be here.

I didn't mean to sound harsh, Ted. I just love Asheville and as I do here at home, I also really believe in shopping and eating locally. We have a wealth of good healthy eating options where I live too.
I do see your point and it sounds like you chose the right option considering the slimness of your options early on a Sunday morning. You'd be dealing with the tourist crowds too on a weekend.
I live about 3 1/2 hours south of you in Athens, Ga, a neat place too and we come to Asheville about twice a year to concerts generally. We stay at the Downtown Inn and walk everywhere we go.

Logan, as you well know, I am underinsured (though Affordable Care Act made that better....soon to go away of course) so at my age it is important to eat healthy and stay healthy! Government doesn't like people my age!

Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
And I am currently standing at 83.5 gallons donated!
Bow

Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Every other day of the week I have to clean, cook, ride herd on two teenagers with ADHD, do the yard work, do the laundry, etc. Being retired is hard work!
I'm semi retired. Yes it is!

Sorry for the off topics, mods.
It's just good to see you pass through Olyve, and you can go off topic all you want in a thread like this.

My Easter Dinner was Saturday night. Friday night at midnight I put a fresh 12 pound picnic ham in the oven at 200 degrees. It had a dry rub made up mostly of brown sugar with paprika and a variety of herbs and spices. It cooked all night long and most of the day. At 3:30 Saturday afternoon I turned oven down to 140 degrees, wrapped it in foil, and put it back in the oven until 8 that evening when it was time to "carve" it.
We started the meal with a salad from my garden, the appetizer was grilled portabello mushrooms, then seared Ahi tuna with thin slices of raw tuna. The principal course was the pulled pork with potatoes and green beans from my garden.
We finished with home made ice cream.
Wow... Hi Olyve...Missed you a lot...Y'all come back and see us heah? New guys... She's the sweetest and nicest and adds that kind of gentility to our sometimes rough edge chats.

............................................
Now on to Easter Ham... Greger... you ain'ta gonna like me...
9 lb, smoked butt. Oven @325degrees for 2 hours... then out and slobbered with Aldi's lite pancake syrup and fresh pineapple slices. Back into the oven uncovered for another 1/2 hour... Sliced then poured the syrup overflow on the slices.

I am the local HERO!!! (sadly the only spices we have are lemon pepper and beef boullion (if that's a spice?).

Perhaps next time I'll try Ham ala Gregoire! smile

PS... fresh veggies coming up if the dandelions cooperate.
We had our traditional Easter ham dinner, with homemade mac and cheese, tri-tip, au gratin potatoes, corn, green beans and rolls. We had birthday cake for dessert, because it was also my MIL's birthday. The mac and cheese is from an old southern cookbook that I had lying around, and had given to my daughter. I do not like mac and cheese. I did take one bite, because she worked so hard on it. It was a lovely holiday, with almost all of my family, so I am a happy camper. grin
Quote:
so I am a happy camper.


and that's why we luv ya!
Originally Posted By: itstarted
Quote:
so I am a happy camper.


and that's why we luv ya!


Awwww-thanks, Cousin It!
Originally Posted By: olyve
But he's right, Ted. I do have a bit of a health thing going. I guess I have to start calling myself a "senior" too now that I'm in my 60s. I hate it though! That word I mean. I am glad to still be here.
Remember when 30 seemed old?
Oh Gosh, shucks, It. Thanks for the kind words. *blush*
Sounding a bit suthern your own self these days. Handing around some of them in Florida, are you?

LOL. Joe, yes! I can (barely) remember when 30 was old. Sigh....
Strange itnit?
That said, 60 has really thrown me for a loop. Wow.
Like I said, I'm glad to be here but daummmmm.

Btw, thanks for the tip on that horseradish, I forgot to say. I think we DO still have a Piggly around here somewhere. I'll check it out. I love horseradish.

Y'all's Eastern dinners sound yummy!
I didn't need to find out ham has pink slime in it though. Ugh. No wonder I have a hard time eating meat anymore!

What are poor people eating?
Cheap American food that is full of fat, sugar and salt.
Beans and rice and yes grits would be good without all the "enhanced" taste. We need to relearn how to eat the plain basic stuff.
Originally Posted By: olyve

LOL. Joe, yes! I can (barely) remember when 30 was old. Sigh....
Strange itnit?
That said, 60 has really thrown me for a loop. Wow.
Like I said, I'm glad to be here but daummmmm.
olyve, there are two ages: You're either too young or too old.

Originally Posted By: olyve
Btw, thanks for the tip on that horseradish, I forgot to say. I think we DO still have a Piggly around here somewhere. I'll check it out. I love horseradish.
I love horseradish, too. This stuff is good. I doubt that just Piggly Wiggly carries it. Check around. I'm sure that your market can order it. It's good.

Originally Posted By: olyve
What are poor people eating?
Hamburger Helper.
Hamburger Helper.

Shudder!
Not to be mixing threads but, have you ever tried Hamburger Helper with pink slime? Mmm, mmm, good!
Or, squirrel? Hmmmmmm, squirrel...
Squirrel is pretty tough. It's best used to make a broth for soup or stew. It should be slowly simmered with root vegetables and herbs. The meat can then be stripped from the bones minced and used to make "Squirrel Helper" with some of the broth, or better yet, Squirrel Gravy to serve over sweet potatoes.
Squirrel hash is the featured dish in these parts. A number of these good ol' boys grew up hunting, including squirrels. If they didn't get that squirrel, no lunch. There are a lot of very good shots around here.
I recall reading about some folks in the hinterlands mixing squirrel brains with their scrambled eggs. Apparently tasty, but unfortunately for them, squirrels have a high infestation rate with a prion like Mad Cow Disease and you can't destroy its infectivity by cooking.

Several victims ingested such whopping doses, they succumbed within months.
My grandma hunted for most of their meat when they lived in the rural areas of the south. Squirrel was on the menu often. My grandma could "bark" a squirrel, and after she caught a few, she would make them into a stew. My mother liked squirrel stew. I have never partaken, and after PIA's post I will never. crazy
Wow. I have to say eating squirrel in the south is new to me. (please tell me you're teasing Greger)
Your grandmother hunted their meat? Gosh, Scout, you're a good ten years younger me (maybe more?). Where did they live?
Still....coon, possum....I've heard stories about them and eating in the south but figgered that was before my time.
Uck.

I cannot imagine killing and eating Elmer, my squirrel who thinks he can out smart me at the bird feeder.

Really? Squirrel?
Ugh.
That's just awful.
Olyve, I've eaten squirrel and it's okay. 'Possum and coon are soul food classics but I've never tried either. I've had armadillo on several occasions and a variety of wild fowl.
Wild duck breast is one of the most incredibly delicious things I've ever eaten and the best steak I ever ate was venison.
I never heard of eating squirrel brains, but canned pork brains used to be available and the are quite good with scrambled eggs. I'm not sure whether they are still available though and I have it from a good source that the local slaughterhouse is no longer allowed to sell pig heads to brain eaters.
How about road kill?
Wausau Possum Festival Annual tribute to the critter that was one of the main protein sources during the Great Depression.
Quote:
How about road kill?


I roasted a 60 pound road kill pig once...
Did you find it or hit it? Roadkill Bill
I et beaver oncet. More specifistically, I et tail.

(Castor canadensis)
Quote:
Did you find it or hit it?
My neighbor hit it on the way home and brought it to me...
Wild Turkeys often cross the road in front of me out here. I've been trying to hit one for years but no luck yet.
Well ok.
After this last little bit of conversation took place I had my chipmunk, my squirrel(s?), and finally my (apparently now resident) possum show up, very cutely I might add, to my bird feeders.
You'd have to come through me to get to them to kill.

But that said, if you're going to eat meat, at the end of the day what's the difference if it's a cute one you see often or just an old scrounger?
Or a cow or pig that has been groomed for the kill?

I didn't plan not eating meat. It (and ALL THE PINK SLIME!! Lack of regulations.....keeping it clean and....healthy) just happened.
Ya know?

I was just about to post that when I stopped and thought.
No. For me, as I age, I just don't want to kill something to eat just to give me pleasure.
I would like to think somebody wouldn't do that to me.
Poor folks will eat just about anything, Olyve. We are all fortunate that we don't need to go to those extremes to stay fed. Just because you don't think of a carrot as cute and cuddly doesn't mean it isn't a living thing. I just don't draw any lines between animals and vegetables when it comes to taking a life to feed myself. wink
Quote:
I et beaver oncet. More specifistically, I et tail.

Taint right log. I mean--what about them starvin folk?
Originally Posted By: logtroll
I et beaver oncet. More specifistically, I et tail.

(Castor canadensis)


ROTFMOL
Olyve~My grandma had my mother later in age. She was the 7th out of 9 kids. They lived in Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Missouri before moving to the Central Valley of California. They were migrant workers. Grandma hunted meat, because she couldn't afford to buy meat. She only had a buckboard for transportation until around 1950. Never had indoor plumbing(my mother and grandmother) until they came to California. I cannot imagine living that way. I never did. I never ate squirrel, chipmunk, oppossum, bear or coon. Only fish, poultry, beef, pork, lamb and veal. My mom had eaten oppossum, but didn't care for it. She did, however, love pickled pigs' feet-I thought they were gross!

She also used to take leftover cornbread, crumble it up into a tall glass with chopped green onion and pour buttermilk over it. Yuck!
I tried to learn to like buttermilk....The acidity that makes buttermilk so useful in baking and tenderizing meat also unfortunately makes it unpalatable for most modern Americans.
I could probably make it through a glass of cornbread onions and buttermilk(with salt and pepper) but my opinion of buttermilk wouldn't change.
That was one of my mother's favorite snacks....cornbread and buttermilk!
She was a city girl (Atlanta) though she sure knew some poverty. I'm not sure she ate much chittlins and things like that but they did exist on beans, greens and cornbread. Not much meat. Occasionally fried chicken legs.
My father was born on a farm in Kansas so grew their own meat.
My grandmother btw was one of 20 kids.

I duuno even I can relate to some of the stuff you're talking about, Scout so point well taken. When I was a little girl we tried living in Kansas and farming for a short time. We had no indoor bathroom and the telephone was one of those crank style party line things.
But it was also the time of the beginnings of fast cheap convenient foods and when we moved back to Atlanta that is a lot of what we ate. Boxed mac cheese, frozen fried shrimp, pork and beans.
Olyve, I think we grew up during the age of mediocrity.
Those post war years when cheap white bread replaced home made, when canned beans replaced homegrown and the TV Dinner was invented. During those years America lost touch with where food came from and lost the (unpleasant) knack for wringing a chicken's neck, cleaning a fish, or slaughtering a hog.
We became squeamish about food and taught our children to be even more squeamish. Far too many have learned to live only on packaged and processed food and are completely removed from the actual preparation of food as our grandparents knew it.
'
"The Age of Mediocrity," eh?

A friend of mine calls it the "Age of Great Stupidity," and I think he is right -- and, IMO, it is getting stupider and more brainwashed all the time,

I would like to think that people are getting more sensible about what they shove into their mouths, but I am not hopeful -- people are so easily stampeded into one fad or another by the Brainwashing Machine.
Never has it been more true :

"You dig your grave with your teeth."
You got it. I wouldn't be too surprised that in the future if country folk mounted cow catchers on their pickups to "bag" a deer or two on their way home from church.
If you haven't already seen it, you may want to check out Idiocracy ,the movie. My friends (all two of them) were aghast that I liked it. Granted, that you might get a headache from watching it, but....
Originally Posted By: Greger
Olyve, I've eaten squirrel and it's okay. 'Possum and coon are soul food classics but I've never tried either. I've had armadillo on several occasions and a variety of wild fowl.
Wild duck breast is one of the most incredibly delicious things I've ever eaten and the best steak I ever ate was venison.
I never heard of eating squirrel brains, but canned pork brains used to be available and the are quite good with scrambled eggs. I'm not sure whether they are still available though and I have it from a good source that the local slaughterhouse is no longer allowed to sell pig heads to brain eaters.


You will be happy to learn that three ounces of pig brains contain 2,169 mg, or 723% of the recommended daily allowance for cholesterol, according to this.
!

But it has 0 carbs...;)
Just like all my cars except the 29 MB.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Originally Posted By: Greger
Olyve, I've eaten squirrel and it's okay. 'Possum and coon are soul food classics but I've never tried either. I've had armadillo on several occasions and a variety of wild fowl.
Wild duck breast is one of the most incredibly delicious things I've ever eaten and the best steak I ever ate was venison.
I never heard of eating squirrel brains, but canned pork brains used to be available and the are quite good with scrambled eggs. I'm not sure whether they are still available though and I have it from a good source that the local slaughterhouse is no longer allowed to sell pig heads to brain eaters.


You will be happy to learn that three ounces of pig brains contain 2,169 mg, or 723% of the recommended daily allowance for cholesterol, according to this.


Voy a tomar 3 tacos con sesos por favor....
Anyone have a favorite method for freezing/preserving basil? I attempt to stagger the planting, but still have more than I can use. I'd appreciate a method that you use, i.e. if you grow basil and preserve some by freezing it. Thanks.
Hi Joe,
I always get too much basil too.
I chop it and freeze it in ice cube trays covered with a few drops of water.
I always use water but a friend suggested that olive oil (*grin*) would work well too.
After it's solid store the cubes in freezer bags.

I've already planted new stuff for this year but have a few cubes left in the freezer too.
Works great!
I make Pesto with it, Joe. I just refrigerate it but there's no reason not to freeze the Pesto. What variety do you grow?
Quote:
a friend suggested that olive oil (*grin*) would work well too.
After it's solid store the cubes in freezer bags.

Chopped basil and olive oil is the beginning of pesto...
The method I have used for a long time is to chop the basil, mix with some e. v. olive oil, and put into small freezer bags, just enough so you can press the bag and contents to about 1/2 inch thickness. Pop in freezer and break off what you need from the bag.

I've also frozen fully loaded pesto this way, but then you are limited a bit in what you can do with it. Perhaps with the basil crop I have coming in this year I will do it both ways.
Originally Posted By: olyve
Hi Joe,
I always get too much basil too.
I chop it and freeze it in ice cube trays covered with a few drops of water.
I always use water but a friend suggested that olive oil (*grin*) would work well too.
After it's solid store the cubes in freezer bags.

I've already planted new stuff for this year but have a few cubes left in the freezer too.
Works great!
olyve, thanks. I love basil, but you really can get too much of a good thing. I going to try freezing some of it in ice cube trays, popping it out of the trays when frozen, and storing the cubes in a freezer bag in the freezer. Some other I'll chop, mix with olive oil, and store in freezer bags. And the rest, I'll just freeze the leaves whole and store in freezer bags. I read that the olive oil coating keeps the basil from getting dark, which will happen if you just freeze the leaves. I'll find out.

I also like and grow parsley. Nothing fancy. Just a few containers. I pinch off the leaves as needed. I've had some plants last 2 years and more. Fresh parsley when needed.
Originally Posted By: Greger
I make Pesto with it, Joe. I just refrigerate it but there's no reason not to freeze the Pesto. What variety do you grow?
I grow Genovese basil. I used to grow up to three varieties at the same time, but I keep coming back to sweet basil, although I'm willing to try a variety that you recommend.

I like pesto, too. I've never frozen it before, but I'll give it a try. I recently took about two cups of basil leaves, chopped it, and added it to my fresh tomato (6 lbs. Roma, 1 28 oz. can crushed, and about 8 oz. left over tomato puree)clam sauce. It really smoothed out the sauce, which was delicious even though I use the canned clams.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The method I have used for a long time is to chop the basil, mix with some e. v. olive oil, and put into small freezer bags, just enough so you can press the bag and contents to about 1/2 inch thickness. Pop in freezer and break off what you need from the bag.

I've also frozen fully loaded pesto this way, but then you are limited a bit in what you can do with it. Perhaps with the basil crop I have coming in this year I will do it both ways.
Thanks. You use the one pint size bags? Does that basil break off easily?
I've always grown sweet basil. I have 2 dozen smallish plants right now. I've seen some "Pesto Basil" in the stores. I'm really fond of Thai Basil but haven't got my hands on any seeds yet but I'll probably stick with Sweet Basil since it does everything I want it to do.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The method I have used for a long time is to chop the basil, mix with some e. v. olive oil, and put into small freezer bags, just enough so you can press the bag and contents to about 1/2 inch thickness. Pop in freezer and break off what you need from the bag.

I've also frozen fully loaded pesto this way, but then you are limited a bit in what you can do with it. Perhaps with the basil crop I have coming in this year I will do it both ways.
Thanks. You use the one pint size bags? Does that basil break off easily?


It breaks off very easily if the stuff in the bag is flattened out. In fact, olive oil doesn't really freeze solid, at least not in my freezer.
I like that idea a lot, Ted.
I do my roasted red peppers like that...flatten it and break it off as needed (not in oil though).
I'll probably do basil both ways this year.
Thanks!
Quote:
Olive oil will harden at refrigerator temperatures - around 37-39F. Determining at what point to call the oil "frozen" is a matter of semantics. The slow increase in hardening as the temperature is lowered is in sharp contrast to a pure substance such as water that switches from a liquid to solid phase at an exact temperature. Olive oil is a complex mixture of oils and waxes. The heavier oils and waxes will form needle-like crystals as the temperature is lowered, then the other oils will start to settle out.

At 40F most of the oils would not harden or form any crystals. At 35F most are firm enough that they cannot be poured but are as soft as butter at room temperature. As the temperature is lowered, more components of the oil solidify. At 10F the oil is hard enough that a fork cannot penetrate it.

Source: Olive Oil Source.com

I buy EVOO in gallon containers and keep only a pint in the pantry. The rest is stored in the refrigerator.
The best way to keep olive oil fresh is to get one of those mylar-looking bladders that wine-in-a-box is kept in. Pop off the valve, wash the bladder really well, then put in hot water and some bicarb. Let it sit for an hour, rinse, and fill with olive oil. Squeeze out as much air as possible and put the valve back on. Put the bladder in the box, label it clearly as olive oil and store in refrigerator.

Why? Because the enemy of oil is oxygen. This way, when you open the tap and let out olive oil you are not allowing oxygen into the bag. There's actually a brand of olive oil that ships this way. Red Island or something. I am too lazy to walk into the kitchen to find out, but I have one in the pantry.
How to Peel a Head of Garlic in Less Than 10 Seconds
Amazing Photos Show What the World Really Eats Anyone's diet look like this?
I gave up most processed and fast foods a long time ago. Homemade is cheaper, and tastes better. I do occasionally fall and partake of fast foods, but that's usually when out on a road trip.
Just had this conversation this evening actually and totted up the processed foods we eat.

not by any great design to avoid it, but just out of habit and normal preference, I realised that the missus and i eat practially no processed foods, with a few exceptions e.g. low fat margerine substitute.
Quote:
low fat margerine substitute.

If I should die because I ate good rich butter
then I shall die with no regrets.

Schlacky! You're a barbecuer so I know you've gotten into dry rubs some. I was just making a batch of rub and made a little too much to go into the Rub Jug and had a little revelation. Pecans!. I processed a cup or so of Nuts into a meal, added the excess rub, more brown sugar, paprika garlic and onion powder powder, went heavy on the chili powder(do you have that in Ireland?) and blended it all together. I now have two Rub Jugs, the Regular Jug rub for shoulders, ribs, and butts. But I also have the Nut Rub. I tried both the other night. The nut crusted ribs were very impressive. I haven't written the recipe out yet but when I do I'll call it Georgia Nut Rub for Shoulders Ribs and Butts.

Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
low fat margerine substitute.

If I should die because I ate good rich butter
then I shall die with no regrets.

Schlacky! You're a barbecuer so I know you've gotten into dry rubs some. I was just making a batch of rub and made a little too much to go into the Rub Jug and had a little revelation. Pecans!. I processed a cup or so of Nuts into a meal, added the excess rub, more brown sugar, paprika garlic and onion powder powder, went heavy on the chili powder(do you have that in Ireland?) and blended it all together. I now have two Rub Jugs, the Regular Jug rub for shoulders, ribs, and butts. But I also have the Nut Rub. I tried both the other night. The nut crusted ribs were very impressive. I haven't written the recipe out yet but when I do I'll call it Georgia Nut Rub for Shoulders Ribs and Butts.


Ahem! I would like to market your product for you, if you haven't already engaged a firm...
It doesn't even have to be good. It just needs a label.
Originally Posted By: Greger
It doesn't even have to be good. It just needs a label.

Please, sir! You are spilling the beans!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I gave up most processed and fast foods a long time ago. Homemade is cheaper, and tastes better. I do occasionally fall and partake of fast foods, but that's usually when out on a road trip.
Cheaper is an understatement! Not only does homemade taste better, but it's also healthier. A lot of that processed crap isn't even real food. Have you noticed that when you eat something made with fresh and natural ingredients that you get a lift, energy surge, and actually feel better? That's how you're supposed to feel. You're not supposed to feel sluggish or, in some cases, slightly ill. Your body's response is telling you something. I can't get over how many people are unable to grasp that simple concept, which amounts to no more than common sense.
Joe~I agree with you about feeling better when eating non-processed foods. Being on dialysis, I have to be even more careful, and there a lot of foods that I cannot eat anymore, or only in very small quantities. So it is far easier to prepare most of my meals from scratch.

Greger~The nut rub sounds very good. Have also considered sauteing pecan halves in some butter, and then sprinkling them with your regular rub to serve as a snack? I've done that with some success.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Joe~I agree with you about feeling better when eating non-processed foods. Being on dialysis, I have to be even more careful, and there a lot of foods that I cannot eat anymore, or only in very small quantities. So it is far easier to prepare most of my meals from scratch.
The heavily processed and fortified (supposedly they put back in what they processed out) tends to clog up the works- so to speak. It really doesn't take that much longer to prepare your meals from real fresh food. I saw scrambled eggs and bacon/sausage frozen- just have to pop in the micro-wave. How hard is it to fry, boil, or poach an egg?
Greger, you ever grow garlic or ginger root here in Florida?
It's too warm down here for most varieties of garlic. I've researched it a little bit and there are two varieties that would do okay here. There might be a few more that would work up north where you are. So far I don't know how I'd get my hands on the right kind of garlic to start with.
It's too cold here for ginger, I think. I've never really looked into growing it. I know a place that often has big fresh looking ginger root, maybe I'll try planting some just to see.
One possible source
Thanks, Joe. It was the Creole and Artichoke varieties I was thinking of. Sounds like the Creoles might do best. I'll bookmark this and order some Cuban Creoles sometime in the fall if it's available.
She's right! Buy local produce. It's good for you!
Salad and tilapia fillets last night for Mr. and Mrs. Haas.
Probably some kind of fish tonight too, unless I decide to take her out and let the kids fend for themselves.
They're on some sort of kick about not liking our favorite restaurants - they're grown and know how to cook!
Besides, Mrs. Haas is a very fun date :-)
I'm making beef stir fry with mushrooms and asparagus tips. Rice and iced tea complete the menu. Homemade coconut ice cream(made with Splenda) for dessert.
Made hamburgers tonight.

fresh beef mince, seasoned with oregano, black pepper and onion powder.

Baked roll, sliced pickle, onion, cherry tomato and cucumber and a homemade pea and mint puree.
Schlack~I've never had a puree like that, but it sounds interesting. Do you have a recipe?
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Schlack~I've never had a puree like that, but it sounds interesting. Do you have a recipe?


easy, Simple!

frozen or fresh peas, simmered like normal until tender, in water with a little salt and some bruised & torn fresh mint leaves.

drain, blend to puree, reserve some of the water in case its too thick

you can also add butter or cream for richness, and to ensure you get the consistency you want. - thinner purees are much better for fancy schmancy presentation (get a plastic squeezy bottle and have fun painting with peas!) return to the pot over a low heat to keep warm.

butter and cream are off the menu for me at the moment, but it still works well.

Quantities, proportions and consistency, are a matter of taste and experimentation.

for the burgers, The puree was quite thick!
Thanks, Schlack! ThumbsUp

Fried Trout(caught yesterday) and Barramundi Almondine, homegrown brussels sprouts and potatoes au gratin, I dug the potatoes this morning. I picked a watermelon this morning too but it looks like the raccons are gonna get more watermelons than I am....
The Barramundi is farmed in Vietnam and was touted as "sustainable Sea Bass" But in no way resembles Chilean Sea Bass(Which isn't really a Sea Bass either)
Oooh, watermelon-it's on sale at my farmer's Market...Gonna have to get some!
Have a good friend coming over tonight, a feast has been planned:

1st course:
Costinis with a trio of toppings: Roasted red pepper and Garlic, Italian Salsa Verde, Caramelised onions and melted gruyere cheese

Pasta Course:
Aglio et Olio (simple but fan-[censored]-tastic

Main course:
Pork tenderloin stuffed with caremlised onions and spinach, wrapped in parma ham, roasted taters, apple sauce, pea puree (i cant stop making it) and gravy

Desert:
Probably Tiramasu (TBC)
last night's feast was moved to tonight instead!

Last night it was thickly cut fillet steak served on rosti, topped with garlic and thyme zuchini ribbons, with pan jus accompanied by a bucket of red wine.

The diet starts again Monday
That sounds great Shlack! The Rosti sounds like fun. I just looked at Danny Boome's recipe and will make it for dinner tonight.
Originally Posted By: Greger
That sounds great Shlack! The Rosti sounds like fun. I just looked at Danny Boome's recipe and will make it for dinner tonight.


Delicious too! For really good rostis make sure to extract as much water as possible before forming the patties. Use a potato ricer to squeeze it out rather than paper towels.

Oh and the feast went really well!

added a touch of vinegar to the pea puree to give it a different tone, worked excellently.


I don't have a potato ricer. But I will add the salt as soon as the potatoes are grated to help draw out some of the moisture.
Then I'll roll them up in a couple of tea towels and wring the water out.

Imagine Whirled Peas!

Your Pea Puree reminds me of the white bean puree I serve with braised lamb. It's very similar to mashed potatoes and can be done with canned Cannellini or Great Northern beans. I suppose Navy beans would work too. It's better when made with freshly cooked beans though.
Planning on tomato sauce, pasta, meatballs & sausage. Seeded about 15 lbs Roma tomatoes, about 3 cups fresh basil, garlic, onion, red wine, spices, etc. Also dumped in two cans of peeled plum tomatoes. I let it simmer anywhere from 3-6 hrs +, depending upon how hungry I get.

With some fresh bread (semolina), it's about as good as it gets. Also, a salad. Nothing fancy. Just Romaine, tomatoes, garlic, black olives, and a vinaigrette. Maybe some Parmesan.
Sounds good, Joe. if I get up off my ass right now I've got about 10 pounds of assorted homegrown tomatoes that need to be run through the tomato mill. My basil is starting to go to seed so I need to cut the tops off all of them. Almost 4:00 here now and and I can have spaghetti and meatballs ready by 7:00....

Schlack, the Roti turned out great! I made a few patties and froze them to see if they would hold up to being deep fried later.

Headed to the kitchen...........
I got the watermelon-it was so delicious served ice cold. My mother used to sprinkle salt on hers, and I did like that, but I can't do that anymore. But it still tastes great just plain and cold! I also picked up some peaches and apricots at the farmer's Market. Those were good, too.

I did up a fresh fruit plate for my guests watching the hockey game last night. It was a great dessert/snack that hit the spot. Peach slices, watermelon slices, red and green seedless grapes, apple slices(I sprinkle them with a little lemon juice, so that they won't turn brown), strawberries, blue berries, black berries, raspberries and pineapple chunks. Some sliced cheddar cheese and baked brie, too. Since these fruits are in season here in SoCal, it wasn't that expensive.
Just got back from a hike along the Gila River, below what's known as The Bird Area. We were about 25 miles from the big fire, wind blowing from us to it, so no smoke. Walked about 2-1/2 miles before noticing that a bear was walking the same way recently, so we turned around. Had a snack with our feet in the river, sardines on garlic crackers.


Got back to the truck and pulled the watermelon out and had to go back and sit on some rocks while the terriers hunted and we watched dragon flies and crawdads. I'd like to get me some of them crawdads...
My mother loved crawdads. But they are just medium-sized looking bugs(shrimp being small bugs and lobster being big bugs-crabs are spiders). I remember visiting family in Arkansas and Louisiana where they would boil up some crawdads in a big outdoor kettle, seasoned with some Old Bay seasoning and Louisiana hot sauce.Cooked with potatoes and corn on the cob, it was all dumped out on a newspaper covered table and people(except for me) would just go to town on the feast. I had a peanut butter sandwich.
Funny. I don't think of Crawdads as food, they are the little ones and good only for catfish bait.
Crayfish are the bigger ones, those beloved Mudbugs. They really aren't much good unless they are thrown live into the crab-boil. Frozen crayfish dry out. Most of you probably know this but the proper way to eat one is to tear off the head and suck the juice out of the back of it before pealing the rest like a shrimp. There aint no goody in the heads of frozen crayfish.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
My mother loved crawdads. But they are just medium-sized looking bugs(shrimp being small bugs and lobster being big bugs-crabs are spiders). I remember visiting family in Arkansas and Louisiana where they would boil up some crawdads in a big outdoor kettle, seasoned with some Old Bay seasoning and Louisiana hot sauce.Cooked with potatoes and corn on the cob, it was all dumped out on a newspaper covered table and people(except for me) would just go to town on the feast. I had a peanut butter sandwich.

Sistah, sistah! We talkin' bite size lobsta, heah! They may be bugs, but they be badass bitchin' tasty bugs!

Long time ago I went with some buddies fishing on the Bitterrot River in Montana. We put on the river in a twelve foot aluminum fishing boat with a small outboard engine about 20 miles upstream of Missoula. Being kind of lazy in the hunting/gathering department, I drove the boat, which was a boatload of fun.

Fishing wasn't too productive and just before town we stopped under a railroad bridge to look for crawdads in the rocks. We got a bunch, took them home, and had an excellent feast.

The End
Originally Posted By: Greger
Funny. I don't think of Crawdads as food, they are the little ones and good only for catfish bait.

Uppity Cracker...
I made some smoked chicken tacos last night: Slow-smoked chicken breast meat chunks, feta cheese, late-season home-grown Hass avocado, sliced hot-house cocktail tomatoes, salsa, and thin-sliced romaine lettuce.

Damn, those were good!
Quote:
badass bitchin' tasty bugs


I dunno, Logtroll. I love lobster and shrimp of every variety, but crawdads alwasy taste a litle too much like mud to me. At least that's my impression from all the times I have eaten them down in Lousiana.

Now a shrimp po'boy, on the other hand... Bow
Logtroll~I don't like or eat shellfish. Sorry.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
I made some smoked chicken tacos last night: Slow-smoked chicken breast meat chunks, feta cheese, late-season home-grown Hass avocado, sliced hot-house cocktail tomatoes, salsa, and thin-sliced romaine lettuce.

Damn, those were good!


Those sound yummy!
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
badass bitchin' tasty bugs


I dunno, Logtroll. I love lobster and shrimp of every variety, but crawdads alwasy taste a litle too much like mud to me. At least that's my impression from all the times I have eaten them down in Lousiana.

Now a shrimp po'boy, on the other hand... Bow

Sounds like a water quality issue. The Montana streams run clear as vodka.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Funny. I don't think of Crawdads as food, they are the little ones and good only for catfish bait.
Speaking of bait, I tried sushi when it first became trendy up north many moons ago. A number of friends were raving about it, so I figured that I'd try it. If it weren't for the rice and seaweed, I don't believe that it would have any flavor. I then asked myself, why am I eating expensive bait- raw fish- that may contain parasites no matter how skillfully prepared? Nowadays it probably glows in the dark.
Sushi Info

Anisakid larvae in the body cavity of a herring

Anisakis

Quote:
Anisakis is a genus of parasitic nematodes, which have a life cycle involving fish and marine mammals. They are infective to humans and cause anisakiasis....
Anisakiasis is a human parasitic infection of the gastrointestinal tract caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood containing larvae of the nematode Anisakis simplex....
Fewer than ten cases occur annually in the United States....
Anisakiasis can be easily prevented by adequate cooking at temperatures greater than 60C or freezing. The FDA recommends all shellfish and fish intended for raw consumption be blast frozen to -35C or below for fifteen hours or be regularly frozen to -20C or below for seven days....
Many countries require all types of fish with potential risk intended for raw consumption to be previously frozen to kill parasites....
For the worm, humans are a dead-end host. Anisakis and Pseudoterranova larvae cannot survive in humans, and will eventually die. In some cases, the infection will resolve with only symptomatic treatment. In other cases, however, infection can lead to small bowel obstruction, which may require surgery....

I love sushi, and in almost all respects it is very healthful eating.
In Canada -- and presumably in the USA, if the proper FDA regulations are enforced -- freezing guarantees that parasitic worms and other pathogens are not a problem to worry about in eating sushi. Any carcasses of nematodes that might be present simply add to the protein you are consuming.
I'll pass. I did, however, get into raw Apalachicola oysters. About 1 or 2 people per season would get sick from them, but they usually (not always)had a suppressed immune system. At any rate, I stopped eating them following the BP oil disaster. I even stopped making oyster stuffing.
'
You should get British Columbia oysters, they still seem to be safe -- provided they do not come from an area near a wood pulp processing plant which pumps dioxins and other bad stuff into the ocean so that the paper you use is lily-white rather than brown.
I have to say that there is one exception to my "no shellfish" rule. I'll eat crab, if it is not in the shell and mixed with something else(crab cakes are a favorite), and I'll eat clam chowder(both styles).

Numan~I'll have to tell my sister about BC oysters. She loves them, but after the BP disaster, she quit eating them. She'll be happy for the information. Thanks.
Originally Posted By: numan
'
You should get British Columbia oysters, they still seem to be safe -- provided they do not come from an area near a wood pulp processing plant which pumps dioxins and other bad stuff into the ocean so that the paper you use is lily-white rather than brown.
We're probably the last generation to eat salt water seafood. A trout by the babbling brook is picturesque and delicious, but overall I love that saltwater seafood. Unfortunately, the fisheries are dying, the ocean is being "plasticized," and what's left Fukushima will finish off.
'
It is sad that freshwater fish are more prone to dangerous parasites than sea fish.

Be sure to cook that delicious trout thoroughly.

Trichinella spiralis larvae in muscle tissue

Those who are squeamish about eating sushi should consider that there is greater danger from eating other meats, particularly wild game and pork.

Trichinosis

Quote:
About 11 million individuals are infected with Trichinella; Trichinella spiralis is the species responsible for most of these infections. Infection was once very common, but is now rare in the developed world....The number of cases has decreased because of legislation prohibiting the feeding of raw meat garbage to hogs, increased commercial and home freezing of pork, and the public awareness of the danger of eating raw or undercooked pork products....
Larvae may be killed by the heating or irradiation of raw meat. Freezing is only usually effective for T. spiralis, since other species, such as T. nativa, are freeze resistant and can survive long-term freezing.
* All meat (including pork) can be safely prepared by cooking to an internal temperature of 165 F (74 C) or more for 15 seconds or more.
* Wild game: Wild game meat must be cooked thoroughly....
Freezing wild game does not kill all trichinosis larval worms. This is because the worm species that typically infests wild game can resist freezing.
* Pork: Freezing cuts of pork less than 6 inches thick for 20 days at 5 F (-15 C) or three days at -4 F (-20 C) kills T. spiralis larval worms but will not kill other trichinosis larval worm species such as T. nativa if they have infested your pork food supply (which is unlikely).
emphasis added
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I have to say that there is one exception to my "no shellfish" rule. I'll eat crab, if it is not in the shell and mixed with something else(crab cakes are a favorite), and I'll eat clam chowder(both styles).
Dungeness crab (those large ones in CA?)? I'm familiar with blue crabs. I love crab. I once made a wonderful crab (blue crab backfin) cake. I also purchased soft shell crabs at a farmers' market where I could buy fresh (live) soft shell crabs. Large were about .75 to a buck and jumbo about 1.50. I also made a decent crab soup and omelet.
Originally Posted By: numan
Those who are squeamish about eating sushi should consider that there is greater danger from eating other meats, particularly wild game and pork.
You may be right about wild game, but I believe that you're mistaken about pork. Trichinosis was a problem quite some time ago (hence the Biblical prohibitions), but that was some time ago.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I have to say that there is one exception to my "no shellfish" rule. I'll eat crab, if it is not in the shell and mixed with something else(crab cakes are a favorite), and I'll eat clam chowder(both styles).
Dungeness crab (those large ones in CA?)? I'm familiar with blue crabs. I love crab. I once made a wonderful crab (blue crab backfin) cake. I also purchased soft shell crabs at a farmers' market where I could buy fresh (live) soft shell crabs. Large were about .75 to a buck and jumbo about 1.50. I also made a decent crab soup and omelet.


Dungeness is what is common around here. I cannot stand to look at them in the shell. Unfortunately for me, the Chinese market, where I do some shopping at only carries live fish and shellfish in big tanks. You are able to pick whichever one you want.

I do like wild-caught salmon(especially copper river species) and wild Alaskan halibut. But not with any heavy sauces.
Originally Posted By: numan
'
It is sad that freshwater fish are more prone to dangerous parasites than sea fish.

Be sure to cook that delicious trout thoroughly.


When I traveled to Canada 30 years ago, we fished for trout in the middle of the province up by Prince George. That was great trout, which we seasoned with butter, lemon, some wild garlic and wrapped in foil. We then baked them among the coals. I think that due to the colder water temperatures, Canadian trout tastes better than trout from the lower US 48.
Many moons ago I was in San Francisco, I hit the Fisherman's Wharf with a passion. Loved the place. I intended to try to Californian crab, but never got around to it. The red snapper, etc. got in the way. Stayed in Tiburon (sp?) to save money and took the ferry in morning. Drove up along the coast. Had a great time. Ate a lot of good food and drank the world's best wine! Met a lot of wonderful people. What a great area!
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Many moons ago I was in San Francisco, I hit the Fisherman's Wharf with a passion. Loved the place. I intended to try to Californian crab, but never got around to it. The red snapper, etc. got in the way. Stayed in Tiburon (sp?) to save money and took the ferry in morning. Drove up along the coast. Had a great time. Ate a lot of good food and drank the world's best wine! Met a lot of wonderful people. What a great area!


Fisherman's Wharf is wonderful! And yes, you spelled "Tiburon" correctly. ThumbsUp
Thank you, mam. I had a great time. Met a lot of really good people.
Numan, I promised you my beet soup recipe a while back.
Here it is and Beets are in season!


Beet Soup

1 beet, medium dice
1 onion, small dice
1 potato medium dice
4 cups chicken broth
4 Tbsp butter
Bay leaf
1Tbsp fresh chopped dill weed
1Tbsp fresh basil

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup cream

Saute onion in butter until transparent.
Add chicken broth and bring to a boil
Add beet, potato bay leaf, basil, and dill,
cook until tender. Add sour cream and cream.
Blend with immersion blender until smooth.
Correct seasoning.
That beet soup recipe sounds delicious.
It's not just delicious it's amazing. If you make this soup with canned beets it comes out a beautiful pink. If you do it with a good fresh beet it's almost blood red. I ate the whole pot of soup with fresh bread and Leffe Brown Ale.

Borscht, Bread, and Beer.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: numan
'
It is sad that freshwater fish are more prone to dangerous parasites than sea fish.

Be sure to cook that delicious trout thoroughly.


When I traveled to Canada 30 years ago, we fished for trout in the middle of the province up by Prince George. That was great trout, which we seasoned with butter, lemon, some wild garlic and wrapped in foil. We then baked them among the coals. I think that due to the colder water temperatures, Canadian trout tastes better than trout from the lower US 48.

The best trout I ever had was in the lower 48. A buddy and I went on a 130 mile backpacking trip across the Frank Church River Of No Return Wilderness. Five days in we had been living on gorp, oatmeal, spinach noodles, dried apricots, and tea. We spent a long day descending from the alpine region of the Bighorn Crags down to the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, then up Big Creek for a couple of miles. I almost stepped on a timber rattler that Ron, in his fatigue, had just stepped over in the trail, thinking it was a pile of sticks. I thought it was a pile of sticks, too, except that it was rattling and all coiled up.

We made camp in a large cave, excavated by some crazy-ass miners eighty years earlier. Ron started a fire and I took my fly rod down to Big Creek about 30 feet away. Within five minutes I had caught two fat westslope cutthrout trout and cleaned them. They went right on the little grill we had with us, with a tiny bit of butter. Ten minutes later we were licking our fingers after an utterly transcendent dining experience.
The best coffee I ever had was seven days later on the same hike. We found a partial 3 pound can of Folgers lying in the trail, probably lost by a horse packer. Getting close to the end of our trip we were a bit ahead of schedule for meeting our ride at Mackay Bar on the South Fork of the Salmon. So we made camp at 1:00 in the afternoon and started a pot of cowboy coffee, which is a pan of water heated on the campfire with some coffee grounds thrown in. We drank the finest coffee in the world for the next four hours.
Beet Borscht: An Extremely Effective Liver Cleanser
'
Thank you, Greger, for giving us your borscht recipe.
It is not too different from the way I have been making it, except that I use seared cubes of beef and do not blend it -- so I guess it is more like a stew. I also add only sour cream at the table -- I like the color contrast.

Naturally, living here in New Age Lotus Land, I have many vegetarian friends, so if I substitute vegetable broth (I wonder if miso would work?), I think your recipe would be good to serve to guests.
(Japanese-East European borscht? -- ah, well, we do live in the 21st century!)
I think your chunky recipe might be more Russian or Ukrainian than mine, which I consider to be a Polish Creamed Beet Soup - Barszcz Zabielany But I'm not Polish and I wrote the recipe myself without any input from a Polish Babka.
Technically I think the broth should be the water that Kielbasa was cooked in. But this is a small, fast, pot of soup that is gloriously delicious. In it's simplest form, a can of beets, an onion, and a potato, a couple of chicken or beef bouillon cubes, water and a dollop of sour cream will get supper on the table in a matter of minutes.
It's kind of a pain if you don't have an immersion blender though, I'd hate to do it in a regular blender.

For Vegans you might need to use a soft silken tofu instead of sour cream and a couple of teaspoons of vinegar to correct the acidity.

While I've been thinking about beets I've looked at a variety of recipes online and the one which seems most exciting is a very large pot of Borscht cooked with a rack of spareribs in it.
'
You can boil spareribs? !! tonbricks

Your point about correcting for acidity is a good one.
I will keep it in mind.
Originally Posted By: numan
'
You can boil spareribs? !! tonbricks

Your point about correcting for acidity is a good one.
I will keep it in mind.


Yes, it helps to make sure the pork is thoroughly cooked.
Lasagna. About once or twice a month. Everybody likes it. However, there's a problem. For the no-boil noodles, the instructions say to cut a layer or two off the recipe. Nope. Bake as you will. Just put a cookie sheet under what you're baking and adjust for the cookie sheet (about 3-5 minutes additional timing). It's not your grandfather's lasagna, but it still tastes good.
Sounds good, Joe! Lasagna isn't in my repertoire. I love it but I never make it
I don't cook much Italian at all. Maybe I'll work it into the menu this month, the budget is gonna be tight so I'll need to cook some stuff I can stretch out a ways.

Quote:
You can boil spareribs? !! tonbricks

Not normally. Three hours in the oven at 250 degrees will generally get you perfect ribs, depending on a variety of factors.
But cooking spareribs in Borscht? Think of it as braising.
I often use pork trimmings in Barbecue beans. When you trim regular spareribs into St. Louis style ribs you wind up with a lot of waste, I dice it up and make baked beans.
Spareribs cooked in Borscht would Probably come off the bones and generally be messy to deal with but very very tender if simmered about two hours.
Greger~My mom did the same thing with her baked beans, She would use pork trimmings or bacon when ever she made them, and use real molasses and brown sugar. She would let cook on low all day in the oven.
I think cured bacon is a little too fatty and a little too cured. It works for traditional Boston Baked beans but for Barbecue Beans I like a lot little bits and pieces of slowly simmered and tender pork., lots of onions, and a cup or so of barbecue sauce along with the brown sugar and molasses.
Quote:
She would let cook on low all day in the oven.

Dang. Just let me have a bowl a them beans of that over jasmine rice and I will think myself to be on the very gates of heaven.
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
She would let cook on low all day in the oven.

Dang. Just let me have a bowl a them beans of that over jasmine rice and I will think myself to be on the very gates of heaven.


When you ever come down to SoCal, I'll make you some! grin
Originally Posted By: Greger
I think cured bacon is a little too fatty and a little too cured. It works for traditional Boston Baked beans but for Barbecue Beans I like a lot little bits and pieces of slowly simmered and tender pork., lots of onions, and a cup or so of barbecue sauce along with the brown sugar and molasses.


We liked the smokiness of the bacon. It seemed to compliment the BBQ sauce very well. Whenever we made butter beans, we used onions, fatback or salt pork chopped up fine. Or a smoked ham hock. Those would cook all day, and then we added a dash or two of worcestershire sauce to them. This was traditionally served with a baked ham and stewed greens-at least in our house.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: Greger
I think cured bacon is a little too fatty and a little too cured. It works for traditional Boston Baked beans but for Barbecue Beans I like a lot little bits and pieces of slowly simmered and tender pork., lots of onions, and a cup or so of barbecue sauce along with the brown sugar and molasses.


We liked the smokiness of the bacon. It seemed to compliment the BBQ sauce very well. Whenever we made butter beans, we used onions, fatback or salt pork chopped up fine. Or a smoked ham hock. Those would cook all day, and then we added a dash or two of worcestershire sauce to them. This was traditionally served with a baked ham and stewed greens-at least in our house.


You have to email me that butter bean recipe. I may just be able to kill my husband with it if I can get him to eat the entire container. He LOVES butter beans. You don't mind being and accessory to murder, do you?
It's good to see you Siannan!
I just picked up a pound each of dried Lima, Navy, and Great Northern beans because of this thread.

Suicide by Legumes...
Originally Posted By: Siannan
I may just be able to kill my husband with it if I can get him to eat the entire container. He LOVES butter beans. You don't mind being and accessory to murder, do you?

Why don't you just bean him with a mallet, or something?
Funny, I hadn't caught up on the bean posts lately, but my wife just asked me to soak some pintos so I can cook up a pot of beans tomorrow. I use either minced bacon or ground pork sausage, onion, garlic, brown sugar, ground pasilla chili pepper, plus a little hot sauce and smoke flavor.
Okay, that's it. I'm soakin' some Butterbeans!

Here comes "BUTTERBEAN"



Eric Scott Esch (born August 3, 1966) is an American heavyweight boxer, kick boxer, professional wrestler, and mixed martial artist commonly referred to as Butterbean.
He is the former IBA Super-Heavyweight Champion and also held the WAA Heavyweight title. His combined professional fight record currently stands at 97 wins with 67 knockouts, 20 losses and 5 draws. Butterbean currently resides in Jasper, Alabama where he owns a restaurant, Mr Bean BBQ.

Butterbean
I wouldn't complaint about the beans (or anything else) in his restaurant!
Tonights feast will be a pan roasted thick cut new york strip steak, horseradish mashed taters, caramelised onions and a pan jus.

(28 day aged beef! It pays to build a good relationship with your butcher)

Ill may add some garlic and thyme into the pan when roasting, but i think i may want to let the beef flavour shine instead. Decisions,decisions.

I have 2 kilos of onions for caramelising, they freeze up great. Will be used over the coming weeks for french onion soup, crostini toppings, and as a base for curry.
Sounds great Schlackie! I went out for Prime Rib with the neighbors last night but got those beans for tonight!
Quote:
I have 2 kilos of onions for caramelising,

I have something like 50 kilos of onions right now. Several hundred of them. It's my onion crop for the year. Some of them will keep for most of the year, others, the big sweet ones, wont.
I never thought of caramelizing and freezing, thanks, I'll get right on that!


Here is a great warm weather snack -- or meal !!

Chinese Lettuce Wrap

Quote:
Lettuce wraps are basically minced chicken (or pork) wrapped up in fresh iceberg lettuce leaves served with hoisin dipping sauce. Lettuce wraps are tasty and very refreshing and come complete with a crunchy texture of the cold iceberg lettuce leaf. They are healthy and great for the palate.
People love to play with their food, in this case, the assemblingand eatingof lettuce wraps are fun to many people....
For the dipping sauce, I added some ponzu sauce to the typical hoisin-chili dip to give it an extra layer of flavor. Lettuce wraps also go extremely well with sweet chili sauce, so its totally up to you how you want to devour these tasty lettuce wraps.

Of course, you can use more delicate types of lettuce, but I find iceberg the easiest.

I often use freshly washed lettuce leaves, and just cut-up barbequed pork and a dab of hoisin sauce in the middle of the leaf, wrap it up, and eat -- quick, easy, and delicious!

You can find lots of ways to gussy it up, for example, HERE and HERE.
Originally Posted By: Siannan
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: Greger
I think cured bacon is a little too fatty and a little too cured. It works for traditional Boston Baked beans but for Barbecue Beans I like a lot little bits and pieces of slowly simmered and tender pork., lots of onions, and a cup or so of barbecue sauce along with the brown sugar and molasses.


We liked the smokiness of the bacon. It seemed to compliment the BBQ sauce very well. Whenever we made butter beans, we used onions, fatback or salt pork chopped up fine. Or a smoked ham hock. Those would cook all day, and then we added a dash or two of worcestershire sauce to them. This was traditionally served with a baked ham and stewed greens-at least in our house.


You have to email me that butter bean recipe. I may just be able to kill my husband with it if I can get him to eat the entire container. He LOVES butter beans. You don't mind being and accessory to murder, do you?


Siannan, here it is:

1 bag dried butter beans, washed and soaked overnight
2 white or yellow onions chopped fine
1 clove garlic crushed and diced
2-3 stalks celery-diced
1 carrot diced
2-3 tablespoons olive oil or butter
1-2 smoked ham hocks
1/2 teaspoon ground sage
1 teaspoon parsley
1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
salt to taste
Pepper to taste

In large dutch oven, saute onions, garlic, celery and carrots in oil or butter until onions are transparent. Add drained beans, ham hocks and seasonings add water to cover cook on low until beans are tender, about 3-4 hours, but taste-test. I like to serve this with greens(Kale, mustard, collard or Spinach) and corn bread. The best way to make cornbread is to mix your batter, and pour into a greased cast iron skillet, and bake in the oven. when you stew the greens, use a a piece of bacon to season. If you like it spicy, serve with Tabasco sauce on the side, or season with a bit of cayenne pepper.
Originally Posted By: numan


Here is a great warm weather snack -- or meal !!

Chinese Lettuce Wrap

Quote:
Lettuce wraps are basically minced chicken (or pork) wrapped up in fresh iceberg lettuce leaves served with hoisin dipping sauce. Lettuce wraps are tasty and very refreshing and come complete with a crunchy texture of the cold iceberg lettuce leaf. They are healthy and great for the palate.
People love to play with their food, in this case, the assemblingand eatingof lettuce wraps are fun to many people....
For the dipping sauce, I added some ponzu sauce to the typical hoisin-chili dip to give it an extra layer of flavor. Lettuce wraps also go extremely well with sweet chili sauce, so its totally up to you how you want to devour these tasty lettuce wraps.

Of course, you can use more delicate types of lettuce, but I find iceberg the easiest.

I often use freshly washed lettuce leaves, and just cut-up barbequed pork and a dab of hoisin sauce in the middle of the leaf, wrap it up, and eat -- quick, easy, and delicious!

You can find lots of ways to gussy it up, for example, HERE and HERE.


One of my favorite things to eat. Easy to make, too!
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
She would let cook on low all day in the oven.

Dang. Just let me have a bowl a them beans of that over jasmine rice and I will think myself to be on the very gates of heaven.


The secret of delicious baked beans is to keep them covered with water at all times except during the last hour of baking.

2-quart bean pot
2 teaspoons dry mustard
2 pounds white pea beans(I prefer navy beans)
4 teaspoons salt
1 pound fat salt pork
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
8 ounces of BBQ sauce
1 medium size onion
2/3 cup molasses
1 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons brown sugar

Soak beans overnight in water.

In the morning, rinse the beans and cover with fresh water that you have added 1 teaspoon of baking soda and parboil them for 10 minutes.

Run cold water through the beans in a colander or strainer. Score salt pork into 1- inch squares, then cut in. Put 1/2 of the salt pork on the bottom of the bean pot with whole peeled onion. Put beans in the pot and put the rest of the salt pork on top.

Mix other ingredients with boiling water and pour over beans. Bake in preheated 250 degree F oven for 8 hours. Keep adding water as necessary to keep the beans moist, but be sure not to flood the beans. Do not cover.

Serves 8 to 10.

I have never served these over rice, but I guess you could...grin
Originally Posted By: numan

Of course, you can use more delicate types of lettuce, but I find iceberg the easiest.



Little Gem is perfect, ready made lettuce cups
Your baked bean recipe is about the same as mine, sans the BBQ sauce. I'll add the BBQ sauce next time that I make beans. You might consider serving a side of crispy and cold coleslaw with the baked beans. The hot cold contrast work well together.
All this talk about beans got me hungry, so I made a pot of bean soup last night and just had some for breakfast. I had picked up a package of Hurst's HamBeens 15 Bean Soup mix, but you can substitute a pound of Great Northern, Navy, or whatever you prefer. I more or less follow the package's directions, which are simple and don't require anything exotic or that you won't use again.

Recipe (more or less): After soaking beans overnight, drain water, and rinse. Add two quarts of water and 1 lb ham hocks, add the 2 quarts of water and meat to beans, bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer (light boil) uncovered for 2 and 1/2 hours. If necessary, add some water. Then add one diced onion, one can 14.5 oz. diced tomatoes or tomato equivalent (you can use more, such as a 28 oz. can), 1 tsp. chili powder, juice from one lemon and garlic to taste (one to two cloves- I use about a bulb). Simmer another 30 minutes and add contents of ham packet 1-2 minutes before cooking is completed if you have a ham packet to add (you really don't need it). Salt and pepper to taste. I like the variety of the 15 Bean Soup mix. IMO- tastes pretty good.
Last night two po' folk ate po'k ribs, 'tater salad and coleslaw. No dessert - well, if you consider Greek yogurt 4% - dessert.
Cows produce milk? 40% of British young adults unaware

Quote:
Less than half of this younger generation of consumers knew that butter comes from dairy cows, according to the DailyMail. Among the adults, 58 percent knew where butter comes from, but still 2 percent thought it was produced by pigs or chickens.
Just 40 percent of the young adults were able to match milk with a cow. Even more shocking, 7 percent of them associated it with wheat.
Young adults were just as confused about other food products as well:
33 percent didnt know eggs are produced by chickens; 11 percent thought eggs are made of wheat or corn
36 percent were unaware that bacon comes from pigs
One in 10 thought new potatoes took less than a month to grow
One in five said that jam is produced by cereal crops
Young adults think beef cows do more than just produce beef - 8 percent though beef cows produce milk for humans, and 1 percent thought they produce eggs

Source
I made Butterbeans yesterday, added a cup of diced fresh Pork Belly, two big onions diced and two seeded diced jalapenos.
I served em up with homemade whole wheat bread.

How'd you cook them ribs, Rick? Let me know if you need the recipe for a great Nut Rub.
Too bad we neanderthal Americans are incapable of emulating the high culture of the British Empire - right, noomie?

I wonder where the Queen's eggs and milk come from?
'

Probably from the happiest country on Earth -- Denmark.
The lettuce wraps sound real good and I'll try them. What this peasant likes is a lot of very cold iceberg lettuce on a large plate with a very hot hamburger pattie on the lettuce bed with a cold fresh diced tomato spread over it, topped with some mayo. Not gourmet, but I like it.
Many Thai salads are served with large lettuce leaves for wrapping. My favorite is a fiery Green Papaya salad(som tum)
Green papayas are pretty hard to find though.

Back to beans laugh

Scout, I always cover my baked beans. Whether I'm doing simple Boston Baked Beans or a meaty, more complex, Barbecue bean recipe. The old ceramic bean pots were made so that very little moisture was lost during cooking.
I do most other beans on the stovetop in a Dutch Oven, covered and simmered very slowly until the beans are tender then I remove the lid and simmer a little longer to reduce the liquid a little bit.
'

If the beef is hormone-free and antibiotic-free, you may manage to rise above peasant status.
Originally Posted By: Greger
How'd you cook them ribs, Rick? Let me know if you need the recipe for a great Nut Rub.

I "cooked" the ribs by going to Sticky Chicken and Ribs. Nut rub? Is that legal in Cali? Pro'lly as long as money doesn't exchange hands. smile
I'm pretty sure it's legal everywhere, and there's really nothing like a sweet Nut Rub on your ribs and shoulders.
It's great for a picnics and butts too!
Nut rub on the butt.

glad I got that out of the way

Tonight:

A thick pork chop, riced tater, garlic wilted spinach and roasted red sweet peppers*.

* simple as hell. slice red pepper, place skin side up under broiler, broil until skin blackens, put pepper pieces into a pastic ziplock bag, seal and cover with a tea towel.

After 20 mins the skin will peel easily off, a drizzle of olive oil and they're ready.
'
Sliced red or orange peppers, blue cheese and rice crackers make a nice snack.

By the way, Schlack, thanks for the heads-up on Little Gem lettuce.
In the Wonderland of New-Age foods where I live, I am sure it is available -- I just haven't noticed it.
My mom had a beautiful bean pot that she used to make the BBQ baked beans. She used a dutch oven for most of the other bean recipes that we ate. We always had black-eyed peas for New Years, growing up. She would make them, using the same recipe we use for butter beans, except we used slat pork and pork bits, instead of ham hocks. No smoky flavor. I like the 15 bean combo. Our grocery stores sell that in a bag for soup. It comes with a seasoning packet, but my family doesn't like it as much as our usual family recipe.

I've seen Little Gem lettuce at the organic market. I'll try some with the diced chicken filling. Thanks for the tip, schlack!

Tonight, for Father's Day, we are having Mr. Scoutgal's favorite meal. Pot Roast slow cooked all day in the crock pot. I seared the roast, and sprayed the crock pot with vegetable spray. Dropped in the roast, covered with pearl onions, carrots, celery stalks and red rose potatoes. Seasoned with kosher salt, paprika, two bay leaves, parsley, two cloves of garlic and pepper. For liquid, I add one cup dry red wine(I like a good burgundy), 4 cups beef stock or beef broth, and if needed, water to cover. Cook on low for at least 6 hours. I serve it with King's Hawaiian rolls and butter. Oh, I also make a gravy from the liquid with Wondra and a whisk. No lumps!
Originally Posted By: numan
'
Sliced red or orange peppers, blue cheese and rice crackers make a nice snack.


Now that would be a great summer lunch! ThumbsUp
Quote:
I serve it with King's Hawaiian rolls and butter.

More trivia! In Hawaii Hawaiian rolls" (or bread) has always been known as Portuguese sweet bread. Or Pao doce. It was originally brought to Hawaii by the Portuguese immigrants over 100 years ago and is very popular there, just like the Portuguese sausage. Or linguica.

But when it become popular on the mainland the name was changed to Hawaiian bread-- which has given me a little chuckle.
'
I always do pot roast in the oven -- I must try your crock-pot recipe, thanks!

I have never used burgundy for pot roast, but I like the idea. There is a cheap California "burgundy" which I use for cooking -- I won't advertise its name, but it has a supposed religious connection -- it is hideous as a beverage, but good for cooking.

For gravy, I heat butter in a deep, heavy skillet, add flour while stirring, let it get slightly brown, add the pot roast juices slowly, while stirring, and reduce the liquid on low heat.
Old fashioned, I know, but its easy, and it works!
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
I serve it with King's Hawaiian rolls and butter.

More trivia! In Hawaii Hawaiian rolls" (or bread) has always been known as Portuguese sweet bread. Or Pao doce. It was originally brought to Hawaii by the Portuguese immigrants over 100 years ago and is very popular there, just like the Portuguese sausage. Or linguica.

But when it become popular on the mainland the name was changed to Hawaiian bread-- which has given me a little chuckle.


I did not know that! I love learning stuff like that.
Originally Posted By: numan
'
I always do pot roast in the oven -- I must try your crock-pot recipe, thanks!

I have never used burgundy for pot roast, but I like the idea. There is a cheap California "burgundy" which I use for cooking -- I won't advertise its name, but it has a supposed religious connection -- it is hideous as a beverage, but good for cooking.

For gravy, I heat butter in a deep, heavy skillet, add flour while stirring, let it get slightly brown, add the pot roast juices slowly, while stirring, and reduce the liquid on low heat.
Old fashioned, I know, but its easy, and it works!


numan~Your reipe is the only way I've made gravy. I just use Wondra instead of flour. Roux-based gravies are the best! ThumbsUp
Pot roast without the Burgundy is Pot Roast.
Pot roast with the Burgundy is Beef Bourguignon.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Pot roast without the Burgundy is Pot Roast.
Pot roast with the Burgundy is Beef Bourguignon.


Then that is what I've always made. grin
I guess Iceberg is good for cups, since it holds its shape pretty well. I prefer red or green leaf lettuce for wraps, because they are more flexible. You can wrap a leaf tightly, fold it, tuck it under itself, etc. without breakage. All the Vietnamese restaurants around here use the green leaf lettuce.

The red is prettier, but seems to go bad a LOT faster in the crisper.
Quote:
1 bag dried butter beans, washed and soaked overnight


Hey, Scoutgal: Is that a one pound bag, two pound bag, or what? I usually buy dry beans by the 10 pound bag at a restaurant supply place, but I've seen all sorts of different-sized bags at the supermarket. And of course, bins and barrels at the local "healthy food" chains.

I want to expand my bean standard dishes, so I'm going to try both of your recipes.
Grocery store bags are usually 1 pound bags. It's in the neighborhood of two cups of dry beans.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
1 bag dried butter beans, washed and soaked overnight


Hey, Scoutgal: Is that a one pound bag, two pound bag, or what? I usually buy dry beans by the 10 pound bag at a restaurant supply place, but I've seen all sorts of different-sized bags at the supermarket. And of course, bins and barrels at the local "healthy food" chains.

I want to expand my bean standard dishes, so I'm going to try both of your recipes.


Oops! A two pound bag. Sorry! blush
Originally Posted By: Greger
Grocery store bags are usually 1 pound bags. It's in the neighborhood of two cups of dry beans.


I get mine at the health food store. They come in both one and two pound bags.
I don't know what I'd do with more than a pound of beans, I figured those 2 pound bags were for big families. I only cook a pound at a time even if I'm having company and could easily get by cooking a single cup of beans for myself. I ate beans for supper and froze a quart of Butterbeans and have a pint in the fridge from just a single pound of dried baby limas.

I'm making cream of chicken soup for supper. I stewed a couple of leg quarters, pulled them out to cool down so I could debone them, added a few fresh herbs to the stock and came in here for a few minutes.
I just went back to bone the chicken and the damn dog ate every bit of it. It really wont change the soup much but it wont have chunks of meat in it now unless I drag out a frozen chicken breast and toss it in. Maybe I'll do that...
Damn dog.

I have two dry cups of pintos soaking since last night. I'll cook them tonight, put them in the fridge, and we'll have beans for the week. (They improve a bit overnight.)

I may cut the butter bean recipe in half, since it's just for the two of us. We are usually tired of beans by the time we get through one pound.
When I make the butter bean recipe, it was for 5 adults, and there were usually enough leftover beans for one more meal. I had two teenaged boys most of the time, and they ate like there was no tomorrow. If the beans weren't the main dish, but a side, I would only make half. I served them with a baked ham, greens and cornbread.When my mom made this, we had a family of six.
The pot roast turned out very well. Enough leftovers for one more meal, and extra potatoes for frying up for breakfast. Mr. Scoutgal had two helpings of everything, and still left room for dessert-coconut cream pie! This is Mr. Scoutgal's favorite meal, and very apropo for Father's Day. grin
Originally Posted By: Greger
Pot roast without the Burgundy is Pot Roast.
Pot roast with the Burgundy is Beef Bourguignon.
Beef Bourguignon with red wine sauce, egg noodles, and green beans is one of my favorite dishes. I tie and then marinate a bottom round in 500-750 ml (or more)of a dry red- usually Cabernet- along with a can of beef broth and a couple cloves of garlic overnight in the refrigerator (can leave it in longer), then sear the meat in a large pan on the stove, and then bake it.
Just a minor technicality here, Joe, but pot roast is braised, not baked or roasted.
Braising(cooking in liquid) can be done in a crock pot or Dutch oven on the stove top but the oven offers a more even heat.
Roasting and baking imply the use of dry heat.

I just don't like Pot Roast or Boef Bourguignon. It's okay, I'll eat it, but I wont generally cook it. I prefer to take all the same ingredients and make a fine Beef Stew.

Anybody ever eat braised Lamb Foreshanks?
Originally Posted By: Greger


Anybody ever eat braised Lamb Foreshanks?


I would eat it almost every day, cept Mrs Schlack doesnt like to eat the prettier animals.

Lamb is a rarity in my household, if you'll pardon the pun.
Hrrmph...aint nuthi'n pretty about a sheep. Lamb Pie, Lamb Stew, Lamb Chops, Roast Leg, Braised Shanks...now those are pretty! As livestock goes Lamb is treated fairly well. It's purely a shame what we do to chickens and pigs. Beef cattle at least get to spend some time in a pasture. Sheep may get the best treatment of the lot.
I do know the sheep in our neck lead what looks to me to be a mighty fine life. That is--assuming their dont comprehend their fate as calories.
They loll around in huge fields of thick, damp, green grass munching away to their hearts content. Its great succulent lamb too! Shoo whee.

Bring on them shanks and whatever other cuts you might have. To me lamb is the best. BTW Ive never cooked lamb shanks before but found what looks like some mighty fine recipes on the all knowing net. I can visualize whirled peas and lamb shanks in my immediate future.
If you can find it, Tom Valenti's recipe is dA bOmB!
The braising liquid is extremely complex, but oh so worth it.
I got his recipe from the newspaper(Parade Magazine) back in 2002, still have the original clipping in my cookbook.

Hrrrm...that wont be hard to find. I just googled it. I guess I'm not the only one who feels that way about his recipe.
Here it is
It says in this link it was March 2002 but the clipping is dated February 24, 2002. This is the picture in the clipping:

This lamb comes out tender enough to eat with a spoon.


Dear me, Greger! I am sure that it tastes good, but its presentation is rather distressingly too much out of the Stone Age! That enormous bone that must be gnawed at!!

Surely everyone brought up in a well-appointed old-style Japanese house is struck by the sickroom, indeed, the operating room quality, of our table-settings----the shrouded table, the aseptic look of the dinnerware, the variety of surgical instruments for disecting and paring, for cutting a sinew or laying bare a bone. Floral offerings and lighted candles, far from enhancing the food, shift the mood from the convalescent stage to the lying-in-state. Our custom of lighting candles for our live dinner guests is disturbing to a Japanese.
---Rudofsky, The Kimono Mind
No need to gnaw at that bone. If you give it a gentle shake the meat falls off onto your plate.

The Japanese may be offended by our dining habits but they certainly eat a few things we'd consider far more unpalatable and bizzarre.

Here's a few more tantalyzing tidbits from the oh so fussy and offended by our cuisine Japanese.

They eat Ice Cream made from horse meat for god's sake!
And they don't like the flowers on out tables?

I like fresh, but.... Many many moons ago I watched a TV segment on Japanese cuisine. It showed a party of about five picking at and eating a live lobster with their chopsticks as it crawled across the table. I draw the line at oysters.
'
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan

I like fresh, but.... Many many moons ago I watched a TV segment on Japanese cuisine. It showed a party of about five picking at and eating a live lobster with their chopsticks as it crawled across the table.

That is definitely not normal Japanese cuisine!!
Most Japanese would be as horrified as you are!!

It is like suggesting that American college students are addicted to swallowing live goldfish !!
'
Hey, I like fermented soy beans !

Fermented fish sauce has been a part of Western cuisine since the days of the Romans -- who also adored dormice in honey!!
The insecty things are no different than eating crawdads, shrimp, prawns, crab and lobster -- not to mention scallops and oysters !!
And in a proper Japanese restaurant they would be presented artfully and attractively, not in a higgledy-piggledy pile as in your photo !!

I can see you are spoiling for a fight, Greger, so I will match your ten and raise you five ! grin

15 American Foods That Are as Weird to Foreigners as Poisonous Blowfish Is to Us

Quote:
"Boiled animal bones and hide, colored with garish chemicals.... "Oh, you like your Jell-O, don't you?"

"I do think biscuits and gravy are gross and strange." -- Hala, Canada via Lebanon

"Bacon and eggs in the morning seemed weird to me. And then I realized that I could wake up really, really early to find myself a nice baguette or croissants for my breakfast!!!!!!" -- Genevieve, France

Then, one might mention :

* Consuming the lactic secretions of ruminants
* Grits -- or maize in all its forms
* Processed cheese [ugh!]
* Squishy "bread"
* The ersatz "food" called "marshmallows"
* Glop that pretends to be something like mayonaise

* And, of course, American hot dogs!!
I don't eat shellfish precisely because it does look like bugs. Therefore, I will not be eating any bugs(on purpose), either. You eat with the eyes first, and my eyes cannot stomach what these crustaceans and bugs look like. sick

lamb, however, is a different kettle of fish! I love lamb chops. roast lamb with mint sauce, lamb stew and lamb pie! ThumbsUp
All this talk about cute animals reminds of a story:

A traveling salesman was talking with a farmer about the new tractor accessories his company had, when he noticed one of the pigs in the farmer's pen had a wooden leg.

"So what's the story with that pig there?", he asked.

The farmer replied: "That's some kind of pig there, that Bessie. Why we had a fire a couple of months ago, and that smart pig broke out of the pen, busted down the front door, and saved us all!"

The salesman asked: "Did she lose her leg in the fire, then?"

The farmer answered: "No, she was fine. But you know, a pig like that you don't eat all at once!"
Japanese?

Made Miso Ramen on Monday.

Broth: Homemade chicken stock, brown rice miso, sriracha, rice wine vinegar, garlic, ginger, scallions.

Buckwheat soba noodles, boiled egg, ribbons of carrot and zucchini, a few small pieces of leftover chicken, Nori sprinkle to finish.

The most time consuming bowl of instant noodles ever. Totally worth it.


Tonight's delight was:

Aglio et Olio and a little gem side salad with a balsamic vinegarette.


So simple, yet so wonderful.

Tomorrow is mexican night. Chicken fajitas on fresh cooked tortillas, with peppers and onions, home made salsa & Guac with a garlic yoghurt!

3 continents in 3 days!

I'm enjoying a bit of time off at the moment, and so able to put a bit more effort than usual into it.
Fried Chicken, French Fries, Butterbeans and a nice healthy salad with homemade Ranch Dressing for me tonight.

Friday I'm doing Cheese Fondue for 200 people. One recipe is a traditional Swiss version with white wine, Gruyere and Ementaler. The other will be aged sharp cheddar with Guinness Stout and a tiny bit of concentrated apple juice.
It's a wine tasting affair and I'll be matching an Italian Pinot Grigio to the fondue.
Quote:
a pig like that you don't eat all at once!
LOL LOL LOL
Isn't the King Hawaiian bakery off of the 405 around Normandy AV?
Tonight the po' folk at my house dined-on sauted wild-caught halibut w/ avocado and heirloom pear tomato salsa over baby field greens with fresh organic heirloom pear tomato vinaigrette with one 2oz crispy polenta cake.

Bob said he would like this dish in regular rotation on the dinner menu. smile



I bought some lovely cold meats this morning:

smoked ham, pepper salami, mortadella

So am putting together a mezze platter

just finished preparing:

Char grilled baby zucchini
Roast sweet red peppers
home made Hummus
home made Baba Ganoush

and fresh bread just gone into the oven.
A big score yesterday. Local supermarket had a special on rib eye at $6.99 a pound. Special ended on Saturday but I headed over Sunday AM and checked the meat section and there were some left with some nice discounts. Bought four at about $4.99 a pound after discount. Seasoned them and on the grill they went.

Rib Eye: As far as I'm concerned you could throw the rest of the cow away.

Schlacky...You have sure been eating high on the hog lately.
A tip of the toque to your very worthy culinary endeavors of late!

I just finished fermenting a crock of Kimchi and am going to make pickled plum rice balls to go with it(Ume no onigiri).
A sort of Korean/Japanese fusion.
Originally Posted By: Greger

Rib Eye: As far as I'm concerned you could throw the rest of the cow away.


oh dear, oh dear.


even the short rib?
Originally Posted By: Greger



Schlacky...You have sure been eating high on the hog lately.
A tip of the toque to your very worthy culinary endeavors of late!


yeah, I'm kinda running out of ideas for new meals at this stage, however i have added 5/6 new things to my repitoire and wont be too upset to have to eat them repeatedly.

never had kimchi before - is it worth it? Not too sure Mrs Schlack would eat something that had to ferment.

I'm a Dumbass - Saurkraut!
'
I like kimchee in Korean-style soups.

A quick and dirty (and tasty!) way to spice up noodle soups with some vegetable matter !!
well the great bread experiment didnt go too well.

first of all, kitchen scales bugged out so had to try using bathroom scales - not exactly precise. still I managed.

got a decent dough together and started up the food mixer. The mixer is a bit of an antiquue having belonged to my father, built in the 80s and hadnt been used in over a decade. tested it, and spent an evening cleaning the damn thing.

Dough in mixer - grand for 2 mins, then pop and smoke burst forth from the damn machine. Cue grab, dash and dump of heap of crap machine into back garden.

so endeth the first attempt. Couldnt use the dough as the smoke had ruined it.

second attempt was the good old fashioned hand kneading, bit of a pain but quite theraputic. went fine - eventually after a very sticky start.

first time baking bread, set oven a little too hot and nearly destroyed the loaf. Was just about usable - thinly sliced and toasted.

lessons learned:

buy a new damn scales
less sugar
A longer prove
Oven not so hot.

Any tips from the breadthern?



Originally Posted By: Schlack
well the great bread experiment didnt go too well.

first of all, kitchen scales bugged out so had to try using bathroom scales - not exactly precise. still I managed.


Bathroom scale?!?

Baking is a science - literally. You have to measure exactly!

Originally Posted By: Schlack
Any tips from the breadthern?

Buy a bread machine - does all of the work for you! Perfect bread too!


Bread was going to be made today, one way or another!

I cant buy a breadmaker on the principle that it is a single purpose gadget. Once I figure out this oven Ill be grand!
This is the recipe that I always started my kids out on. A great bread and simple. For years my wife and I had a 4H cooking club and the highlight was about 20 years ago as part of a town celebration there was a pie baking contest. Three of our group finished ahead of my wife including our son who finished second with a Strawberry-Rhubarb pie.


Sally Lund Bread



List of Ingredients



1 pkg active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 -115F)
1 3/4 scalded Milk
2 tbsp sugar
1/4 cup butter
1 tsp salt
2 well beaten eggs
5 cups sifted flour (Divided)



Instructions

Dissolve the yeast into warm water.

Combine milk, sugar, butter, and salt in a mixing bowl. Allow to cool. Stir in yeast, eggs, and 3 cups of flour. Add enough additional flour to make a nice soft dough. Place in a greased bowl and turn once to coat all surfaces. Cover and allow to rise in a warm, dark spot.

Punch down and turn onto a lightly floured board. Knead until smooth and elastic. Divide dough in half and form into 2 loaves. Turn into 2 greased 9x5x3 inch loaf pans. Cover and let rise for 1 hour.

Bake at 400 for 15 minutes. Then reduce the temperature to 350 and bake 17 minutes more. Remove from the pans and allow to cool on a wire rack.
Well Scklackie, I can make bread with just my two hands and a big bowl. But it's messy and time consuming.
Or
I can use my Kitchenaide Mixer for the first mixing steps. When the bread dough crawls up the dough hook it's ready to come out and be kneaded for ten minutes or so, allowed to rise, punched down, kneaded again, formed into a loaf and plopped into the bread pan to rise the second time.

By far the easiest, method is to use a bread machine for the mixing, kneading, first rise, punching down, and second kneading. With my machine that takes exactly one hour.

Then I spray a little oil on the dough, remove it from the bread machine pan and put it into a loaf pan. Spray the top with oil again and press it down into the loaf pan, cover it with plastic wrap, let it rise a half hour and bake it at 350F for 30 minutes.

There is a book Available called
Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day
Many find that this method suits their lifestyles best.
It's too fussy for me though.

Here's my recipe, you don't need scales:

Basic White Bread

1 cup warm water(not hot, temp over 140F will kill the yeast)
3 Tbsp Sugar(or less)
3 Tbsp Olive oil
2 1/4 Tsp (1 scant Tbsp) or 1 envelope of active dry or instant yeast

Mix the above ingredients together in a small bowl, set aside. This is called proofing the yeast it will become bubbly and gross looking an about 5 minutes.


Then sift together
3 cups BREAD FLOUR
1 1/2 teaspoons of salt

Measure before you sift, use a dry measuring cup fill the cup heaping full and srape the excess off with the back of a knife.
Sift the flour into a very large bowl, you need room to work so the bigger the better.
Make a well in the sifted dry ingredients.
Pour about half the liquid into the well and stir is small circles with a blending fork. spreading the flour outward and incorporating the liquid into the flour, add the rest of the liquid before all of the first in used up.

Now, get in there with your hands and start mashing it together until it forms into a ball. Depending on the weather you may need to add a tablespoon or so of water or a tablespoon or so of flour. Transfer the ball of dough to a clean,floured work surface. Press it down and away from yourself, fold it over, press it down and away from yourself, dredge it with flour if it's sticky, form it back up and press it down and away, form, press, form, press over and over, you may have guessed that this is kneading the dough.
After a few minutes it will become silky smooth and a little bit shiny.

If the big bowl is a mess, wash it and dry it.
At this point there are two schools of thought.
If the bowl came out pretty clean just dredge it with flour, put the ball of dough back in it. dredge the dough with flour, and cover the bowl with a damp towel.

OR
Spray the bowl with oil, plop the dough into it and spray the dough with oil. Cover with a damp towel and ...

Put it in a warm draft-free place to rise for about an hour.
This is called Proofing the Dough
Clean up your messy kitchen. Use a Bench Knife to scrape up the excess flour and bits and bobs of dough that are stuck on your counter top. Don't clean the work area too well though because you have to knead it a little bit more later.

Pre-heat oven to 350F

When you see that the dough is pushing up on the towel and has pretty much Doubled in Size uncover it, punch it down with your fist(you don't have to hit it hard) this is maybe the funnest part of bread making. pffffffffft.

Flour your work surface again and turn the bread dough out onto it, dredge it with flour and begin kneading again, down and away, form it up, down and away, form it up, knead, reform, knead, reform. Until it is smooth and shiny again.
Place it in a well oiled loaf pan, spray the top with oil and mash it down with your knuckles til it's fairly even. If you have two sizes of loaf pans use the bigger one, the little ones are for quick breads like Banana Bread. Cover the loaf with plastic wrap, spray the top of the plastic wrap generously with oil and turn it over so the oily plastic sits loosely on top of the pan. Put it on top of the stove to rise for a half hour to 45 minutes until it rises a little bit higher than the pan. Remove the plastic and pop it into the preheated oven for 30 minutes.
Ovens vary but you want the bread nicely browned on top so 5 or 10 more minute might be needed.

When it looks like it's done remove it from the oven and turn it out of the pan IMMEDIATELY onto a cooling rack.. Or it will steam itself to mush. The bottom and sides of the loaf should be golden, a little bit toasty and should ring hollow when you thump it.
Let it cool almost completely before cutting it

You might also try Irish Soda Bread





Looks like a pretty good recipe Keyser. I'll give it a shot.
I never need two loaves of bread at a time though because I'm single and just don't use it that fast.
I occasionally add a single egg, or a tablespoon of powdered milk, Usually when I make dinner rolls.
I often add a half cup of chopped nuts, sunflower seeds and whatnot. For those who want whole wheat, substitute one cup of whole wheat flour for one of the cups of bread flour.

Just as a point of interest, did you know you don't have to scald milk anymore? That's a holdover from the days of un-pasteurized milk. But all the ingredients should be at room temperature. Cold milk right outa the fridge might gum up the dough a bit.
Greger...my wife - The Lovely Cynthia - enjoys Soda Bread and occasionally will make a batch herself. I really don't enjoy it but when St Patrick's Day rolls around the local markets wheel it out and every other day I'll have to buy a loaf.

You are correct on the scalding and it is my bad for just copying over an online recipe. The one I have has room temp.

I love bread. Big weakness. For breakfast I actually had left over garlic bread from Little Caesar's. We now have two local supermarkets and both have extensive bakeries so there is a wide variety of great stuff. Portuguese Sweet Bread. Fantastic!

I use to bake extensively. For years I was the day care provider for our kids and then scooted off to work an off shift. Kids would help me bake bread and get desserts ready. Oh did they love that cheesecake!

One son actually worked two summers as a cook on the Alaskan Railroad. Just walked in and said he could "Do the job" and he did. Created a menu based on what we had prepared at home.

Greger....love your inside information that you occasionally post with recipe/meals.
I still think that if you want to bake bread on a regular basis, rather than buying it, a bread machine makes it easy enough that you don't get tired of doing it. Making it by hand is fun but isn't something I'm willing to go through every time I need a loaf of bread. I use only the "dough" setting, I never ever let the machine do the baking, and I pull the dough out before it rises the second time in the machine.
I just read back and had missed a few things...
Short Ribs *sigh* My favorite restaurant has them occasionally. I think he braises them in an Alto-Sham oven. It a super slow low heat oven. I haven't perfected a recipe for Short Ribs.
Anybody got one?

Kimchi has been called Korean Cole Slaw, but sauerkraut is really a better description. Usually it's fiery hot and garlicky, it sticks with you for days after you eat it.
I used a chili garlic paste for seasoning but added no additional garlic. Even so it's very strongly flavored. Not for the meek or fussy eater.
http://www.floramosrestaurant.com/

That is a link to a place I have not been to for years but they had great braised ribs. In fact they had great food period.

I asked about the braised ribs and that is how I heard about the Alto Shaam oven which they used. Never heard of one.

I've always used a crock pot for the ribs and what I do is when they are done sear them in a cast iron skillet. In the crock pot it is just a mixture of wine, tomato paste, some spices or a few other things tossed in. I've also substituted salsa for tomato paste. Nothing fancy. As long as the meat gets tender.
Most likely the restaurant is using an Alto-Shaam Combioven: It steams and dry heats all-in-one!

Every large quantity feeding places using combiovens these days. I'll bet that is why the ribs are so tender.
Keyser~I love Sally Lund bread. It was the first bread I ever learned how to bake, when my mom and grandma started teaching me how to cook. Hardly anyone makes it anymore, that I know of. At least not around SoCal!
Welp, I guess I gotta try the Sally Lund bread now.

Rick, I'm a bigger fan of the Alto-Shaam Cook and Hold Ovens.
If I had a lot of extra cash Id have a half sized one out in my summer kitchen. I've got an old sealed Thermador out there that I use for all my slow cooking.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Keyser~I love Sally Lund bread. It was the first bread I ever learned how to bake, when my mom and grandma started teaching me how to cook. Hardly anyone makes it anymore, that I know of. At least not around SoCal!


Like I had said we'd start the kids in 4H and our own out on it. I baked it in a bundt pan. Have not done it for years but with a new grand daughter she'll be doing it in about 5 years. Her mother happens to be a baker who graduated from Johnson and Wales so I'll have some competition.

Greger had me hustling over to Trucchi's Supermarket so I can have braised ribs.
Quote:
Greger had me hustling over to Trucchi's Supermarket so I can have braised ribs.


*Jealous*

But I just took a big pan of Lasagna out of the oven so I wont be going hungry.
We had spaghetti for dinner, with salad and garlic bread. Tiramisu for dessert!

Keyser~I'm sure that this new grand daughter will be delighted to learn how to bake with her grandfather! ThumbsUp She will be so lucky to share that with you. smile
Japan police probe man who cooked own genitals
A young man stopped at a local restaurant after a day of roaming around in Mexico.

While sipping his tequila, he noticed a sizzling, scrumptious-looking platter being served at the next table.

It looked good.

It smelled good.

He asked the waiter, "What is that you just served?"

The waiter replied, "Ah senor, you have excellent taste! Those are bull's testicles from the bull fight this morning. A delicacy!"

The visitor, though momentarily daunted, said, "What the heck, I'm on holiday down here! Bring me an order!"

The waiter replied, "I am so sorry senor. There is only one serving per day because there is only one bull fight each morning. If you come early tomorrow and place your order, we will be sure to save you this delicacy!"

The next morning, the man returned, placed his order, and then that evening was served the one and only special delicacy of the day.

After a few bites, and inspecting the contents of his platter, he called to the waiter and said, "These are delicious, but they are much, much smaller than the ones I saw you serve yesterday!"

The waiter shrugged his shoulders and replied, "Si, Senor. Sometimes the bull wins."


And in other culinary news, inspired by the unbearable lightness of bean earlier in the thread, for lunch I made blackeye beans in a spicy tomato sauce (bacon, tomato, onions, garlic, smoked paprika, jalepeneo, cumin and a dash of worstershire).... topped off with black pudding..... beside a ny strip steak.

tonight is something a little lighter:

french onion soup, a green leaf salad and garlic and rosemary rolls.
Originally Posted By: Schlack
The waiter shrugged his shoulders and replied, "Si, Senor. Sometimes the bull wins."
LOL
If you're still searching for a bread breaking technique, you may want to try the book, Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day,that Greger referred to in an earlier post. I've been using their technique for some time and it produces delicious bread simply and easily that anyone can make. You don't have to knead the dough and you don't need any scales- just some measuring cups. I even started making Reuben sandwiches again using their deli-rye bread recipe. The only difference is that I use pastrami instead of corned beef and sauerkraut all the time- lots of sauerkraut.
Quote:
I made blackeye beans in a spicy tomato sauce

I don't care what it says on the package, Schlack, those are Blackeyed PEAS. Ya I know they aren't round like a proper English Pea, but you're not a proper Englishman and they're peas allright. just like crowders, field peas, conch peas, purple hulls and pinkeyes.
Try that same recipe without the Wooster sauce and add in a healthy dose of Allspice and a dash of cayenne pepper for an Island Flavor. My mama thinks I'm crazy because I hate to shell peas and prefer dried Blackeys to fresh ones. I can't tell you how many hours I spent as a kid sitting on the front porch with a pan of peas on my lap and a bucket to throw the empty shells into. Neighbors, aunts and uncles, neighbor kids and cousins would all join in and everyone got a share.
Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day.

I really want to try that someday. I'm stubborn about some things. Maybe when my old bread machine breaks, I only paid five bucks for it at a thrift store. It's been cranking out two loaves a week for about 4 years now.
Nice thing about bread machines is that you can use them as a very inexpensive small dough mixer. The other alternative is a really big, super-expensive table mixer that can handle a dough hook.

Toss the ingredients in the bread machine, set it for dough, and come back in an hour for perfect dough ready to put in a loaf pan, spread on a pizza pan, wrap around cocktail sausages, etc.

Or just let the machine bake it, too. Only hassle is that the dough hook ends up baked into the bottom of the loaf, and the loaves have a funny shape. But once you figure out how dry your bread flour is, and how active your yeast is, you really can have perfect fresh hot bread every day for just a couple of minutes to measure out the ingredients.
Ponderer, if you use a bread machine, here's a fun recipe for dinner rolls:

1 scant cup hot tap water
Add 1 cold egg to equal 1 cup
1 1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp sugar
3Tbsp olive oil
3 cup bread flour
1 scant Tbsp yeast
Measure your cup of water a little bit short and use hot tap water. Add an egg from the fridge to the water. This gets both to the right temp. No need to beat it, the machine will handle all that. Pour it in the machine add the rest of the ingredient in the order listed.
Make dough as usual adding more flour if it's sticky.
when it's done turn the flour out on a well floured breadboard.
Using a Bench Knife cut it in half, half it again and again and again, dredge it with flour if its sticky.
Cut half of the dough into a bunch of little chunks that will roll into about a 1 inch ball.
Have a muffin tin oiled and ready.
roll each piece of dough very quickly into a rough ball and toss them into the muffin tin, 3 to 5 in each section. depending on size. This recipe makes 18 rolls so you'll need three tins that hold six or a twelver and a sixer.
No need to let them rise at all. Just pop 'em in the oven and bake about 25 minutes at 350F til they are golden brown.
Serve right out of the oven.

If you don't have a Bench Knife get one!

They're also great for scooping up spills, or chopped onions from the cutting board. No kitchen should be without one.
I bought some Swai today. Had never heard of it but bought a pound ($3.99) and it appears to be a very basic white fish. Actually looks like Hake. I have no idea what the taste will be but to me just about all white fish tastes the same. I'll just pan fry it with a coating of panko and have some corn and our first garden harvest of spinach and peas.
Schlack~I would love your recipe for those garlic and rosemary rolls! ThumbsUp
Quote:
bought some Swai today. Had never heard of it but bought a pound ($3.99) and it appears to be a very basic white fish

I felt like Swai was maybe a notch better than Tilapia.
I'd sooner have Cod or Scrod or Halibut but the better fishies aren't really in my budget anymore.
Almost anything pan fried in Panko is good!
Quote:
I'd sooner have Cod or Scrod or Halibut

Dang-but something just sounds plain wrong with that name. Scrod.
Quote:
something just sounds plain wrong with that name. Scrod.

It's just a small Cod. When it comes to whitefish it's the best of the best.
Flounder is about as high as I can afford to go on the Fish Scale these days.
Tonight the po' folk at my home went to Fresh 'n Easy (Tesco, UK) and purchased Choice filet to serve grilled over plain risotto. The grilled meat was served with a Gorgonzola compound butter which melted on the meat as it was served.
Originally Posted By: Greger

It's just a small Cod. When it comes to whitefish it's the best of the best.
Flounder is about as high as I can afford to go on the Fish Scale these days.

When I was young, fish was the cheapest meat that you could buy.

How is that for an indication of how the oceans are being exploited, fished out and destroyed?
Thinking about fish tomorrow for dinner. Went to the farmer's market this morning: too expensive.

Cod comes frozen. My fish needs to be white, fresh and wild. Therefore, my only choices are halibut, sea bass, or petrale.

Salmon is too full-flavored for me.
'
Originally Posted By: california rick

Salmon is too full-flavored for me.

Mmmm... Salmon!! Morning, noon and night! Delish!

If you want to kill its delicious taste, just dribble a little sesame oil over it before serving it.

If you want to worry about fish, you should be thinking about heavy metals, radioactive cesium, and Gulf of Mexico poisonous chemicals!
I like to grill my salmon , brushing it with peanut oil, a few drops of sesame oil, a little mandarin orange juice, soy sauce, garlic and ginger. I serve it with pineapple fried rice, and grilled baby bok choy. Almond/coconut tfu for dessert! grin
About 20 (maybe 25 yrs ago?)McDonald's (Golden Arches)exclusively use cod in their fish sandwiches. What changed? Cod was expensive,so they switched to a less expensive white fish.

Years ago as a freshman in college, an erstwhile freshman, who was British, always had tuna subs whenever we (the collective went out on weekends). I asked him one day, why he always orders tuna and don't they have tuna in England? He answered, Of course, but it's a lower class fish. I don't think that I'll ever forget that.
Broiled in butter with garlic.
Put aside that the world is going to end in Dec. sometime because of the Mayan calender. I don't think that it will end, but I don't know anything anyway. Assuming that the world doesn't end (and with 4th approaching), I have a serious and truly meaningful issue that will affect the lives of millions of Americans: What tastes better? A hand-pressed hamburger or a hamburger press? I like hotdogs on the 4th, but a number of guests prefer hamburgers. The eternal question. I prefer dogs with a lot kraut, however, some prefer hamburgers. What do you think? I think that a hamburger press burger tastes better, but I don't know why. Any opinions or preferences, and why? Do you think that a hand pressed and formed burger tastes better than a hamburger pressed one?
Another thing, those store bought tomatoes taste like cardboard and are flavorless. Obviously GM tomatoes for distribution and sales. I understand that. I also understand flavor. Here's why they taste like sh*t.
We only buy the Costco hothouse "cocktail" tomatoes these days: They are sold in a plastic package but are all still on the vine, and are like very large cherry tomatoes. All in the 1.25" to 1.75" diameter range. They actually taste like homegrown, right off the vine. I think the "completely-tasteless but easy to harvest and pack" tomato variety was perfected long before anybody could do GM. It was just selective breeding, same as practiced at the dawn of agriculture.

As for forming burger patties, I used to hand form them but I read a while back that they come out much better if you form them very gently. If you fry them, then you can make very loose patties just by moving the ground beef around without ever pressing it together to get rid of the voids. I guess it cooks more uniformly when the hot fat can bubble up through the patty. This does work very well when you have to fry or broil them.

For the grill, I do press them together just a bit especially around the circumference, so they don't fall apart. Another trick: Form a patty of uniform thickness, and then press down in the center with your thumb. This prevents them from bulging into spheres as they cook.
I like both hamburgers and hotdogs. I like the Hebrew National all beef dogs, grilled, with some mustard and dill pickle relish. Or as a chili-cheese dog. I like my hamburgers hand-formed. I have the butcher grind a mixture of half round and half sirloin. I mix in a packet of dry Lipton onion soup mix and a bit of Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and garlic. we grill them and I put out lettuce(Green leaf), sliced tomatoes(usually from my neighbor's garden), sliced red onion, cheese, mustard(yellow and brown), mayo, ketchup, cheese and dill pickle slices.

But for the 4th this year, we are grilling NY strip steaks, grilled corn on the cob and grilled veggie skewers. Home made lemonade, iced tea and other cold beverages. Lemon meringue pie for dessert. And maybe even homemade strawberry ice cream. I have a lot of fresh strawberries4 lbs) I just bought at the local Farmers' Market for 5 dollars! And I have an electric ice cream maker. I just need to add eggs and cream.... yes, I need to make a trip to the grocery store tomorrow!
'
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan


I like hotdogs on the 4th....

I hope you are using European wieners for those hot dogs. grin
Ah, my son has also requested that we grill brats wrapped in bacon. So I will add those to the menu.
Dinner out last night! Blackened Sea Bass with a Raspberry Chipotle sauce! To Die For! Just to feckin' die for. OK?
Tonight a fresh loaf of whole wheat bran bread, Stuffed Grape leaves (Dolmathakias) and a pint of Guinness....okay...two pints C:
I like Burgers, I like Dogs. I like damn near everything.
I can't afford those fancy European wieners made from Choice Canadian horsemeat. And don't act like you don't know what I'm talking about numan!
Bacon wrapped deep fried corn dogs are pretty good too Scout!
Mmmm, bacon-wrapped corn dogs! ThumbsUp
Wow, that's some hamburger! I'll try combining sirloin with ground round next time. I like Nathan's hotdogs. Brats as well as sweet Italian sausage are great on the grill. I top with cold salsa.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Mmmm, bacon-wrapped corn dogs! ThumbsUp

That's pretty decadent.

Last night, the po' at my house had blanched, then halved and sauted in eeov and buddah, Brussels sprouts, leftover risotto and thawed lobster tail frozen from Valentine's weekend when they were $5.00/6oz tail.

Only po' people eat lobster tail purchased six month ago - on sale. smile
Quote:
eeov
Huh? EVOO?
I mean: evoo blush

(Hey! I just had brain surgery 21 days ago - today! wink )
This afternoon: Nathan hot dogs, kraut, yellow mustard and relish and/or hamburgers topped with cheddar or Swiss, cold tomato, romaine, onion, jalapenos , and mayo. Boston baked beans, cold potato salad, iced tea/cold beer, and cold watermelon or ice cream (blueberry/strawberry topping)and whipped cream sprinkled with crushed pecans or shaved chocolate or butterscotch. Watch Jaws afterwards, my favorite 4th holiday movie.
Quote:
Mmmm, bacon-wrapped corn dogs!


With deep fried ice cream for desert?
deep fried ice cream is pretty good. you use cinnamon?

Quote:
With deep fried ice cream for desert?

I don't see why not!

The easiest way to make deep fried ice cream is to simply wrap hard frozen balls of ice cream in two slices of white bread with the crusts cut off. squeeze the bread around the ice cream then refreeze.
1. put a pan in the freezer for 2 hours or overnite

2. scoop balls of ice cream into the cold pan and refreeze for an hour or more

3. wrap bread around ice cream, packing it like a snowball
Refreeze for an hour or more

4. fry in very hot oil(375F) until golden

5. Serve with chocolate sauce and whipped cream
'
I am amazed by the immensity of garbage-calories in such a dish!!

How true is the old English proverb :

YOU DIG YOUR GRAVE WITH YOUR TEETH
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Wow, that's some hamburger! I'll try combining sirloin with ground round next time. I like Nathan's hotdogs. Brats as well as sweet Italian sausage are great on the grill. I top with cold salsa.


Sometimes we put Thousand Island dressing on the hamburgers/cheeseburgers. It makes them taste like In-N-Out burgers. ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: numan
'
I am amazed by the immensity of garbage-calories in such a dish!!

How true is the old English proverb :

YOU DIG YOUR GRAVE WITH YOUR TEETH


What is your favorite meal(regardless of what day it is)?
Tonight the po' folk at house are having hot dogs (Costco, Kirkland) with Oro-wheat multi-grain bun and Chinese chicken salad (rotisserie chicken, romaine lettuce, red cabbage, grated carrots, cashews, mandarin orange slices, chopped green onion, crispy won-ton, tossed in a Asian-Ginger vinaigrette).

The salad was the negotiated trade-off for consuming a hot dog. (Bob eats really healthy).

Why Costco Kirkland? It's the only hot dog I can find with no corn syrup and relative few preservatives.
I like fried foods, but I try to stay away from them. As numan pointed out, fried anything is not good for anyone's health. But every once in a while, I indulge. Especially when it is Chinese New Year and I make fried pork wontons(ancient family recipe)! grin
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
Mmmm, bacon-wrapped corn dogs!


With deep fried ice cream for desert?


I am not a fan of fried ice cream, but I love fried pies!
Kielbasa, strip steak, corn and vegetables on the grill. Tsingtao beer and sun tea for beverage. Klondike bars for desert. Walk to the local carnival and have some fried dough and watch the fireworks.
For some reason this was on the menu somewhere* today



*the internet.

Fried Dollar, now only 1.99
And someone-probably southern will pay money to eat that! LOL
Originally Posted By: california rick
Tonight the po' folk at house are having hot dogs (Costco, Kirkland) with Oro-wheat multi-grain bun and Chinese chicken salad (rotisserie chicken, romaine lettuce, red cabbage, grated carrots, cashews, mandarin orange slices, chopped green onion, crispy won-ton, tossed in a Asian-Ginger vinaigrette).

The salad was the negotiated trade-off for consuming a hot dog. (Bob eats really healthy).

Why Costco Kirkland? It's the only hot dog I can find with no corn syrup and relative few preservatives.


I like your Chinese chicken salad-Mine is similar, but I use thin-sliced almonds and Napa cabbage instead of red. Do you make your own dressing?
No, I get it at Fresh 'N Easy (Tesco, UK). It's called: Asian-ginger dressing. I get the crispy wonton's at Fresh 'N Easy too.

I like red cabbage because of the color against the dark green outer romaine lettuces and bright orange carrots shavings. (I save the inner romaine leaves for Caesar salads).

I have some Makasa Kyoto Bronze plate ware, that when the salad is mounded into the center of the plate, all of the colors combined makes the colorful salad really pop.

Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Schlack~I would love your recipe for those garlic and rosemary rolls! ThumbsUp


oops only catching up now,

yer standard bread recipie.

flour, yeast, salt, water.

add olice oil, crushed garlic, chopped fresh rosemary, and cracked black pepper (only a small touch as it can overpower everything else)

exact quantities are up to you. I love a lot of garlic.

looking back on that dinner, it would have been better to reduce the number of competing flavours. Tomorrow i will be trying the bread with just the cracked black pepper. (and a far longer second prooving)
Oh. Schlack, that reminds me, have you ever tossed a half cup or so of dehydrated onion into the dough? Not onion powder, the chopped onion flakes. It makes a really nice bread.
Chopped walnuts is another one.
Thanks, schlack! And Greger, your additions sound good, too. I'll have try all of them! ThumbsUp
I know that it is hot out here, but my family was begging for my beef stew. So it's in the crock pot cooking away. We'll have it with some artisan-style bread from my local bakery(way to hot to put the oven on!) and some good red wine to drink(yes, Greger-it's a burgundy-Robert Mondavi, and yes, I did put it in my stew!) grin
It's almost too hot to eat here, too, in the Panhandle. Almost. Fortunately, tomatoes are plentiful, and I love tomato sandwiches. Very simple. Cold sliced tomato on toasted whole wheat (or whatever you prefer), mayo, and salt and pepper. Along with ice tea it hits the spot. Also, seafood salad is great in the heat. Imitation crab legs, mayo, diced celery and onion, and some Old Bay Seasoning on a sandwich with lettuce and tomato or open plate on a bed of lettuce with some diced tomatoes. It's easy and quick. And just enough to satisfy and keep you going in the hot weather.
Quote:
but my family was begging for my beef stew

Care to share your recipe? Beef stew is one of my favorites. I make a pretty good one (according to me) but dont really use a recipe.
LOBSTER! Market Basket has them at $3.99 a pound. Hannaford's had strip steak at $6.99 and I had discounts of about $2 a package. Surf and turf. You peasants can enjoy the hamburger helper without the hamburg.
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
but my family was begging for my beef stew

Care to share your recipe? Beef stew is one of my favorites. I make a pretty good one (according to me) but dont really use a recipe.


ohh beef stew is a touchy subject round here....

Favourite stews

Yes, it is tomato season. The garden goes from none to too many in nothing flat.

I have been making my favorite 'clean out the garden' recipe ... tabouli. Tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, and parsley. This time of year I make it with bulgur wheat because there is no cooking. When the weather is cooler, I use cooked quinoa instead of bulgur because it is a protein for starch trade.

Either way it is cool and yummy ... and gets some of the garden veggies out of the refrigerator so you can bring in more.
Thanks schlacky. I figured Donna had posted the recipe sometime in the past. Ill give it a try--in the slowcooker!
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
but my family was begging for my beef stew

Care to share your recipe? Beef stew is one of my favorites. I make a pretty good one (according to me) but dont really use a recipe.


ohh beef stew is a touchy subject round here....

Favourite stews




Ah yes. The Danish question: cut up your own beef or buy it pre-cut. (stew beef or not stew beef. That is the question.)
Chicken-fried dollar:

Basic for a high-fiber, high-fat menu. Warning, though: subject to inflation without notice, potentially leading to extreme heartburn.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Chicken-fried dollar:

Basic for a high-fiber, high-fat menu. Warning, though: subject to inflation without notice, potentially leading to extreme heartburn.


And they make a real great salsa, too.
And pico de gallo ... yum!
schlack-thanks for finding that! And Ken, you can substitute some small boiling onions(pearl onions) in place of the cut up yellow onion. It is purely up to personal taste.

Now my family is asking for my fried wontons!
Like this:



Oh, you said wonton, not wanton. Never mind.
The po' folks at my house are havin' chicken cacciatore, polenta, and a yet to be determined green veggie.
Angus Ribeye Steaks seared over natural lump charcoal at 1000F. Avocado, fried cheese, and tostones(green plantains)
with freshly baked yeast rolls.
Homemade ice cream and apple praline pie for dessert.
What time's dinner? I have wine.
Holy cow, Gregger ... you fry and BAKE in this weather? Do you have an outdoor kitchen?

I was going to brag about having lentil tacos ... because though my family is omnivorous, we occasionally have a meatless night. I simmer the beans on the side burner of our gas grill outside.

And yes, I admit we use gas instead of virgin charcoal. You make me feel culinarily (is that a word?) challenged.
An indian evening last night.

tandoori chicken - my own secret spice blend

home made garlic and coriander naan bread

rustic salad of tomatos, cucumber and scallion, drenched in lemon juice

a sharp mint riata.



Did enough chicken for 2 days, making chicken tikka masala tonight, served with basmati rice and the remainder of the riata.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Like this:



Oh, you said wonton, not wanton. Never mind.


ROTFMOL
Originally Posted By: Schlack
An indian evening last night.

tandoori chicken - my own secret spice blend

home made garlic and coriander naan bread

rustic salad of tomatos, cucumber and scallion, drenched in lemon juice

a sharp mint riata.



Did enough chicken for 2 days, making chicken tikka masala tonight, served with basmati rice and the remainder of the riata.


Your menu sounds yummy, schlack! There is an Indian restaurant near me that serves food like this. I love to go there. Unfortunately Mr. Scoutgal does not like Indian food-except for garlic naan. So I usually go with a friend, or my sister.

I make that salad all the time at home! I cut cherry tomatoes in half, and I thick slice and quarter the cucumber. A little sprinkle of kosher salt and cracked pepper is delicious on it!
Quote:
Holy cow, Gregger ... you fry and BAKE in this weather? Do you have an outdoor kitchen?

Uh...yeah. I have a summer kitchen equipped with an oven, a couple of rotisseries, and the Big Green Egg. The BGE is all the way outside, the rest is inside a screened porch.
I fry and bake inside mostly and cook most of the meat outside. Truth is it's too hot to cook outdoors this time of year. Without air conditioning I'd never use anything but the George Foreman grill indoors.

Pie crusts are a bit of a challenge in the summer though.
Mmmmm... we had Greger sliders tonight, grilled on the Cobb ten briquet grill. Pretzel slider buns, cheddar, fresh picked lettuce, pickles and condiments. The Jack Russells were on enhanced mooch watch and Vinnie the Cat was ready for fisticuffs over the leftovers.

The grill aroma is still wafting in the window as I sip a Beefeater and Q-tonic and watch those entertaining Englishmen on Top Gear.
I hope they were as good as I promised...
Yas, they were!
Got company - daughter and her new hubby, plus grandson Zarko. Had a little cookout last night, something we call trail fajitas cooked over a campfire. The recipe and cooking method hearken back to when my girlfriend and I traveled to Copper Canyon in Mexico, to get married. We signed up for a 10 day package that included stays at the Sierra Lodge located at the 8000' elevation of the rim, and a sister hotel (built like a 3-d MC Esher painting) located in downtown Batopilas.

There were many guided hikes, which usually included a lunch of trail fajitas, as described below.

The cook had brought along containers filled with pork loin slices marinated in olive oil with jalapenos (whole and chopped), cilantro, beer, and soy sauce. A campfire was built and the pork marinade slopped into a large homemade wok (a farming disc with the hole welded up) where it boiled and sizzled until almost all of the juice was gone. As it browned, more beer was added (Tecate in a can) causing the pan to deglaze and to make a caramel-colored sauce. Just before that juice was gone, tortillas were placed and turned over the meat, put in the hands of the hungry hikers, and filled with fajita makings. It was socially required to also eat at least one of the whole jalapenos.

Mmmm, mmmm, good!

Here's a pan cooking in the back yard over the Bucket O' Fire (an invention of mine...) using pinyon pine.


Pizza from scratch!

Got a present of a pizza stone from one of the brothers and put it to good use.

Previous nights pasta sauce* on dough topped with roasted veg**, salami and peperoni.... mozarella on her side none on mine.

excellent, will make again

*tomato, onion, bacon, sweet red pepper, fresh basil, fresh parsley oregano, balsamic vinegar, tonnes of garlic and black pepper.

**onion, zuchinni, eggplant, red pepper, carrots, (olive oilt, balsamic, soy, Oregano)

Excellet crispy outer rim, but a bit doughy in the middle. Used slightly too much toppings and will seperate the dough into 2 pizzas next time.

Very pleased with 1st attempt - it will fit nicely into my weekday recipies.

bit of effort making the dough, but well worth it.
You have to preheat a pizza stone for a very long time (EG. an hour), to get it all up to temperature right through to the center. It has to be able to transfer a lot of heat very quickly, and it can't do that if only the outer few millimeters are hot.

Sometimes I want a really thick high-rise crust, so I'll cook the pizza skin without topping until it is firm and slightly brown. Then I add all the sauce, toppings, cheese, etc. and put it back in the oven until that all browns and sizzles. Comes out rather like french bread pizza.
I preheated for about half an hour, i might leave it longer next time.
One trick is to sprinkle a good dose of herb on the top to help get the pizza baked and you stoned.
Quote:
sprinkle a good dose of herb on the top to help get the pizza baked and you stoned.

rolleyes
This from a guy who puts the fire inside a potjie pot....

Schlack did you use the pizza dough recipe I recommended?
Trader Joes Chicken Marsala, mashed red pots, and garden salad.

(I burnt last week's home-made attempt to make chicken marsala. Yes, the smoke detectors went off... blush )
Sometimes I come in here and zone out while dinner overcooks.

I made slow braised short ribs yesterday. 3 hours at 300 was still a little too hot. Next time I'll go for about 4 1/2 hours at 250. They were very very good. But not perfect.
The braising liquid is going to make some incredible soup.
A few weeks ago, I made chicken cacciatore in the crock pot and had a ton of sauce left over. I used it on pasta a few times and even on egg plant parmesan. Strange, the longer in the fridge (...at 34 F) the better is tasted.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
sprinkle a good dose of herb on the top to help get the pizza baked and you stoned.

rolleyes
This from a guy who puts the fire inside a potjie pot....

Schlack did you use the pizza dough recipe I recommended?


Thats the bunny. Although i just used the strong flour I had iat home. Will pick up some Tipo 00 next chance i get.
Originally Posted By: california rick
A few weeks ago, I made chicken cacciatore in the crock pot and had a ton of sauce left over. I used it on pasta a few times and even on egg plant parmesan. Strange, the longer in the fridge (...at 34 F) the better is tasted.
Some sauces, especially tomato, taste better after they've rotted aged for a few days in the refrigerator. Tomato sauce usually tastes better the second day.
I wasn't terribly impressed with the Italian type "00" flour and it was godawful expensive. Any strong(high gluten) flour will work. Most folks here use King Arthur brand bread flour. I suggest you always sift it for pizza dough to aerate it before you start. If you can find wheat gluten in the market you can add a few tablespoons to strengthen the flour a little more.

I tend to try to pile too many toppings on the pizza and wind up with a "wet" pizza when I do. Less is usually better.
Originally Posted By: Greger

rolleyes
This from a guy who puts the fire inside a potjie pot....

Does this mean you are not impressed by the Bucket O' Fire? I should mention its inspiration and features:

Inspired by the old carpenter's method of punching airholes near the bottom of a metal 5-gallon bucket and burning wood scraps for a little heat while working on frigid job sites, the cast iron Bucket O' Fire is a more upscale back yard campfire device. Unlike a campfire, the Bucket O' Fire is raised up off the ground with its sides at an appropriate level for radiating heat to a full circle of sitting, or standing, campers. There is excellent containment of the fire, embers, and ashes, leaving no messy campfire ring or detritus. In addition, the Bucket O' Fire provides a convenient rack for grilling or supporting cookware over the fire. If the festivities conclude before the fire is out, one merely places the cast iron lid over the whole shebang, which results in the remaining wood fuel being converted into charcoal, ready for the next entertainment event.

A potjie pot it definitely is not.
Originally Posted By: Greger
I tend to try to pile too many toppings on the pizza and wind up with a "wet" pizza when I do. Less is usually better.

When I was in Italy, the pizza which I ate was a very thin crust. The crust was kind of sweet - almost like a pastry dough. The toppings? Nary there. The toppings were extremely light. It was the crust which was the star.

Here in the U.S. it's the opposite: The toppings are the star.

Bob and I found a good takeaway pizza that delivers. The crusts are whole wheat and the pizza toppings we have settled on are pesto, basil, mozz cheese, tomatoes. Simple. Delicious. Healthy.
Pizza in Italy is cooked in ungodly hot ovens, 1000-1500 degrees. It takes only seconds to cook them. I've heard from others how good it is over there.
I'm a bread lover and a baker so the crust is always the most important thing for me.

I like the idea of whole wheat but I really don't like the taste of it and the gluten content is far too low for Pizza. The whole wheat crust you're getting probably has less than a third of type "00" whole wheat flour and it's likely specially formulated for pizza crust. Home bakers just can't get our hands on this type of flour which is sold only in 50 lb bags through wholesalers.
Quote:
Pizza in Italy is cooked in ungodly hot ovens, 1000-1500 degrees. It takes only seconds to cook them.

We have one right here in town not far from the house. It is excellent although I dont eat pizza that much. The crusts are thin and they dont put much stuff on them but what they do put on is mighty tasty.
Quote:
is pizza made in the authentic Italian style. Fresh ingredients are layered on handmade dough, then cooked for 90 seconds in a domed-shaped, wood-burning oven that reaches temperatures of up to 1,500 degrees. The intense heat and fire impart a slight rustic char. The result is a luscious blend of flavors on a light and tender crust.

Link
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
...The crusts are thin and they dont put much stuff on them but what they do put on is mighty tasty.
Quote:
is pizza made in the authentic Italian style. Fresh ingredients are layered on handmade dough, then cooked for 90 seconds in a domed-shaped, wood-burning oven that reaches temperatures of up to 1,500 degrees. The intense heat and fire impart a slight rustic char. The result is a luscious blend of flavors on a light and tender crust.

Link

I'm jealous. Seriously. frown
From what I have read there are still very few of these types of restaurants in the US, but anything popular that makes a buck quickly becomes over saturated nationwide. I figure every heavily populated area will soon have one, the quirk being Eugene isnt one.

I found this in your neck--ok not really close by but close enough:
Quote:
Now Anthony Mangieri, a fanatically dedicated young pizza maker from New Jersey with Neapolitan roots, has opened his own authentic Naples-style pizzeria, Una Pizza Napoletana, in San Francisco. His small, newly built SoMa pizzeria with a soaring ceiling is an austere temple to pizza, with a glowing pizza oven altar at the center attended by a pizza-making priest who sets all the rituals.

Link

It seems more basic than our restaurant but give it time. It will soon be over the top if it proves popular. BTW those two guys in Eugene also own a stupendous made from scratch Italian restaurant (they started that first about 15 years ago) and there is a link to that at the end of my previous link to their local pizzeria if you care to peruse.
Or you can do it at home!
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
...BTW those two guys in Eugene also own a stupendous made from scratch Italian restaurant (they started that first about 15 years ago) and there is a link to that at the end of my previous link to their local pizzeria if you care to peruse.

Yes, I saw the link two days ago.

Supposedly we have a Little Italy in San Francisco - in fact BofA started in San Francisco as Bank of Italy - I've never found food in SF like the food in Italy.

Thanks for the SF link Ken, I will definitely try the restaurant as I am a "foodie."
Originally Posted By: Greger
Or you can do it at home!

LOL

I'll get right on that Gregor.

I won't have room for cabinets, a range, a refrigerator, a sink - but I'll have a pizza oven!! smile
...from Ken's Eugene, OR link:



This is how I remember the pizzas in Venice, Italy. The picture screams: Delizioso!
I didn't provide a link, Rick but that's an outdoor pizza oven.
You just put it on the patio.
Think of it as a high end gas grill.
Kalamazoo Gourmet
Grilled Alaskan Pollock
with lemon herb butter, capers, and Thai Chili Paste.
Baked Teriyaki chicken (Soy Vay marinade)
Brown Rice
Fresh steamed broccoli

Home-made Key Lime Meringue Pie
Grilled steak(NY Strip) with herbed garlic butter, wild rice(cooked in beef broth) and broccoli. Fresh fruit salad for dessert. Mango, pineapple, papaya, banana and toasted coconut flakes. Salad is made(I add the toasted coconut just before serving), fresh broccoli cleaned and cut-ready for the steamer, and steaks are getting up to room temperature to be grilled! I mad the herbed garlic butter already. I can slice it and let it melt on the steaks, once they are grilled.
Next time, Scout, try a Gorgonzola-compound butter on those steaks! ThumbsUp
Appetizer of corn chips and homemade salsa and Mexican beer (long hot hike down and back up Little Dry Creek today). Garlic shrimp grilled on the Cobb in a salad of fresh greens from the garden.
Quote:
try a Gorgonzola-compound butter on those steaks!

!
Or even better yet foie gras!


Haven't your heard Gregor - foie gras was banned on July 1, 2012 in Cali. Anyway, isn't this thread about poor folks' eatins? Hmm
Quote:
isn't this thread about poor folks' eatins?

Nope, the thread title is kind of a joke, maybe it's a Southern colloquialism, I dunno, it's just something I've heard all my life, when we'd sit down to an especially good meal someone was liable to say "I wonder what the poor folks are eatin' tonight."
Besides, just because I'm poor doesn't mean I can't occasionally indulge in fine dining. Foie gras is one of the most exquisite foods in the world. A tiny bit of foie gras complements the flavor of steak just like a Gorgonzola or Stilton cheese. Should those be banned because they have mold growing in them?
Originally Posted By: Greger
...just like a Gorgonzola or Stilton cheese. Should those be banned because they have mold growing in them?

No cheeses were harmed in their production. Fois gras? Force-feeding a duck is inhumane. smile
Many things that occur in the meat industry might be considered inhumane by some. I don't feel that the ducks are particularly mistreated. These aren't pets they are food.
Originally Posted By: Gregor
These aren't pets they are food.

We Californians have decided that ducks are persona non grata at the dinner table. smile
Have you Californians completely banned the sale of ducks in your state? Even though ducks in general are treated far more humanely than chickens or turkeys? Very odd state you live in.
No ducks haven't been completely banned from the dinner table - just their livers.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Next time, Scout, try a Gorgonzola-compound butter on those steaks! ThumbsUp


I would, but Mr. Scoutgal and my son do not like Gorgonzola or Blue Cheese. It is hard enough to get them to have the herbal butter. rolleyes
I'm going to eat plenty of foie gras when I leave for Maryland and Virginia next month! grin
Second shot at pizza last night. On a tip i knocked the dough back twice before rolling it out.

2 X pizzas instead of one and a bit easier on the toppings, onion, salami, pepperoni, sauce and mozzarella (on hers)

much better crust, will eat again.

Tonight, continuing the italian theme, algio e olio, with a simple tomato and lettuce salad, balsamic vinegarette.


Picked up some chipotles in adobo (a rarity here!) and have some black beans soaking overnight, will be cooking em up with onion, bacon and tomaters and sweetcorn. to be served with rice and garlic yoghurt.
Shlack, rather than rolling the dough try to stretch it out by hand.
like this

I'm not gonna lie to you and tell you I can do it as well as this pizza man but you'll get a better crust if you don't roll it. A little bit of corn meal on the pizza peal helps it slide off better too. I occasionally use a perforated pizza pan but it seems like every time I do I burn myself on the damned thing.

My teenage sous chef and I just made 5 pans of Baclava and 200 pieces each of Spanakopita triangles and Spiced Lamb triangles for a wine event on Friday night.
I suggest that you liberally disperse cornmeal on the pizza peel. A little doesn't work, especially with pizza. Also, watch the toppings. Too much and too heavy also tends to cause the pizza to drag and, consequently, to stick and you'll wind up with a calzone, which is also delicious, but not your intent.
Going to make Sloppy Joes tonight at Mr. Scoutgal's request. He likes that new chunky Manwich sauce. I am not fond of these, but I make them every so often for the hubby. I'll make a nice green salad to go with the Sloppy Joes. At least I know I will enjoy that! grin
Originally Posted By: Greger
Shlack, rather than rolling the dough try to stretch it out by hand.
like this



Nice greg, will have to try that.

Tonights feast was a simple roast chicken, roasted marinaded vegtables (onion, pepper,courgette, carrot), boiled baby new potatoes and gravy.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Going to make Sloppy Joes tonight at Mr. Scoutgal's request. He likes that new chunky Manwich sauce. I am not fond of these, but I make them every so often for the hubby. I'll make a nice green salad to go with the Sloppy Joes. At least I know I will enjoy that! grin

Hope you're serving said sandwich on whole-grain bun (Orowheat) with no corn syrup (Orowheat).

smile
Scoutgal, a side of cold, crisp coleslaw works very well with sloppy joes.
A side of crisp coleslaw works very well with anything.
Sloppy Joe and coleslaw....hell ya!

But let's put some of these on the plate too...

I had hot dogs grilled on the Cobb Cooker, Sweet Potatoes, and Onion Rings. I grew the onions and sweet potatoes....
Any of you ever heard of poutine? When I was in Montreal last weekend our host and hostess made sure we got an opportunity to eat poutine:

French fries smothered in beef gravy and melted cheese curds. Some places use melted mozzarella, some use what they call squeaky cheese, some use cheddar cheese curds.

I wanted mine served over crackers, but couldn't get anyone to serve them that way:


BTW the poutine was pretty good.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Going to make Sloppy Joes tonight at Mr. Scoutgal's request. He likes that new chunky Manwich sauce. I am not fond of these, but I make them every so often for the hubby. I'll make a nice green salad to go with the Sloppy Joes. At least I know I will enjoy that! grin

Hope you're serving said sandwich on whole-grain bun (Orowheat) with no corn syrup (Orowheat).

smile


I always get whole whet breads, and I try to get onws made with no hfcs, because there is too much sugar(carbs) content otherwise. I did get buns with sesame seeds! grin
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
A side of crisp coleslaw works very well with anything.


I do not like coleslaw. But than you for the suggestion. smile
Originally Posted By: Greger
Sloppy Joe and coleslaw....hell ya!

But let's put some of these on the plate too...

I had hot dogs grilled on the Cobb Cooker, Sweet Potatoes, and Onion Rings. I grew the onions and sweet potatoes....


Now that(onion rings) I'll eat! We like to dip them in blue cheese dressing or salsa! And BTW, Greger-those onion rings look delish! ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Any of you ever heard of poutine? When I was in Montreal last weekend our host and hostess made sure we got an opportunity to eat poutine:

French fries smothered in beef gravy and melted cheese curds. Some places use melted mozzarella, some use what they call squeaky cheese, some use cheddar cheese curds.

I wanted mine served over crackers, but couldn't get anyone to serve them that way:


BTW the poutine was pretty good.


I don't know if I've ever had poutine, but it sounds very similar to chili cheese fries, or wet fries. I like the chili-cheese version.
schlack-How do you cook your courgettes(zucchini)? I like to steam or grill them with a little butter, olive oil and garlic. For a change of pace, I thick slice them and cook them with diced peeled tomatoes, garlic and basil.

And zucchini makes some good sweet bread, too.
Took some home made spaghetti sauce out of the freezer this morning, and I just got back from the market where I bought sweet Italian sausage and the makings for a salad and garlic bread. I have a bottle of chianti, and some olive oil, Italian herbs and balsamic vinegar for an appetizer. Mange!
I skipped dinner and went straight to dessert..

Peach Pie
Looks great! Any occult or Pagan significance to the 8 stars?
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
schlack-How do you cook your courgettes(zucchini)? I like to steam or grill them with a little butter, olive oil and garlic. For a change of pace, I thick slice them and cook them with diced peeled tomatoes, garlic and basil.

And zucchini makes some good sweet bread, too.

ThumbsUp I cook the zucchini with tomatoes, garlic, and basil, too. I also add just a little oregano and top with Parmesan.
Quote:
Any occult or Pagan significance to the 8 stars?

Nope, just playing with scraps of leftover dough. Mabon is the next holiday, the harvest sabbat and autumn equinox. Around September 20-22.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
schlack-How do you cook your courgettes(zucchini)? I like to steam or grill them with a little butter, olive oil and garlic. For a change of pace, I thick slice them and cook them with diced peeled tomatoes, garlic and basil.

And zucchini makes some good sweet bread, too.

ThumbsUp I cook the zucchini with tomatoes, garlic, and basil, too. I also add just a little oregano and top with Parmesan.


Mmmm, that sounds yummy! laugh
Greger~That peach pie looks delicious! Reminds me of the house I grew up in, and our peach tree in the front yard. We would pick those peaches and make peach pie, peach cobbler, fried pies and peach ice cream-and of course, just eating a plain ol peach!


Hurricane Party tomorrow night at Chez Mark's Kitchen!

************************

An aged and crumbly cheese from the Isle of Man

with fruit and a relish tray.

Zin 91 old vine California Zinfandel(2009)

Fried green tomatoes and Chorizo stuffed jalapeo poppers

Spinach Salad topped with cold smoked Nova Salmon, toasted pine nuts and a creamy lemon dill dressing.

Slow cooked pork loin back ribs crusted with herbs and pecans.
Green beans, red onions and capers sauteed in butter and white wine.
Roasted sweet potatoes, parsnips, carrots and Swedes.
Matched with Cigar Box Argentinian Malbec (2011)

Bourbon Pecan Pie and(or) New York Style Cheesecake with double Dutch chocolate topping.
Homemade vanilla ice cream.
Costa Rican coffee with a splash of Brandy.

Then a glass of port and a bowl of fine weed.
************************

Right now the cheesecake is in the oven, the chocolate sauce is made and the pie crust is chilling. All the rest is yet to be done.
That looked like a yummy dinner, Greger!
Originally Posted By: Greger
...Then a glass of port and a bowl of fine weed.

Dandelion greens?
Quote:
Dandelion greens?

Not exactly. But we decided to open a bottle of Eiswein rather than have the Port.
Them danged Russians are beating us in another technology race - what is it with those people, anyway??

high tech food production
Quote:
In 2003 the Russian President signed into law a further Private Garden Plot Act enabling Russian citizens to receive free of charge from the state, plots of land in private inheritable ownership. Sizes of the plots differ by region but are between one and three hectares each [1 hectare = 2.2 acres]. Produce grown on these plots is not subject to taxation. A further subsequent law to facilitate the acquisition of land for gardening was passed in June 2006. (according to a footnote in Who We Are by Vladimir Megre, pg. 42)
I'd like to see more in the way of community gardens here but I'm not holding out much hope for it in the near future. Americans are so enthralled with the idea of growing and caring for grass and lawns that the concept of growing anything edible seems to have gone the way of the horse and buggy.
Is your garden troll getting the fall crops in Logtroll?
It's time to plant the cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts and rutabagas.
It's still a little early for me here but I've tilled the garden and am starting seeds for some late warm weather crops.
In a few weeks I'll get the Cole crops in.
Welp, last night the po' folks at my house ate a disastrous Thai pasta chicken salad. I need a really good spicy peanut dressing - like fail proof, thanks.

Trader Joes make a Thai pasta chicken salad. I can make the salad part really well - I just can't make the dressing. Hmm

UPDATE: I just had leftovers and it was much better - good actually. Last night the sauce was so spicy, my esophagus closed up and my eyes and nose watered.
The garden troll has been bringing stuff by for a month or so, and selling some to the Food Co-op and some other customers she runs across. My wife got a good patch going here at home, too, so the salads have been good for about a month, as well. The taters are good enough to dig some and beets are now a regular. A friend of ours has liver cancer and the chemo/radiation stuff has failed to put it into remission, so he is on a serious organic juicing diet, which is where we are putting much of our produce now. It's also an incentive to improve and expand our productivity and to try and get the greenhouse producing into the winter.

I cut down some Siberian Elms in the back yard yesterday (they are a water sucking invasive, very prolific and hard to eradicate, but the wood makes nice lumber) in preparation for getting more yard into garden and orchard. Mrs. Logtroll is planting three cherry trees as we post and I am designing the water harvesting system from the roof and greywater that I hope to have in place next season.

Tonight, we have a beef tip roast on the Cobb (with some pinyon smoke) and will have another great greens-cukes-beets-tamaters salad and some garlic-fried boiled new taters. Mmmmm! And a gin & tonic is helping me write.

Up on the list is to make my own tonic, the store stuff is too sweet and Fevertree (my favorite) and Q-Tonic are expensive and hard to come by.
Meat loaf, roasted beets and Brussels sprouts for supper tonight at the neighbors with some nice Scottish Shortbread I made last night for dessert, along with copious amounts of George Dickel #12.
It's still too hot for lettuce here but I'm dying for a fresh picked salad. I've got cucumber, Tomato, and eggplant seeds started in trays and I'm itching to get the garden going again.
Quote:
...Siberian Elms...

Who tought it a good ider to bring Saberian elms to Noo Meckseeko?
Cover your ears eyes, Greger.

The guys are having bratburgers. Your butcher may not have heard of this particular (ahem) delicacy. It is bratwurst stuff, raw and not in a casing, with lots of jalapenas, formed into a patty.

Here in the 'burg, it's considered real man food. When tailgating, a guy doesn't have to choose between a burger and a brat, he can have this hybridized thing. I tried it once, and wasn't crazy about the ... um ... juiciness, and it's probably heart-attack bait so I always have something else.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Quote:
...Siberian Elms...

Who tought it a good ider to bring Saberian elms to Noo Meckseeko?

May I enquire about the provenance of your dialect, crick? Or did you just return from having a root canal done?
baking fresh french bread, brule shape using a baguette recipe.
I think you mean boule shape. Them aren't much for slicing but they are perfect to tear chunks off of. Mine usually settle too much and I wish I had a cake ring to kinda hold them up while they bake.
If it works would you share the recipe?
I made a pecan bread today. A total disaster. After I set it out to proof I forgot all about it and it rose and rose and flowed over all four sides of the pan onto the counter. I sorta flipped it all back in the pan and baked it anyway. It'll make good toast...
Quote:
bratburgers

I don't think any butchers around here make brats so nope they would'na heard of it.
But it sounds good to me! Greasiness is not the same as juiciness. Lotsa times butchers add extra fat into whatever they are making sausage out of. It turns worthless scraps into $3.99 a pound sausage.
We hafta settle for Johnsonville brats or some prepackaged variety here, seems like all the butchers make is Italian sausage.
Originally Posted By: Greger
I think you mean boule shape. Them aren't much for slicing but they are perfect to tear chunks off of. Mine usually settle too much and I wish I had a cake ring to kinda hold them up while they bake.
If it works would you share the recipe?
I made a pecan bread today. A total disaster. After I set it out to proof I forgot all about it and it rose and rose and flowed over all four sides of the pan onto the counter. I sorta flipped it all back in the pan and baked it anyway. It'll make good toast...
yes, the shape. however, it seems that it was a little small and taller, if you will, than i anticipated. that said, the bread is excellent and i am eating some for breakfast. it's a baguette recipe i found in a bread book focusing on european breads. shaping it this way has given me a more dense bread. the recipe is long and drawn out but if i get time i will copy it down and share it.
I read somewhere that Julia Child's French bread recipe takes something like 14 hours to make. It aint easy to replicate at home what professional bakers can produce. The biggest difference is that their ovens are injected with steam which delivers the crustiness that we home bakers are forever trying to achieve.
King Arthur Flour has come up with this answer...

Quote:
Bell-shaped cloche perfectly cradles a 3-cup-of-flour loaf as it rises.
Put the pan in the oven, cover it with the lid, and steam generated by the baking bread emulates a steam-injected oven, making the crispy, crackly crust of your dreams (and a moist, chewy interior, too.)

I make baguettes a lot and have a three loaf perforated baguette pan that does a great job.
If you don't feel like writing the whole recipe out just give me the ingredient list, I already know what to do to assemble them. Tiny differences in amounts can make a huge difference in a loaf of bread.
From what I have read, even tiny differences in the level of moisture in your flour can make or break your bread. Especially French Bread.

Our bread maker instruction booklet suggested adding a 1/4 cup less water than called out, mixing the dough, and then adding little bits more until it is the right consistency. Then record the amount you actually used, since that can be used for the rest of that bag of flour.

Must really matter, or they wouldn't have put that in the booklet for a device marketed as an "easy start and forget" thingie.
Perfect recipe for a bread machine:

1 cup warm water
2 TBS sugar
1 1/2 tsp salt
3 TBS olive oil
3 cups King Arthur Bread Flour
1 scant TBS yeast

Handcrafted breads are more fun, but a lot more work.
The baking season is almost here! Mabon, Samhain, and Yule.
I'm kind of over it after that...
Chicken Parmesan, crispy polenta, mixed green salad (romaine, red cabbage, tomato, shredded carrots).
Bratburgers and Wickleslaw.

The last of the Scottish Shortbread for dessert.
Beef and Guinness stew, with enough cooked to do me tomorrow too!
Chicken and noodle casserole with peas and carrots-homemade biscuits and salad.
Quote:
Beef and Guinness stew

Seems like a waste of Guinness. But yall got it running out your ears so to speak.

I just got a recipe for Wacky Cake I'm gonna try. It's an old chocolate cake recipe from the depression era that uses no eggs or milk.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
Beef and Guinness stew

Seems like a waste of Guinness. But yall got it running out your ears so to speak.



yup, we aint likely to run short any time soon.
That'd be like the USA running out of Bud Light.
I wouldn't ruin a stew with Budweiser but it makes a good Beer Butt Chicken
schlack-how do you make that Guiness stew? It sounds delish!

Greger-that chicken looks so good! I had some at a camp out a few years ago. The chicken was very juicy.

My chicken and noodle casserole turned out very well, as did the biscuits. I had some plum chutney that I bought when I was back east a few weeks ago. I tried it on the biscuits, and it was so good! Mr. Scoutgal poured his chicken and noodles over his biscuits.
Walnut Molasses Pie

This is very similar to a Pecan Pie. In fact I used the Pecan Pie recipe from the dark Karo corn syrup bottle but substituted Walnuts and Molasses. I'm still working on that braided crust.
Mmmm, that pie looks yummy!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
schlack-how do you make that Guiness stew? It sounds delish!


Fry off onions and leeks - and reserve

Brown stewing beef - I usually use round steak. - you could dredge the beef in flour - I prefer a thinner sauce so I dont.

Deglaze the pan/pot with a bottle of Guinness - (dont use the stuff with the co2 widget to create the head)

Add in beef, reserved onions and leeks, carrots and baby new potatoes (or whatever stewing veg you like)

Add in beef stock. (this time round I used some frozen leftover gravy from a Striploin roast i did a few weeks back)

Add tomato puree - not too much,

Add a dash Worstershire sauce, herbs (thyme and marjoram in this instance) salt and pepper. After tasting i added a small splash of vinegar to give the sauce another note.

Simmer on a low heat for 2-3 hours.

Put in fridge overnight, reheat and eat the next day. It needs the overnight to mature. I will be eating the rest of it tonight and it should be even better!
Tonights delight will be my own version of Chicken Tikka Masala - with the remains of last nights tandoori chicken.

Chicken tikka
Tinned Tomato
Onion
garlic
Spices - garam masala, cumin, ferungeek, Chilli powder - and whatever takes my fancy
Coconut milk
lemon juice
Cilantro for garnish

Served with boiled rice and mint yoghurt.

Take that Monday

Originally Posted By: Schlack
Tonights delight will be my own version of Chicken Tikka Masala

Originally Posted By: Schlack
Fry off onions and leeks - and reserve

Chef Schlacky ThumbsUp

Originally Posted By: Greger

I'm still working on that braided crust.

We see that. wink
You can't stretch the braids or they shrink.
I'll have it perfected by Christmas.

Tonight I'm going out for crab legs at my favorite restaurant.
King or snow?
Snow. All you can eat on Monday night.
Chicken stir-fry tonight, with steamed rice!
Hopefully it's brown rice! wink
Originally Posted By: california rick
Hopefully it's brown rice! wink


No, I can't have brown rice. It contains too much phosphorus. I use white rice.
If it's white - it ain't right! No white bread, rice, flour. nono The endosperm has been stripped away.
Still can't eat brown rice or whole grain anything. Too much phosphorus-it hurts my kidneys and depletes the bones.
Prosciutto, genoa salami, and sweet capicola, provolone and mozzarella. Marinated mushrooms, pearl mozzarella, artichoke hearts, olives, and cherry tomatoes.

Mussels in a garlic butter sauce

Eggplant Parmesan with bucatini

Ossobucco with polenta and a seared vegetable medley

Panna cotta with a spiced pear compote.
Not quite as fancy as yours Greg, but a perfect thurs evening mini feast:

Garlic bread, some leftover tomato based pasta sauce with chunky vegtables, chorizo & serano ham.
My menu is for Saturday night. Eight people. I've already started prepping and cooking though.
Chicken with mushroom risotto, and baby peas. Peach cobbler for dessert.
The diet went out the window last night for a saturday night special.

Thick cut Strip steak, home made oven chips (fries to you foreigners), caramelised onions, garlic and oregano pan gravy, and a side salad with balsamic* vinegarette.

Mrs Schlack and I went out for dinner last week, paid twice as much for a meal half as good.

*Dont use the cheapo stuff. I usually buy good quality olive oil and baslamic about once a month. its far more expensive, but well worth it.
When I cook at home, I try to use locally grown organic fresh produce and herbs. The meat I get, is raised organically without hormones and free range. It does cost a bit more, but like schlack says, it's worth it!
Quote:
home made oven chips (fries to you foreigners)

They're only fries if you fry them. I guess they can still be chips if you bake them though...@u@

The osso buco came out perfect. I've been working on this recipe for a while and it's good to finally get it perfected.
I'm looking forward to doing lamb fore shanks like this.
So how thick is your veal shank? Most of the photos I see online show something like a standard pork chop, but the only time I ever ordered osso buco in a restaurant it was about four inches of bone with all the attached meat presented with the bone oriented as if the calf was standing!

That was at a German butcher's restaurant that buys 4H and Future Farmer livestock and does their own processing. They tend to do their presentations in ways sometimes a bit unsettling to Americans! Mighty tasty, though.
Osso Bucco. Literally "Hole in the Bone" shouldn't really be much more than an inch thick. The idea is to melt the marrow from the bone during the braising. I used Beef Shanks, 1 inch thick. But I also tossed in a few oxtails and short ribs to study the effects of the braising method on several different cuts of meat.
Braised brisket will be rolling up on the menu one day too.

Veal is the only meat I refuse to eat.
Veal is made from fattened male dairy calves. If I could get veal that was humanely treated I would eat it in a heartbeat.
Tonight was my ever popular pepperoni pizza!

Bought a breadmaker to to the heavy lifting regarding the kneading.

Tomorrow night is a simple spanish omlette.

eggs, potato, onion and a little leftover chorizo.

Speaking of braising, im planning some braised steaks over the next week or so - any recipie hints? Was thinking of a simple liquid of onion, beef stock, oregano and a little flour for thickening.

Not sure what cut of beef yet - Ill have that discussion with the butcher.
One of the biggest changes I just made was covering the pan with parchment paper before sealing it tightly with foil. It seems weird but it makes a big difference.

Here's Fabio's Ossobucco recipe...


My favorite braising liquid is from Tom Valenti's Lambshanks.
You can get away with some fairly cheap fatty cuts of beef for braising. The beef shanks were incredible. Oxtails and Short ribs probably a little to fatty for Mrs. Schlack. I think Brisket is next in line for my braising pan.
Fabio used deli paper, not parchment. That's why it's a soggy mess when he takes the foil off.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Oxtails and Short ribs probably a little to fatty for Mrs. Schlack.


Ah yes, but she is away for a night in a couple of weeks, might try the beef ribs.
The whole reason for cooking osso buco was to perfect the beef rib recipe.
Its definitely winter food time!

Trying the lamb shanks this evening - as per your recipie, going to have it with crusty bread made with garlic and rosemary infused olive oil (ive waited 3 weeks to use it since I prepped the oil)

Currently have a 4 chicken carcass stock simmering for soups later in the week.

Tomorrow going to make a giant batch of Beef and Guiness stew for the freezer.

Also just bought some lovely calabrese picante and hazelnut salami for Election night Pizza.

I just looked a lamb shanks in the grocery. Kinda pricey but I think i'm gonna make it happen next month.

Oh hey! I just came up with a really easy way to get steam in the oven for more crusty bread. I have one of those porous ceramic pizza stones that pretty much lives on the bottom rack of my oven. I took it out and soaked it until it absorbed as much water as possible then put it back in when I put the bread in. I've done this a few times now and it works best when I put the loaf on a perforated pizza pan. I've got a perforated Baguette pan but I need to get a French bread pan for full size loaves.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Chicken with mushroom risotto, and baby peas. Peach cobbler for dessert.

ThumbsUp

I'll bet Mr. Scout is a very good cook! smile
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
When I cook at home...

You cook in other people's homes?!? Who does the dishes? Hmm
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Chicken with mushroom risotto, and baby peas. Peach cobbler for dessert.

ThumbsUp

I'll bet Mr. Scout is a very good cook! smile


Only if you like scrambled eggs, bacon or sausage, frozen dinners, frozen pizza, BBQ, microwaved anything and spaghetti. Oh, he can heat up a can of anything, run through the drive-thru or order over the phone, too! LOL

I do most of the real cooking, although because of my kidney disease, it's hard to stand for more than 10 minutes at a time. So I sit in a chair with a book, while I watch over the cooking. Unless I'm baking-then I wait for the timer. grin
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
When I cook at home...

You cook in other people's homes?!? Who does the dishes? Hmm


When it is a family gathering, I always help to cook and do dishes. That's the way my family was raised. Everyone helps, everyone eats. Only babies, toddlers and really old people are exempt. This only applies to family gatherings and holidays. If I am a guest in a friend's home, I follow what their traditions and practices are. If I have a non-family member, it depends on how long I've been friends with them as to what happens. It works out.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
...because of my kidney disease, it's hard to stand for more than 10 minutes at a time. So I sit in a chair with a book, while I watch over the cooking. Unless I'm baking-then I wait for the timer. grin

frown

Ask Mr. Scout to help you. smile
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
...because of my kidney disease, it's hard to stand for more than 10 minutes at a time. So I sit in a chair with a book, while I watch over the cooking. Unless I'm baking-then I wait for the timer. grin

frown

Ask Mr. Scout to help you. smile


Oh, he does, sometimes. But that is hard to do when he is refereeing at night. I mostly try and cook to have dinner by 6:30-7:00 pm, since that is the latest I want to eat. I save a plate for Mr. Scoutgal to warm up in the microwave on game nights. On days he has no games to ref, then he usually gets home around dinner time.
Chicken shishkabob on the Cobb...

I'm gonna try Cornish hens on the Cobb sometime this week.
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Chicken shishkabob on the Cobb...


That looks really yummy, Loggy! laugh
Originally Posted By: Greger

I'm gonna try Cornish hens on the Cobb sometime this week.


That sounds good, too! ThumbsUp
Butterflied, backbone removed, and marinated overnight in Frank's Hot Sauce.
Chicken Pinwheels with roasted red peppers and spinach, home made chicken stock polenta with garlic and onion, Sage and Marjoram gravy.

Poached the chicken, although next time I will pan fry.

Tried 3 butchers today to get some pork shoulder for Carnitas - no joy, so steak fajitas it is then for tomorrow.
No pork shoulder? That's crazy. There's always huge piles of them here and it's about the cheapest cut of meat you can buy.
When you say "shoulder" I assume you're talking about the "Boston Butt". I've been having fun doing really long slow cooks with the "Picnic". Sometimes with the skin on cut into a diamond pattern with a lot of dry rub, and sometimes peeled and wrapped in bacon. This was the last one I did...

Here's a picture of the pig with the primal cuts marked for reference...
Schlack, Here's a link that might help you with those chicken pinwheels. If you already have this particular skill dialed just ignore this.
Greger~That bacon wrapped pork roast looks delicious! ThumbsUp
Bacon wrapped anything is delicious: scallops, water chestnuts, tenderloin
Originally Posted By: california rick
Bacon wrapped anything is delicious: scallops, water chestnuts, tenderloin


Bacon-wrapped asparagus, roasted in the oven! ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: Greger
Schlack, Here's a link that might help you with those chicken pinwheels. If you already have this particular skill dialed just ignore this.


made a decent fist of it but not perfect. will perfect the technique. poached the chicken and was a little bland. will fry next time.

cooked up a big batch of pasta/pizza sauce today, marinaded tandori chicken and have pastrami seasoning in fridge. all set for the week!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: california rick
Bacon wrapped anything is delicious: scallops, water chestnuts, tenderloin


Bacon-wrapped asparagus, roasted in the oven! ThumbsUp

use parma ham instead! lovely
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: california rick
Bacon wrapped anything is delicious: scallops, water chestnuts, tenderloin


Bacon-wrapped asparagus, roasted in the oven! ThumbsUp

use parma ham instead! lovely


That does sound lovely! I'm going to try that for my Christmas party. Thanks for a great idea. ThumbsUp
I gallantly asked my wife for a productive and necessary task in preparing for the big feed this afternoon and was directed to french cut a bunch of green beans. I was told that it could be done in front of the teevee while watching football, which excited me a good deal... until I remembered that I don't watch football. But I did scare up the Sabata series at about 1/3 into the second one. Love that Lee Van Cleef! The third one is on now, with Sabata transformed into Yul Brynner (I keep expecting him to go all Egyptian on me). Not really watching so much, got started on the Mimosas - hark! Is that Western whistling I hear in Italian?
Quote:
french cut a bunch of green beans

So you'll be having haricot verts la franaise? @L@
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
french cut a bunch of green beans

So you'll be having haricot verts la franaise?@L@

Not sure... I got a haircut two weeks ago. Hmm

Is the Flowbee made in France?
My sisters and I (there are four of us altogether) have been in an argument about what are the best potatoes to use for mashed potatoes. @ of us prefer the red rose potatoes, with the skins. One sister likes the russet, and one sister likes Yukon gold potatoes. I like the red rose potatoes, because they are better for diabetics, and with the red skins, they look very festive. I also add mashed turnips or rutabagas to my mash, and I use real butter and a bit of cream or half and half. One of my sisters adds garlic and sour cream to her mashed potatoes, too.
Quote:
Not sure... I got a haircut two weeks ago. Hmm


ROTFMOL ROTFMOL
This in the news today...
Avoid these Mashed Potato mistakes
They say a mix of Russets and Yukon Gold, some waxy potatoes, some starchy.

I like to add Rutabaga too, Scout, gives them a rich buttery flavor. You need to boil the Rutabagas separately though because the cooking time is not the same as potatoes.\

I just had a nice bowl of radishes for lunch, with pink Himalayan salt. Stir fried mixed greens and haricot verts for dinner. I had turkey yesterday.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
french cut a bunch of green beans

So you'll be having haricot verts la franaise? @L@

Hey! I looked it up, sounds yummy, if that's not the plan I guess I got some lobbying to do. Maybe git a coupla more Mimosas in her...
Quote:
Flowbee

Hey I looked it up, sounds better than the dull scissors I use to hack my hair out of my eyes.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
Flowbee

Hey I looked it up, sounds better than the dull scissors I use to hack my hair out of my eyes.

Things are lookin' up! ThumbsUp

Guests arrived - the wife's brother Dr. Dan from Oregon and niece Mia. I got a present - a bottle of Temperance Trader straight bourbon whiskey, batch no. 1, bottle no. 577. The distillery is a coupla blocks from his house. We'll taste that later this evening.

Just got off KP, peeling spuds for mashed potatoes. We're frikkin' steaming those taters, never heard o' that before. Got a line on free range heritage breed turkeys, that's going to be the standard from now on. They got ducks, too, if I can convince my chef to give'm a go.
Six Mimosas in and I got my way, excepts I'm the one who had to actually haircut the verts. Better be worth it, man.
Beans was good, so was the taters. Turkey got a brine soak, it was good and juicy. "Burp"
I was gonna go vegetarian for dinner, but I decided to Hell with it and had a couple of quarter pound chili dogs.
Then I had a nap.
Went to mom's retirement home for dinner in their dining room. I had shrimp cocktail to start, then baked salmon, green bean casserole, candied sweet potatoes, and mashed potatoes with gravy. Others at our table had roast turkey or ham. Champagne, sparkling cider, and egg nog to drink. Pecan pie for dessert.

Pretty nice place! Only problem was we had to leave her apartment for our seating with <1 minute left in the football game, and it was tied 31 to 31.

The destination is never so important as the journey.
But I hope things turned out in your favor.
I had Thanksgiving dinner in a restaurant in Los Angeles. Because of my FIL's operation we had out of town relatives. It was our first holiday meal in 21 years. The food(roast turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, salad, soup, green beans and julienned carrots) was pretty good, and I had bread pudding for dessert. That was excellent! But I still like the home cooking best. And there are no leftovers. frown
>no leftovers...

You could go buy a small turkey tomorrow, and just cook it for the fridge. I bet you could find a real deal. A loaf or two of bread (I like sourdough), some mayo, lettuce, and tomatoes, and you would be set for several days worth of turkey sandwiches.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
>no leftovers...

You could go buy a small turkey tomorrow, and just cook it for the fridge. I bet you could find a real deal. A loaf or two of bread (I like sourdough), some mayo, lettuce, and tomatoes, and you would be set for several days worth of turkey sandwiches.


And my grocery store deli has smoked turkey already sliced for sandwiches. Good idea! And I can make some stuffing, too. ThumbsUp
Did the usual. Except I cooked the smallest T-bird for me, ever - 10.5# Free-range, tough drumstick.

Tried something new with the mashed 'taters which turned out really well: 2/3 red pots + 1/3 parsnip

I usually do celery root puree with white truffle oil in lieu of mashed pots - tired of doing celery root puree - way, way, too much effort - the red pot/parsnip was way easier. Hmm

Quote:
you would be set for several days worth of turkey sandwiches.

Sounds like turkey purgatory to me. I wont turn my nose up at it but I'm not really a fan of turkey and find the thought of eating it for a week to be very unappetizing.
Any poultry is good right out of the oven, but once it cools it's dogfood around here.
The next project when Mrs Schlack is away - Lamb Bacon

oh yes

Went out for an India meal with some friends last night and had something amazing.

Chicken Kolhapuri:

Tandoori marinated chicken pieces cooked with tamarind & cashew nuts in a tomato based gravy to give a slight sweet & sour flavour.

i did have a few beers on me, and that always improves food no end, but this stuff was great. I dont think i will even try to recreate it myself.
I think you got us on the Lamb Bacon. Pork belly is damn hard to find and I think lamb belly would be impossible.

Some years back I got to be a fair Indian cook. The seasonings are completely different from what we're used to and are used in amounts that are mind boggling to Westerners.

Then I was trained to cook Thai food, a whole different set of spices and techniques. I never went back to Indian cuisine. Tandoors are prohibitively expensive and without one you'll never achieve real authenticity. Woks, on the other hand, are dirt cheap.
There is an Indian/Pakistani restaurant near by, and they make a coconut chicken curry that is to die for! I have it with basmati rice and some pineapple cooked with the rice. Just add some garlic naan and that cucumber yogurt sauce and you are all set! Plus, some golab jamb for dessert!
Just had a lovely salad with a mixture of iceberg, dandelion, leaf spinach and fresh kale and tomatoes followed by a mess of Beef Lumpias, which are Filipino style egg rolls, definitely a light dinner, followed by Miss Karen's delightful pecan pie, which is not light in any sense of the word, but sinfully rich and toothsome.

Tomorrow is Piroghi night. I'm sure the kids will "Ewwwww" and turn up their noses. Good...ore for me and Miss Karen!

More salad next to those Eastern European goodies.
We're on a salad kick right now :-)
Of course I could have just been a smartass and said:

Check my new sig line, it's what's for dinner!
(Say it in the Ralphie Wiggum voice for max effect)
I like Lumpia, but I really love fried wonton. I'll be having lots of that on Christmas Eve!
Quote:
Lumpia

Seriously Scout. That sounds just wrong.

Can you enlighten us?
I love anything fried.

Jeff, if you fry those piroghis and serve 'em with ketchup the kids will love 'em...

Love the new sig line!
Never mind--I read further. My bad and failing memory: greger have you had Bagong?

You comma my house- you eat Bagong
Das de pillipino style
Bumbay your estomeek a feel
like a someteeg wrong

Das de pillipino style
!

That--was a song BTW that was played on the radio time and again when I was a kid. Does that make it right?
Near as I can tell Bagoong is fermented Philipino fish paste.

I have Thai fish sauce and Italian anchovy paste in the kitchen and use them often but Bagong....No.
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
Lumpia

Seriously Scout. That sounds just wrong.

Can you enlighten us?


Lumpia is the Filipino equivalent to Chinese fried wonton. It is rolled in a cylinder and fried. The usual filling is ground pork mixed with vegetables. It is served with different dipping sauces.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan


I am not a fan of mac and cheese, but if I had to, I'd pick Giada's version.
I like it once in awhile. I'll eventually try both recipes in the video. Usually, I just follow the directions on a box of Mueller's elbow macaroni for mac and cheese (the original recipe, not the one that uses velveta "cheese"). However, I use Cabot's Hunter's cheese (extra sharp white cheddar)and drain, rinse, and add a can of large butter beans, some diced jalapenos, and sometimes some diced ham. It has a "kick" and I like it better than the more bland versions. For those that don't like the jalapenos, just bake the mac & cheese without them and let those that wish add them afterwards (although it tastes better if included during baking).
That sounds like a great casserole, Joe, and legumes are a good thing and should be consumed as often as possible.
I almost never make mac and cheese. Mostly 'cause I don't eat pasta much. I don't hate it or anything, it's just a white starch I can get along without mostly. I actually love mac and cheese as a side dish but it's kind of a lot of trouble to make.
Manufacturers make whole-grain pastas now. smile
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I am not a fan of mac and cheese, but if I had to, I'd pick Giada's version.

I love mac & cheese - by Stouffers. I'll try this recipe. Giada is da cookin' bomb!! ThumbsUp

(I'm partial to Ina Garten's recipes, however.)
Originally Posted By: Greger
That sounds like a great casserole, Joe, and legumes are a good thing and should be consumed as often as possible.
I almost never make mac and cheese. Mostly 'cause I don't eat pasta much. I don't hate it or anything, it's just a white starch I can get along without mostly. I actually love mac and cheese as a side dish but it's kind of a lot of trouble to make.
I don't eat mac and cheese often, but I like it once in awhile. Boiling water is a lot of trouble if you think that boiling water is a lot of trouble. I find mac and cheese easy to prepare and bake in about an hour or so, and it makes a light lunch or dinner (moderate servings). I eat pasta about once or twice a week. I love it. I suppose if you're diabetic that you should forgo it, but I've seen diabetics enjoy it without any problems. Remember a few years ago (or was it decades?)that eggs suddenly were bad and would kill you? Suddenly all the hypochondriacs either stopped eating eggs all together or just egg whites. Really. People have been eating eggs for thousands of years, and all of a sudden they became a problem. Maybe eating a dozen or two per day with a pound of bacon will present some health challenges, but I doubt that an egg or two once in awhile present any risk for a normal healthy person. Hey, and remember when butter was also ostracized as hazardous to your health and you should have immediately switched to margarine? I never did, nor did anyone in my family. Now they're saying that margarine is bad for you, and you should use butter. Go figure. At any rate, pasta is one white starch that I enjoy.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Manufacturers make whole-grain pastas now. smile
There are some tasty dishes that call for whole-grain pasta, but I prefer the white starch variety. The issue reminds me of the green tea vs. black tea. I'll drink green tea, but, if I want to enjoy a cup of tea, I have a cup of black tea- preferably Earl Grey.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I am not a fan of mac and cheese, but if I had to, I'd pick Giada's version.

I love mac & cheese - by Stouffers. I'll try this recipe. Giada is da cookin' bomb!! ThumbsUp

(I'm partial to Ina Garten's recipes, however.)


I like The barefoot Contessa's recipes as well. But Giada's are a bit more on the healthy side. Plus I love to hear her say things in Italian!
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: california rick
Manufacturers make whole-grain pastas now. smile
There are some tasty dishes that call for whole-grain pasta, but I prefer the white starch variety. The issue reminds me of the green tea vs. black tea. I'll drink green tea, but, if I want to enjoy a cup of tea, I have a cup of black tea- preferably Earl Grey.


I do not like the taste of whole grain pasta. I like almost any kind of tea, hot or iced. I was the only kid in the family that didn't like mac and cheese. I also wouldn't eat tuna fish as a kid. Funny, but I like tuna salad now-a lot-with diced celery onion and dill pickles.
'
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Remember a few years ago (or was it decades?)that eggs suddenly were bad and would kill you? Suddenly all the hypochondriacs either stopped eating eggs all together or just egg whites. Really. People have been eating eggs for thousands of years, and all of a sudden they became a problem. Maybe eating a dozen or two per day with a pound of bacon will present some health challenges, but I doubt that an egg or two once in awhile present any risk for a normal healthy person. Hey, and remember when butter was also ostracized as hazardous to your health and you should have immediately switched to margarine? I never did, nor did anyone in my family. Now they're saying that margarine is bad for you, and you should use butter. Go figure. At any rate, pasta is one white starch that I enjoy.

I tend to avoid sugars and other carbohydrates, along with some fats, as garbage calories -- but I don't make a religion of it.
In my moderately long lifetime, I have seen all too many food fads come and go, and all too many "authoritative" pronoucements by the "experts" disproven or rendered questionable.
My normal state of scepticism applies to almost all food dogmas, as it does to all the rest of life.

My strong suspicion is that heredity and personal physiology and conditions of exercise are what makes food good or bad for you.

"One man's meat is another man's poison."

However, in most cases, I think being abstemious is good for most people, most of the time.
After all,

"You dig your grave with your teeth." grin
I abstain from food. It's boring... cool
My grave will be thirty feet deep.
Indeed. Today it seems that around 82.3% of the Eugene residents have decided they are allergic to gluten. The allergy du jour in our neck.

If one is predisposed to that precondition one can find gluten free anything here. Which reminds me of a clip I recently saw from the satire program Portlandia in which a Allergy Pride Parade LOL was slated for the day.

Then I envision some starving children somewhere refusing to eat a piece of freshly baked crusty bread because it happened to contain wheat.
Funny, because bread is the one thing that almost all cultures have.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: california rick
Manufacturers make whole-grain pastas now. smile
There are some tasty dishes that call for whole-grain pasta, but I prefer the white starch variety. The issue reminds me of the green tea vs. black tea. I'll drink green tea, but, if I want to enjoy a cup of tea, I have a cup of black tea- preferably Earl Grey.


I do not like the taste of whole grain pasta. I like almost any kind of tea, hot or iced. I was the only kid in the family that didn't like mac and cheese. I also wouldn't eat tuna fish as a kid. Funny, but I like tuna salad now-a lot-with diced celery onion and dill pickles.
Your tastes change as you get older.
Originally Posted By: numan

My strong suspicion is that heredity and personal physiology and conditions of exercise are what makes food good or bad for you.

ThumbsUp


Originally Posted By: numan
However, in most cases, I think being abstemious is good for most people, most of the time.
After all,

"You dig your grave with your teeth." grin
ThumbsUp
I totally agree with your above dietary pearls of wisdom, and wish to throw in one more: If you don't get a "lift" from what you eat in that it makes you feel better, naturally invigorated and revitalized, or, conversely, saps your energy or makes you feel lethargic, then you're eating the wrong stuff.
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Indeed. Today it seems that around 82.3% of the Eugene residents have decided they are allergic to gluten. The allergy du jour in our neck.

If one is predisposed to that precondition one can find gluten free anything here. Which reminds me of a clip I recently saw from the satire program Portlandia in which a Allergy Pride Parade LOL was slated for the day.

Then I envision some starving children somewhere refusing to eat a piece of freshly baked crusty bread because it happened to contain wheat.
ROTFMOL
Quote:
Funny, because bread is the one thing that almost all cultures have.

Precisely. Has not the gluten free mania presented itself in SoCal?
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Indeed. Today it seems that around 82.3% of the Eugene residents have decided they are allergic to gluten. The allergy du jour in our neck.
There also always seems to be a diet du jour. A number of years ago a friend lost about 25 lbs and looked a lot better. Some people can carry a few extra pounds and still look good and some can't. He was in the latter category. At any rate, all the diet du jour crazies kept pestering him for his "secret." What kind of diet? What kind of diet did you use? He said that he ate the "eat less diet." No one wanted to hear that.
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
Quote:
Funny, because bread is the one thing that almost all cultures have.

Precisely. Has not the gluten free mania presented itself in SoCal?


Oh yes-but it is fighting against the new "artisan bread" craze. wink
My diet book reads: Eat less-exercise more.

Think that could be a best seller Joe?
No. I'm a firm believer in that you've got to sweat. Sweat more and eat less is not only healthy, but a good way to maintain a normal weight or to lose weight. A lot of people don't want to hear that.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Oh yes-but it is fighting against the new "artisan bread" craze. wink

New? How quaint for you SoCal.

We've been diving into Potato Herb, and Walnut Lavain for 30 years here. Challah! coffee
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
My diet book reads: Eat less-exercise more.

Think that could be a best seller Joe?



Although these pages have shown I have eaten well in terms of nice food, I have lost 2 stone this year - Mrs Schlack too ( smaller portions, cutting out all incidental eating, using the frying pan a lot less and sadly no butter). Beer was except from the diet but, i would only usually drink once a week anyway. The key here for me has been consistent discipline. The battle against flab is won in the store, not in the kitchen. Dont bring the sh*te into your house.


Exercise is not all that helpful in losing weight as far as calorie burning goes. 15 mins on the exercise bike burns 70 calories. Dont think you can burn off a burger with a walk, however more exercise does train the body to use nutrients more efficently.
Congratulations! The eat less diet triumphs once again! Here in the states there are some people that pay extra for third rate processed diet food instead of simply just reducing their portions.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Oh yes-but it is fighting against the new "artisan bread" craze. wink

New? How quaint for you SoCal.

We've been diving into Potato Herb, and Walnut Lavain for 30 years here. Challah! coffee


We have had artisan breads here for decades, rick. They are just more in vogue lately. My mother used to buy potato herb bread from our local Jewish bakery. Challah, brioche, sour dough, all kinds of rye bread and even Italian and french breads. I loved going into that bakery in the morning, when you could smell all that fresh bread. You really have to get off the "NoCal is Better than SoCal" meme. It is getting very tedious. coffee There is wonder and beauty everywhere in this world, and if you cannot see that, then you are mentally stunted and blind. I feel sorry that you are so limited.
I know it's a bit off-topic for this thread, but I just had Rubio's finger-lobster tacos for lunch: Damn, those are good!

My apologies to anyone out of range of a Rubio's.
There is a Rubio's not far from me. But I don't do shellfish. But their Mexican food is pretty good for a chain fast food joint.
Finger lobster tacos sound pretty good. I almost had fish tacos for supper but decided on a regular sandwich instead.

I just ordered a Banneton Brotform bread proofing basket. I'm going to give the no knead bread a try finally and there are a few tools I'd like to have to step up the breadmaking a notch.
A Danish dough whisk, the proofing basket, and a pair of welding gloves. No knead bread cooks at a ridiculously high temp in a dutch oven and I don't wanna hurt myself.


The claim that a 4 year old can do this is not exactly true.
I wouldn't trust a small child to handle a 500 degree cast iron Dutch oven.

The crumb structure is what sold me on this, it's very similar to Ciabata bread. which is a major pain in the ass to make.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
My apologies to anyone out of range of a Rubio's.

Ate there once. Gawd awful. Chipotle is much better and is Baja Fresh.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
You really have to get off the "NoCal is Better than SoCal" meme.

...but we are Blanche. wink
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
There is wonder and beauty everywhere in this world...

True - expect, concrete-laden, hills stripped of vegetation in favor of homes, SoCal. No flowing rivers, no real acres of green space, nothing but shades of gray and brown space.

Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
...and if you cannot see that, then you are mentally stunted and blind. I feel sorry that you are so limited.

Rose-colored glasses don't lens my view of SoCal. Sorry.
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
There is wonder and beauty everywhere in this world...

True - expect, concrete-laden, hills stripped of vegetation in favor of homes, SoCal. No flowing rivers, no real acres of green space, nothing but shades of gray and brown space.

Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
...and if you cannot see that, then you are mentally stunted and blind. I feel sorry that you are so limited.

Rose-colored glasses don't lens my view of SoCal. Sorry.


Whatever Rick. If you need to run down others and other places to make yourself feel important, then by all means, go at it. coffee
Thanks!! ThumbsUp I've so wanted your permission. smile
The hills which are stripped of vegetation forces me (against my better judgment) to reenter this for a moment.

Rick, before Colonel Mulholland set his plans in motion which ultimately led to the watering of El Pueblo de Los Angeles, those hills were rather sparse to begin with.

That's because the area is a desert, capiche?
And the reason why so many of those hills are stripped of vegetation which wouldn't normally be there in the first place, is because if it's allowed to grow unchecked, it tends to catch fire.

That's because we don't normally get the amount of rainfall that you guys get. Now, I appreciate the fact that you don't think humans should even live here at all, period.
I just wonder where you think they SHOULD live.
After all, it's rather obvious from your Numan-like elitist screeds that those humans cretins would NEVER EVER be welcome in "The City" or anywhere Up North.

But face it, they have to live somewhere, this is where they happen to be, and they seem to prefer not being burned up in a fire every year, and those fires seem to happen anyway, but if we didn't denude those hillsides the fires would happen even more often than they do now.

I guess we're looking at a brand new Northern California version of The Georgia Guidestones, authored by Rick, in which it is recommended that we trigger a mass die-off so that Rick won't be inconvenienced by the knowledge that human beings live South of San Luis Obispo.

The bread sequence begins at 2:51.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan

The bread sequence begins at 2:51.


Excellent!
Amazing isn't it? The French bread looks good, too.
Quote:
[Rubio's] Gawd awful. Chipotle is much better and [so]is Baja Fresh.

Both of those are good and use quality ingredients, but neither one of them actually makes Mexican food as far as I have found: A good Mexican restaurant has to make their own tamales and chile rellenos. I don't even think Chipotle HAS a deep fryer in any of their locations. And I know Baja Fresh makes kosher "refried beans" that are never fried (which is an oxymoron).

I eat two things at Rubio's: Fish tacos and lobster tacos. Their non-seafood stuff is nowhere near as good as my corner taco shop.
I braised a small pork sirloin tip roast the other night. Browned it well on all surfaces in olive+canola oil. Then put it in the crock pot with a few cups of water and some seasonings. Cooked it on high setting for 2.5 hours. The results were interesting because I had an identical dry roast pork sirloin to compare it to.

The dry roast was a tiny bit tougher (though this is essentially pork loin and quite tender no matter what), and had a much larger grain structure. It would sometimes crumble when I tried to slice it thinner than 1/4".

The braised roast had an indetectable grain structure and very dense surface appearance. I could slice it so thin I could see light through the slices. Much more moist and very uniform throughout.

I think more experiments are in order. In particular, I think the fluid use for braising could be designed to carry more flavor into the meat. I will try it with a tougher beef cut, since braising is supposed to make stuff very tender.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Amazing isn't it? The French bread looks good, too.


Yes it does, and so does the croissant! ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
[Rubio's] Gawd awful. Chipotle is much better and [so]is Baja Fresh.

Both of those are good and use quality ingredients, but neither one of them actually makes Mexican food as far as I have found: A good Mexican restaurant has to make their own tamales and chile rellenos. I don't even think Chipotle HAS a deep fryer in any of their locations. And I know Baja Fresh makes kosher "refried beans" that are never fried (which is an oxymoron).

I eat two things at Rubio's: Fish tacos and lobster tacos. Their non-seafood stuff is nowhere near as good as my corner taco shop.


As I said before-Rubio's, Chipotle and Baja Fresh are pretty good for chain fastfood restaurants. But they will never beat the Mom and Pop place that I grew up with in Hacienda Heights.. It's called "Casa de Tacos, and everything in there is made from scratch with fresh ingredients. They have wonderful tamales and chili rellanos, plus chimichangas and the best guacamole!
Roasted some Brocolli with onion, bacon, garlic and balsamic vinegarette. Crispy roast taters and topped with a poached egg.

I would have eaten a bucket of it.
Quote:
topped with a poached egg


No spam? Just kidding, though that made me think of a favorite of the Hawaiian locals: Loco Moco is a beef patty on white rice with lots of brown gravy, topped with a fried egg.

That's something I can often whip together in a few minutes, since I usually have a supply of grilled beef patties in the freezer, my wife (from Maui) makes rice all the time, and I keep a supply of beef base in the fridge for quick gravy. I thicken with rice flour since she is avoiding wheat these days.

I've been cooking green beans with bacon and onions lately. I'll have to try that with brocolli, my other favorite green vegetable.
PIA--Check out a few osso buco or braised lambshank recipes for some nice braising liquids. Some cuts of meat are better suited for braising than others and, like slow roasting, a certain amount of internal fat is helpful. Very lean meat doesn't braise well. You'll also get better results in the oven.
Short ribs, beef shank, veal shank, lamb shank, pork shank if you can find it are probably the best choices for braising, but if you want to turn a fairly inexpensive cut into something special, a seven bone roast or other chuck roast would be perfect.
A braised brisket would be wonderful too but those are pretty pricey.
I'm thinking about braising corned beef next time I buy one.

I use a standard 6 inch deep half size steamtable pan for braising. The meat should be dredged in flour and browned in a heavy Dutch oven. Some of the flour should be stuck to the bottom when you are done. Deglaze the pan with wine, add a little olive oil and cook trinity or mirepoix (I prefer mirepoix) until tender, ad some tomato paste, stock, seasonings, bring it to a boil and pour it over the meat in the braising pan. Cover the braising pan first with parchment paper then seal it with foil. Put it in a 325 degree oven for two hours.
Carnitas, guac, pico de gallo, galic sauce and freshly cooked tortillas.
Quote:
trinity (=celery, onions, and bell pepper)

I never heard of that, I suppose since I have never taken any cooking classes or even read much about regional cuisine.

But when I looked it up I was amused: I season all sorts of things with celery salt, I am always chopping up onions to add to stuff, and I always have a container of powdered California, New Mexico, or Pasilla chili pepper on hand for adding some flavor to just about anything.

My wife is the big carrot fan: She buys 10 pound bags that fill up an entire crisper drawer in the fridge. I'll give the mirepoix (= celery, onions, and carrots) a try. Thanks for the info.
Tried my hand at chopped brocolli with pre-cooked potatoes, onion, bacon, garlic. Seasoned with ground rosemary, salt, and black pepper. Sauteed them in a little olive oil and then stirred in a bit of beef stock to coat everything when it was done.

OMG!
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Tried my hand at chopped brocolli with pre-cooked potatoes, onion, bacon, garlic. Seasoned with ground rosemary, salt, and black pepper. Sauteed them in a little olive oil and then stirred in a bit of beef stock to coat everything when it was done.

OMG!


That sounds yummy! ThumbsUp
I've got a soup simmering with mustard greens, napa cabbage, and green beans from the garden, carrots, onion, and portabello mushrooms from the fridge. When it's done I'll make a roux to thicken it and add some heavy cream to make it a glorified cream of mushroom soup.
'

Oh, Greger, you are an inspiration to us all !!!!
'
I am such a culinary barbarian, I didn't even know what a "roux" was :

How To Make Roux

Like Molire's Bourgeois Gentleman, who was amazed that he had been speaking "prose" all his life without knowing it, I discovered that all my life, when I started to make gravy, I had been making this very classy French confection !! wink
Oh dear! I didn't mean to make you Google! ^L^

What if you had to deglaze the pan before you made the sauce? O.O
I always use wine for that.
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Carnitas, guac, pico de gallo, galic sauce and freshly cooked tortillas.


Is Gaelic sauce good with Mexican food? LOL

rolleyes I'm sorry...

You make your own tortillas????
**Jealous**
Don't waste time being jealous: Just pick up a bag of Quaker Masa Harina next time you pass the Mexican section of a grocery store. Dirt cheap! Here's the recipe for corn tortillas:

Any amount of masa
Water as needed to make it the consistency of smooth, soft clay

You can roll the tortillas out between wax paper, or if you are one of those OCD-types you can get a tortilla press. For the real thing, just pat them out with your hands, rotating each hand about 90 deg each pat. (Left thumb against right index finger, then left index finger against right thumb, repeat.) If this doesn't come naturally, just ask any Mexican on earth to show you how. Each one takes about 20 seconds.

Bake each until golden brown on a hot grill, frying pan, or whatever. (most authentic: cook then on a piece of scrap steel plate over hot wood coals) One flip and do the other side. Once you get it down, you can easily pat out the second batch while cooking the first, etc.

Apply a little butter and salt: Yum!
Yo mean making tortillas isn't rocket science?
I wonder why the Hell I've never done it.
I guess because the premade ones are so cheap and convenient?
Now i feel like a dumbass.

I use tortillas a lot. Both flour and corn. With last nights soup I made a quesodillo. I try not to buy many chips or crisps but when I want something crunchy I cut a few tortillas into wedges and fry them up. Add a little Himalayan pink salt and they're better than anything you can get in the store. Lavash and pita bread work great for this too.
Ever try a hotdog chimichanga? Fish tacos! Enchiladas! Huevos Rancheros! Field tacos!

It looks like flour tortillas are a little more difficult but I render my own lard and always have it on hand so I'll be giving that a try soon too.
Oh and if they keep messing with the weather and the corn the price of corn flour is sure to go up. Chicken feed has already gone way up in price and there's almost no corn in it anymore, mostly wheat and milo.

I wonder if a fella got a grain mill he could make flour outa chicken feed...? It's considered expensive at $14 for 50 lbs.
Roast chicken last night, made the best gravy ever. Although I still had some chicken stock in the freezer, decided to go with the trivet method.

sat the chicken on a trivet of red onion and carrot for roasting. Garlic and Thyme in the cavity.

While the meat was resting skimmed the fat off the juices, boiled juice up including veg and garlic, strained and thickened.
Anyone ever have shakshuka?

Eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce

1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 medium brown or white onion, peeled and diced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 medium green or red bell pepper, chopped
4 cups ripe diced tomatoes, or 2 cans (14 oz. each) diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
1 tsp chili powder (mild)
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp paprika
Pinch of cayenne pepper (or more to taste-- spicy!)
Pinch of sugar (optional, to taste)
Salt and pepper to taste
5-6 eggs
1/2 tbsp fresh chopped parsley (optional, for garnish)

Planning this for Christmas brunch.
To hell with Xmass, I'm having shakshuka for breakfast in the morning!
I've been making inside out omelets lately by burnng off diced tomatoes in olive oil then pouring my egg mixture over the tomatoes and adding cheese. When I turn the omelet over its studded with the diced tomato and filled with cheese.

Tonight I went out for sushi. Had a tuna roll and an eel roll with crispy fried salmon skin, and several Kirin beers.
Yesterday, I slow cooked a flank steak with some Mexican oregano, onion, garlic and some ancho chiles. I shredded it, and put it on a warm flour tortilla with some cheeses and diced tomatoes.
As I type this I'm eating Shakshuka and toasted Pita Bread.
This is going on the permanent menu at Chez Mark's Kitchen.
After sauteing the onion and garlic I added a can of tinned diced tomatoes and spices then let most of the liquid burn off over moderately high heat before adding the eggs. The eggs took a surprisingly long time to cook but it gave the tomato mixture more time to dry out. If you like your eggs well done I'd suggest covering it for the last few minutes.

When it was done the yolks were beautifully runny and the tomatoes dry enough to scoop out each egg as a single serving if you wish. I used a wok chuan to scoop them out.

Thanks, Schlack, I owe you one for this recipe!
PIA I just set a chuck roast out to thaw and in the next day or so will be braising it using Fabio Viviani's osso buco recipe.
The Apple Cake on this page caught my eye too and I just happen to have four apples that need to be used. Boom.

EVO to make a cake? Who am I to question?
Do you plan to cut that chuck roast up into shank slice-sized pieces, or just do it whole? (I don't know how well braising can reach into big hunks of meat.) Fabio's recipe looked pretty easy to me, other than the assumption that we all have a quart of demi glace already sitting in the fridge!

But that's okay. I can just make up some 4X concentrated beef stock using beef base from a bottle. Seems a bit redundant to add espagnole sauce to that, since we already have the veggies and tomato paste in the bed. Maybe just make a lot of veggies, and use half for the bed and half for the demi glace?
Last time I did it I reduced two quarts of beef broth to one quart and added a little flour and butter. This time I probably wont bother.

OH OH!!!oH!... I have all of the leftover liquid from the last time I did it frozen! I'll just use that.

So, yeah. Just use Beef stock this time and save the liquid for next time. I'd be a little careful of the salt in that concentrate if you do it 4x. If it's low sodium it's probably okay.

I wont cut it up at all. I would consider that stewing rather than braising. The heat will penetrate the whole thing and the internal fat should keep it from drying out. Properly braised meat should be very moist.(Unlike my mother's godawful pot roasts)

Another great braising liquid is described in Tom Valente's Lambshanks
I've done that recipe a bunch of times and it's fantastic.
Next time I do lambshanks I'm gonna seal 'em up and not do all that turning.

You might try the white bean puree too, tinned Cannellini beans work fine for that.
I'm not concerned about the heat penetrating: Two hours in the oven should take care of that. What I am wondering is how well the surrounding liquid penetrates, once the muscle fibers have relaxed and started soaking up liquid. That elaborate liquid concoction is there for a reason! It gets all the way into a shank sliced to be a couple of inches thick. Does it get all the way to the middle of a whole chuck roast?

I wasn't contemplating cutting the roast up into stew cubes. More like cutting it into four or six pieces.
Chuck roast is usually a flat cut.

The ones I have are a bit thicker than this.
I'm not sure about the primal cut this comes from but if you have a much thicker(longer) piece then by all means cut it into 2 inch chops. Don't cut it longways with the grain, always cut across.

The braising pan should be sealed completely with parchment paper and foil. It should balloon up slightly in the oven so that the meat is actually almost pressure cooked. I'm not completely sure what purpose the parchment paper plays, my best guess is that aluminum is reactive and the braising liquid acidic.
Quote:
my best guess is that aluminum is reactive


That's what I guessed, too. I was actually thinking of cooking it in a covered glass casserole dish, since that would be a better fit for my chuck roast. (I don't want to need a gallon of liquid for a small roast floating in the middle of a half-tray.) I have one of those white Corning Ware 8" by 10" oval by 4" deep dishes, with a clear glass cover.

Come to think of it, all of my disposable half-trays are also aluminum.

What do you think about just buying Campbell's Beef Broth in cans, which is already 2:1? Seems like a very cheap and easy shortcut. Is homemade going to be worth the effort?
Cambell's is a little salty I think. But there's no need for homemade. I use Kitchen Basics brand. If you look at Tom Velente's recipe he doesn't require demiglace. I think that's a case of Chef Show-off, because he knows we don't have the instant demiglace that he uses in his restaurant. Yes it comes in powder form. I wouldn't sweat that particular detail. Like I said just use beef stock this time then strain and save the leftover braising liquid for next time.
Hell ya, use the Corning Ware. I just measured my stainless steel half pan and the lip is about 10 1/2 x 12 3/4 it's 4 inches deep. Ya oughta get you one, they're pretty cheap and way better than those disposable things.
Like tortillas, braising aint rocket science.

I was gonna cook mine today but ran into some emergency gardening that had to be done and never got a chance to get it started. Now I got no suppers...;^;
I always use the Kitchen Basics low sodium broths when cooking. It comes in beef, chicken and vegetable. I have a Vegan friend that I'll have over for dinner. I make a root vegetable stew with the vegetable broth and it comes out very well. I serve it with a homemade flat bread that she likes. I add beans for some protein.
Shepherd's pie-I had some leftover tri tip, so I cubed it, mixed it with some carrots, onions, parsnips, peas, corn and mushrooms. I also made a brown gravy and cooked it all in my slow cooker. Then I poured it into a casserole dish, topped it with mashed potatoes, cheddar cheese and bacon pieces. I broiled until the peaks of mashed potato were nice and golden brown. Mr. Scoutgal and I had that and a mixed green salad for dinner last night.
Well, PIA, it's back to the drawing board with the chuck roast.
The braising liquid is wonderful. The meat no good at all.
Okay, that tells me that I should try cutting up my chuck roast into smaller pieces to get more of the yummy outside stuff to the inside. I know this has to work somehow: I have had oso buco and it was terrific.

I found some Swanson unsalted beef stock at my local market, so I'm going to try using that with some mirepoix and tomato paste blended in to approximate the demi glace.

I've been reading a bit about the five mother sauces, and was surprised to see that I have already been making several of them without knowing their names or place in classical French cooking. (I just knew what I liked. smile )
I feel like it's a time/temperature problem. It appears that any flavor the meat had has been transferred to the liquid rather than vice versa. The liquid is amazing!
What works for Osso Buco does not work for chuck roast.
Next time I'll use a seven bone roast, There wasn't enough internal fat in the chuck. And I'll go with a longer cook at a lower temp.
It's not as bad as my mothers pot roast but braised meat should be soft, moist and flavorful.
Three strikes against this chunk of meat, it was none of the three.
Quote:
a time/temperature problem


Some of the chuck roast recipes I have been reading talk about cooking it for 4 or 5 hours, instead of the 2 hours that Fabio used for his shank slices. The fact that it was not tender suggests that there was not enough time over 160 F to get all the connective tissue converted into collagen and then into gelatin.

I recall reading that the muscle fibers tighten up and squeeze all of the juice out in the first phase of cooking. This makes tough meat even tougher. Then as that connective tissue conversion is near done, the muscle fibers relax and uncoil. This draws liquid back into the meat. So a tough and flavorless roast, but tasty liquid, does seem consistent with the "too short" hypothesis.

If you still have most of the roast and braising liquid, you might just try putting it all back in the oven (or a crock pot) for a few more hours. Might as well experiment, since it doesn't sound like you want to eat it as is.

I believe that surrounding the meat with braising liquid keeps it from going over 212 F, as long as there is liquid left. So it is much less likely to get burned or overcooked than a dry roasting method.
Your analysis I think is correct.
Slow roasting is my specialty. I'm fairly new to braising anything but lambshanks. Fact is, I'm not much of a beef fan at all. In slow roasting the idea is to bring the meat up to the 200 degree internal temp as slowly as possible. The same should work with braising and I was kind of skeptical of the 2 hours at 325. But it works with veal shanks...

I don't think you can put it back together and start over once it's cooled. I sliced it very thin(which should have been impossible) and put the slices back in the liquid. I'll put it back in the oven for a couple of hours at 300 degrees tomorrow and eat it on mashed potatoes or an open faced sandwich.





Next time I think I'll let it cook 5-6 hours at 225.
Here is a recipe from CFI (Center For Inquiry) A sort of science place.

ever try Tiramisu? I discovered it from a recipe and challenged it because it was a coffee flavored treat. Its the best treat Ive ever had. Ice cream, coffee liqueur, these lady finger things, a cheese, and cocoa. Alcohol, coffee, cream and sugar!!


I will give it a try when I can drive again. I'm having dizzy spells caused by advanced old age. I'm having company over the weekend and will celebrate using the above recipe if the 49ers win tomorrow. If they lose, the cat will make some meatloaf.
Have the meatloaf.
Here's a very traditional Tiramisu.


Raw eggs? I'm ok with it but some folks probably aren't.
I cut my chuck roast into five pieces, so each was no more than 2" thick or wide. I browned them well in olive oil, then laid them on top of a bed of seasoned (rosemary, thyme, garlic) mirepoix (sauteed onion, celery, carrot) in my crock pot.

I heated 16 oz of Swanson unsalted beef stock with about a cup of that same seasoned mirepoix, and added a tablespoon of beef base to make it stronger. I added two tablespoons of tomato paste, and then used an immersion blender to break up the vegetable pieces.

Then I poured the mixture over the beef pieces until they were just about covered. Cooked on high setting for five hours. Meat thermometer said the center of the largest piece was just over 160 F.

Result was very tender, but a little bland. I was disappointed with the beef stock I started with: Seemed like brown water, with little beef flavor. By the time it was done, the beef with sauce was pretty good but most of the flavor was in the sauce.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Raw eggs? I'm ok with it but some folks probably aren't.

Raw eggs come pasteurized in a carton, now. smile
Grilled pork chop, 3-cheese lasagna, sauted Brussels sprouts.
Quote:
Raw eggs come pasteurized in a carton

I expect it would be difficult to separate the yolk from the white, combine the yolk with the mascarpone and make meringue with the white. The custard can be made in a bain marie but that's a little bit fussy. I trust my eggs because I know the chickens personally and gather them myself every morning.
Perhaps a safer way to do the Tiramisu for most would be to make an English style custard or pastry filling.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Here's a very traditional Tiramisu.




This will be Christmas dessert - Irish Cream Tiramasu

i do have something of a soft spot for Nigella.
Did you know that if you eat Dubliner cheese and take a sip of a gin and tonic that you get the taste of huckleberries? Hmm
I eat Dubliner cheese a lot, but I don't drink gin and tonic.

Interesting observation though...
We had our Yule feast a little bit early; my little witches came out to plant the onions this afternoon and we spent the day gardening and feasting. We began with a French onion soup made from last years onions served with crispy fried flatbread. Then a couple of hours in the garden, taking turns throwing the ball for Roscoe and his girlfriend Milka who is visiting for a couple of weeks. It's hard to concentrate on planting onions with a big slobbery dog licking your face and begging you to play.
It's amazing how quickly the onions get planted when young nimble knees and clever little hands are helping. Once I got the kids going I picked green beans, cut a couple of(already blooming)Broccoli, picked a few green tomatoes and a Japanese eggplant then went to work in the kitchen.
They got done and walked around the neighborhood, climbed the big tree out front and generally just did what kids do while I prepared a fried appetizer course and started in on a bottle of Beaujolais Nouveau.
Fried Green tomatoes, eggplant, queso frito, and duritos served with ranch dressing as a dipping sauce and for the kids a cold bottle of white zinfandel. After that it was nap time while I tidied up the kitchen and began prepping the main course.
Green Beans, Broccoli and Lambcchops served with a balsamic citrus reduction sauce.
The bread was loaf of walnut rye.
After that we exchanged gifts, cash to the one who needed cash the most, Noelle got a gen 5 Ipod Touch, several books, new and used passed between us, I got A Feast of Ice and Fire, the Game of Thrones companion cookbook. A wealth of medieval and modern cookery.
Then on to dessert. Chef Fabio Viviani's apple cake with whipped cream. Simple, elegant, delicious! I've never made a cake with extra virgin Olive oil before but who am I to argue with the chef?
We all had a cup of lychee flavored black tea with that then an hour or so of conversation and the kids took their leave.
Somewhere along in there I had slipped the white zin into the freezer to chill it and forgotten about it so as I write this I'm sipping white zin slushie from the bottle.

Blessed be!
It's Christmas Eve morning, and I am getting prep done for our big family feast. My sisters and their families are all coming over to my house tonight. We are having a veggie tray and onion dip, Cheese, sausage and crackers for appetizers, fried pork wonton, a crown roast of pork and prime rib for the main course, au gratin potatoes, green beans sauteed with mushrooms and onions, roasted butternut squash as side dishes. Banana nit bread, pumpkin and cherry pie for dessert. I am also making a trifle. I bought lady fingers for the cake part of it.

Christmas Lunch will be roast sirloin, buttered carrots with thyme, broccoli, mashed garlic potatoes, gravy. Coconut cream pie and a yule log for dessert.
Impressive. I'm doing the usual turkey, which I could have once a week and never get tired of it. No oysters or sausage in the stuffing this time; just celery and onion- with a chicken stock for flavor. And, a turkey pot pie afterwards with everything thrown in- and I do mean everything, including the cranberries.
Joe-I love the idea for your turkey pot pie! ThumbsUp
Works for me. I pickup Pillsbury or some other frozen pie crusts (2/package). Roll out one crust in a glass baking pie dish, what's left over goes in, including gravy and cranberries, place the other crust on top, and into the oven it goes. It's surprisingly tasty. People seem to enjoy it.


This is tomorrows christmas dinner.

taters roasted in duckfat
herb, onion and sausage meat stuffing ( im not stuffing the beef)
Sprouts sauteed with garlic and bacon
Roasted carrots and parsnips
Gravy

and for afters: irish cream tiramasu.
Originally Posted By: Schlack

Sweet! Porterhouse steak!
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Schlack

Sweet! Porterhouse steak!


Correction, a T-bone roast - got 3kg (6 lbs) of it in a piece.
Quote:
"What is the difference between the T-Bone and Porterhouse?". The answer is fairly simple. The Porterhouse has a tenderloin (at least more than one or two bites) and the T-Bone does not.

Source
I baked cookies from dawn til dark, rugelach, baclava, sugar cookies, spritz cookies, Scottish shortbread, snickerdoodles and white chocolate chip w/almond.
I shoulda started yesterday but it was my kid's birthday and she had her heart set on a Japanese steakhouse. But she was a trooper and helped me bake all day today.
I don't have to cook anything at all tomorrow.

Shlack that dinner sounds truly exquisite!
Did you use the sugar cookie recipe I posted for you? How did it turn out?
Perhaps it's somewhat premature, but I'm having BBQ for lunch. I'm sure that I'm doing something wrong (or illegal), but people seem to enjoy my BBQ's. I baked approximately a 4 lb loaf of rye this morning, and I pondered: "What goes good (bad English aside) with rye bread?" Hey, ham & cheese or Kielbasa. It's warming up in the environment outside, so , hey, time for BBQ'd sausage with sauerkraut, grey poupon,home baked boston beans, homemade potato salad (pimiento stuffed olives) , and a Sam Adams with some good rye bread. The gourmets, etc, and whatever, may be aghast, but, damn, it tastes good.
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!


Why Scout, how very New York ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: Ezekiel
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!


Why Scout, how very New York ThumbsUp


In 1998, I was in Manhattan, and we went to some famous NY deli. Those sandwiches were HUGE and very good. This place reminds of that one, whose name escapes me. It also reminds me of Langers Deli in Los Angeles-which is a famous landmark with delicious deli food!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: Ezekiel
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!


Why Scout, how very New York ThumbsUp


In 1998, I was in Manhattan, and we went to some famous NY deli. Those sandwiches were HUGE and very good. This place reminds of that one, whose name escapes me. It also reminds me of Langers Deli in Los Angeles-which is a famous landmark with delicious deli food!

New York's finest deli was always the 2nd Ave. Deli (used to be about 3 blocks from where I live, but now, is no longer on 2nd Ave. it has moved to mid-town because they could no longer afford the rent).
That and the Carnegie Deli (both mainstays of NY eatery).
smile
Originally Posted By: Ezekiel
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: Ezekiel
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!


Why Scout, how very New York ThumbsUp


In 1998, I was in Manhattan, and we went to some famous NY deli. Those sandwiches were HUGE and very good. This place reminds of that one, whose name escapes me. It also reminds me of Langers Deli in Los Angeles-which is a famous landmark with delicious deli food!

New York's finest deli was always the 2nd Ave. Deli (used to be about 3 blocks from where I live, but now, is no longer on 2nd Ave. it has moved to mid-town because they could no longer afford the rent).
That and the Carnegie Deli (both mainstays of NY eatery).
smile


I think we were at the Carnegie Deli.
Quote:
I think we were at the Carnegie Deli.


That was a great place. Unfortunately, now too, closed.
Pretty soon all that will be left are Frozen Yogurt places (yuuuuk!) and nail salons.
Thanks to Mr. Bloomberg.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I went to the opening of a new deli in my town. It advertises old-fashioned Jewish foods, and American classics. I had home made pastrami on fresh-baked Jewish rye bread with brown mustard and sliced dill pickles. It came with a choice of sides, and I picked the homemade potato salad and their iced tea. The whole thing came to about $8.00 after tax. It was really good!
One of my favorite deli sandwiches is a Reuben sandwich made with pastrami, instead of corned beef. I'm from a suburb of NYC (Connecticut)and most delis used pastrami instead of corned beef. Reuben sandwiches seem to be more popular with guys. I like the beef pastrami (forget the turkey pastrami imitation), sliced Swiss, lots of sauerkraut, and Russian dressing. And, of course, some Kosher Dill pickle spears. One deli that I frequented years ago had a pickle barrel and you just helped yourself. The sandwiches were awesome and original! They don't make them like that anymore.
Quote:
They don't make them like that anymore.

If you want truly exceptional food you have to make it yourself.
I do. I didn't even realize that people made Reuben sandwiches with corned beef, until my craving for one caused to find a good deli recipe. I had thought that you made them with pastrami. I bake my own seeded (caraway)deli-rye bread. I buy Claussen pickles, which are like homemade.
My favorite kraut/mustard/and pickles is Ba-Tampte brand.

Ba-Tampte means Tasty
I like to try different flavors of mustard. I prefer the stone-ground brown mustards, though.
Yesterday I bought three kinds of mustard. And I wasn't even out of mustard!
Today, because Joe brought it up, I got a pound of deli corned beef, Some Ba-Tampte new kraut and pickle spears, a loaf of seeded Jewish rye bread and a bottle of Russian dressing.

Joe, how do you bake that rye bread? My home made rye bread is "okay" but nothing special, y'know? My understanding is that Jewish rye needs to be a sourdough and I've just never gotten my act together to do sourdough bread.
I bake it on an oven stone in the oven. The deli-rye doesn't have to be a sourdough, but it does taste better to me. I also place a broiler pan on the bottom rack and add one cup water. I mix caraway seeds with the dough as well as sprinkling on top just before baking.

There were great bakeries all around us when I was young. However, they seemed to have gone the way of the machine shop on every corner. One of the bakery breads that I miss most is the hard roll with poppy seeds. They were fantastic! Nothing like the poor imitations sometimes available today. I'm not alone in that sentiment, either. When I was searching for a recipe, I came across a number of other people who grew up in the NY, NJ, CT area that also remember them from their youth and were looking for a recipe.
Originally Posted By: Greger
My favorite kraut/mustard/and pickles is Ba-Tampte brand.

Ba-Tampte means Tasty
I'll give them a try. You also might consider Claussen's sauerkraut. I'd recommend the sauerkraut in the glass jars in the refrigerated section. Claussen's pickles are as close to homemade as any that I bought.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
I like to try different flavors of mustard. I prefer the stone-ground brown mustards, though.
I like all kinds of mustard and I've tried many. Generally, for all purpose use, I prefer Grey Poupon, especially on ham and/or turkey or egg rolls. Yellow mustard is my preference (along with hotdog relish and sauerkraut)on hotdogs (Nathan's or Hebrew National). Grey Poupon also has a stone-ground brown (country stye)mustard out now.


IMO- You can't get a decent hotdog south of NJ.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Joe, how do you bake that rye bread? My home made rye bread is "okay" but nothing special, y'know? My understanding is that Jewish rye needs to be a sourdough and I've just never gotten my act together to do sourdough bread.
I make a deli-rye, and not a straight rye- i.e. I don't use straight rye, but mix it with unbleached general purpose King Arthurs flour. . As you probably know, when making a straight rye it's best to add some potato flour to keep it from crumbling. At any rate, the deli-rye works for me.
Originally Posted By: Greger
Yesterday I bought three kinds of mustard. And I wasn't even out of mustard!
Today, because Joe brought it up, I got a pound of deli corned beef, Some Ba-Tampte new kraut and pickle spears, a loaf of seeded Jewish rye bread and a bottle of Russian dressing.
This is the Russian that I use on my Reubens:
Combine the following ingredients. Makes one-half cup.
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 1/2 Tbsp ketchup
1 1/2 teaspoons prepared horseradish*
1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

*To taste. I use a little more than in the recipe.

Also, you may want to try a Reuben made with pastrami instead of the traditional corned beef.
My favorite deli memory is of a little place called Manny's in East San Diego during the 60's. They made a great corned beef sandwich, but I lived for their cole slaw. I have never found any deli or recipe to equal it.

I think they actually pickled the shredded cabbage for a short while. And there were no other additions like peppers, carrots, paprika, etc. Just cabbage and their dressing, as far as I could tell.

I was very disappointed when I discovered they were closed and the place cleaned out. shocked
I'm sure I'd love it, what's not to love about pastrami? Good deli corned beef is easier to get than good pastrami. I'll keep my eye out for some good looking pastrami though.
If you use coleslaw instead of kraut with the pastrami you've got yerself a "Rachel".
I also bought a small block of Emmentaler Swiss cheese. Kinda pricey but hands down (in my opinion) he Swissiest of all the Swiss cheeses. I bought Ken's Steakhouse brand Russian dressing. But I'll copy your recipe for future reference.
Tomorrow's lunch is gonna be one fine Reuben!

You got Publix Supermarkets up there doncha, Joe? They carry almost a full line of Ba-Tampte products. It's all refrigerated. I'd never argue with you about Claussen's being a fine pickle. But it's from Chicago and marketed by Kraft foods. Ba-Tampte is from Brooklyn and you'd swear your Jewish Bubbie made in her kitchen just for you.
I don't care for coleslaw or sauerkraut. But I love those deli dill pickle spears! Joe's right-Causen is good, and so are Vlasic. There was a place where I grew up called "Tony's Hofbrau" that sold great deli food-and they had the best potato salda. When my mom and dad would take us on picnics, we would order sandwiches and potato salad from there and a big jug of lemonade. They also had some wonderful cheesecake. There was a really nice park close by, and we would go there to eat and play. When the owner retired, they sold the place and the new people turned it into a pizzeria. Good pizza, but I miss Tony's Hofbrau!
Fresh & Easy Arugular, pesto and cherry tomato pizza. $3.99

Quite tasty and only 650kcals for the whole pizza.
Quote:
Fresh & Easy Arugular, pesto and cherry tomato pizza. $3.99

Is that a pizza place, Rick?
I like mine a little bit heartier than that, we had Stromboli with ham, Pepperoni, steak, peppers, onions and mushrooms
with a Greek salad at my favorite pizza joint tonight, Spiro's Pizza, a mom and pop place here in town with the best pizza crust anywhere.
That was a great price though. Mine ran about $20 bucks for the two of us.
Scout, I'll agree that Claussen's and Vlasik are good pickles, maybe even great pickles. But they just don't have the taste or feel of a real home made pickle. I'd even wager that a lot of folks wouldn't even like Ba-Tampte pickles because they are too fresh and too much like a real homemade pickle.

Their New Kraut might be perfect to make that coleslaw PIA remembers so fondly. If the jar of kraut outlasts the corned beef I'll give it a try.
No it's a grocery store here on the west coast. The parent company is Tesco UK, the largest grocery company in the world.

Fresh & Easy link
Nice looking store. I wish we had those, the website says the nearest one to me is in Mesa, Arizona.
I often gaze longingly at those prepared pizzas, can't bring myself to buy them though. Boboli makes a pretty good pizza crust so I grab one of those and make my own with whatever's in my fridge.
Originally Posted By: Greger
You got Publix Supermarkets up there doncha, Joe? They carry almost a full line of Ba-Tampte products. It's all refrigerated. I'd never argue with you about Claussen's being a fine pickle. But it's from Chicago and marketed by Kraft foods. Ba-Tampte is from Brooklyn and you'd swear your Jewish Bubbie made in her kitchen just for you.
No Publix nearby, but I do my pilgrimages to Publix in either Dothan or Panama City. I like shopping at Publix. They offer a lot that the local supermarkets don't carry- such as fresh mozzarella cheese, and their employees seem to enjoy working there and are helpful and not surly. Their deli section is also very good. Now that I think about it, next time I'm there I'll check to see if they have any liverwurst. I always enjoyed it on rye with mustard. You can't get liverwurst in any of the supermarkets around here.

Speaking of deli sandwiches, I was also very fond of sliced turkey breast, Swiss, coleslaw, with whatever dressing appealed to me at the time, on an onion roll, and steamed.One deli that I frequented made a Holy Mackerel- mackerel, onions, cheese, on an onion roll, which I enjoyed regularly.

Enjoy your Reuben today!
Fresh & Easy is not your typical grocery store, not even a high-end or "organic-oriented" place. Mostly they concentrate on the "easy" part by stocking a LOT of already-prepared entrees, side dishes, and entire meals.

And most of those items are portion-sized for one or two people. It would be quite easy to live on nothing but their prepared stuff, with just a microwave oven at home to heat them up or steam fresh veggies. You would not even need a fridge because you would not have any raw ingredients or leftovers.

OTOH, that would be rather like picking up all your meals to go from a restaurant. Or like 7/11 expanded their fresh sandwich rack to fill up an entire store!

Interesting to look at, but I have only bought anything there a couple of times though it is my third-closest grocery store.
ERMAGERD!!! Perpared fud?
With all those chemicals?
Rick would never eat that kind of food!
But if you can't trust the worlds largest grocery chain who can you trust...
Originally Posted By: Greger
ERMAGERD!!! Perpared fud?
With all those chemicals?
Rick would never eat that kind of food!
But if you can't trust the worlds largest grocery chain who can you trust...

Now, now...

Fresh & Easy has a commesary and they make all of the foods themselves and the foods expire within 3-4 days. No preservatives. Yes, they have organic prepared foods as well.

I really like their chicken and green curry dish. Yum! smile I just steam my own brown rice and add some steamed broccoli.

The pizza I told you about is a Fresh & Easy product too, but from the frozen section.

I think because they are the largest grocer, and world-wide, their Asian recipes are very authentic and are much better than an American company can do, IMHO.

...and Fresh & Easy's Tandori chicken is to die for!
Yes, the few items we tried at Fresh & Easy were actually pretty good, which is why I wrote that it would be easy to just live on whatever you found there instead of eating in restaurants or cooking at home. But to do that, I think you would want to go and pickup fresh items every day or every other day.

Very convenient for a single person who doesn't want to bother with cooking for one, and it also probably would keep that person from the morbid obesity so highly-associated with frequent super-sized restaurant portions!
I finally got around to making that traditional homemade Tiramisu tonight. I soaked Ladyfingers in espresso and creme de cacao. Separated four eggs, whisked sugar and mascarpone cheese into the egg yolks, whipped the whites into meringue then folded that into the egg yolk cheese mixture. Then I put three ladyfingers in each of four wineglasses, poured the egg and cheese mixture over it topped it with shaved dark chocolate and chilled it.
Totes to die for and takes only minutes.
Gregor, why don't you start selling to restaurants?

...or open an online biz. For example, you could FedEx a Tiramisu inside an Igloo container with dry ice to me, for say, a trial, to see how well the shipping worked out. wink
Originally Posted By: california rick
Gregor, why don't you start selling to restaurants?

...or open an online biz. For example, you could FedEx a Tiramisu inside an Igloo container with dry ice to me, for say, a trial, to see how well the shipping worked out. wink


LOL
Rick, I'm sure that Fresh and Easy has a wonderful Tiramisu made from scratch in their commissary!
But you'd have to forego the luxury of freshly laid raw eggs.

I may prepare the custard in a bain marie when I make it for guests because a lot of folks freak out over undercooked food these days.
Tiramisu is stupidly easy to make once you round up the ingredients. The mascarpone cheese was the hardest to source and I probably will use a substitute next time.
Originally Posted By: Greger
...Lox with capers and cream cheese...
Did you ever try nasturtium seeds as a substitute for capers? I never did a side by side taste test, but we used to use them on a regular basis and I didn't know the difference. The leaves and blossoms make a peppery addition to a salad, too.
**Googles nastutrtium seeds**

Damn! I'm thinking I need to mix these into the butterfly garden. I've got big plans for the flowers this spring, I'm going to give them a private area all to themselves this year and Nasturtiums will definitely go into the mix. I'm a big fan of Zinnias and Marigolds because they don't require any effort and my favorite flowers are Dahlias but I never get many of those.

I've got a split Cornish hen roasting with a sweet potato on the Cobb Cooker. Mequite smoked, courtesy of Logtroll!
Fresh & Easy does have a Tiramisu, and yes, I have tried it - several times. It's one of those frozen treats.

I'm not so keen on it because of ice crystals in the cheese portion of the product. That's usually indicative of thawing and refreshing. I've tried them on several occasions and have given up.

There is a bakery about eight miles from the house. Far enough to make an effort to have to go there, but close enough to make the drive worth it. They have the best Tiramisu - well, the best desserts and baked goods. Chocolate Yule Log? Heaven! smile

That was delicious!
I dunno if you've tried it yet, Loggy, but the shavings/sawdust worked great in the moat. most of the water boiled away and the tops of the shavings were blackened. Excellent smoke flavor, not too heavy.
I also had a side of onion and tomato corn meal fritters,(hushpuppies)with buffalo ranch dressing. Me and the pup fought over those. I traded him half the breast meat, all the bones, and half the sweet potato for his share.
If yoouz ever get an itch to come out west for a visit, you're welcome to say at my house. You'll be free to roam my kitchen all you want. smile
Originally Posted By: california rick
If yoouz ever get an itch to come out west for a visit, you're welcome to say at my house. You'll be free to roam my kitchen all you want. smile


Then you can come out my way and stay with me. I will buy you exotic cheeses!(Yes, it's a bribe!)
I have wood and Jeeps, come visit me!
Quote:
nasturtium seeds as a substitute for capers?


Wow, never heard of that though I have heard of throwing the flower petals in a salad. Is there any sort of processing involved, like cooking or pickling them?

I just happen to know of a few suburban canyons in San Diego where nasturtiums have gone feral. At the right times of the year, there are many thousands of them in bloom.
Loggy, he could do that on his way to SoCal! ThumbsUp
We had them direct off the plant, but I saw a pickling recipe online. I'm pretty sure the whole plant is nicely edible.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Loggy, he could do that on his way to SoCal! ThumbsUp

Whoa! We could do a RR caravan! Tour the whole frikkin' country, mebbe even get to Ireland!
Rick, there is absolutely no cooking involved in Tiramisu. Unless you heat the eggs to 165 or so in a bain marie. The best cookies to use are Stella D'oro Margherite cookies, if you can't find ladyfingers. You can make single servings like I did or layer cookies and custard in an 8x8 dish. Then chill it a few hours and you're done.
I'm soon having my Italian snowbird friend from Brooklyn to dinner and will try this out on him.
Wow! suddenly there's a hungry crowd in the kitchen... LOL

I don't travel much folks, but I'll cook for anyone who drops by!
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Loggy, he could do that on his way to SoCal! ThumbsUp

Whoa! We could do a RR caravan! Tour the whole frikkin' country, mebbe even get to Ireland!


GREAT idea! Bow
Well, how about we all come for a meal? I'll help pay for groceries.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Loggy, he could do that on his way to SoCal! ThumbsUp

Whoa! We could do a RR caravan! Tour the whole frikkin' country, mebbe even get to Ireland!
GREAT idea! Bow

Would we expect any bickering?
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Loggy, he could do that on his way to SoCal! ThumbsUp

Whoa! We could do a RR caravan! Tour the whole frikkin' country, mebbe even get to Ireland!
GREAT idea! Bow

Would we expect any bickering?


Our mouths would be too full! grin
Originally Posted By: Greger
I finally got around to making that traditional homemade Tiramisu tonight. I soaked Ladyfingers in espresso and creme de cacao. Separated four eggs, whisked sugar and mascarpone cheese into the egg yolks, whipped the whites into meringue then folded that into the egg yolk cheese mixture. Then I put three ladyfingers in each of four wineglasses, poured the egg and cheese mixture over it topped it with shaved dark chocolate and chilled it.
Totes to die for and takes only minutes.


it really is amazing! try it with Irish Cream
Quote:
try it with Irish Cream

I was gonna, but I forgot to pick up the Baily's and used the creme de cacao instead.
I used to have a fantastic Irish Cream recipe that I got from an Irish friend. I'm afraid I lost it though.
Gave my new tagine a test drive last night - excllent results.

Beef Ketkas in a spicy tomato sauce served with flat bread. oh so damn tasty.
I'm envious of my fellow brother ranters' abilities to cook a scrumptious meal. I must try harder.
Mr. Scoutgal has expanded his repertoire to box mix pancakes! He made them for me this morning, since I have just been diagnosed with pneumonia. For a packaged mix, they were pretty good, and he did a really good job-even though he was confused at first about the difference between dry and wet measures. The mix was Safeway's brand and you just add water. For a guy who thinks haute cuisine is frozen pizza and diet Pepsi, this was a big milestone! Mr. Scoutgal made major points today! ThumbsUp
Indeed. I'm glad that he's taking care of our sick scoutgal. smile
You might suggest to Mr. Scoutgal that he try chicken soup mix? There are some good dry mixes out there and you only have to add chicken. Get well and try to take it easy.
Quote:
You might suggest to Mr. Scoutgal that he try chicken soup mix?

Costco sells both dry potato soup mix and tortilla soup mix, last time I checked. Both are really pretty good, come in a big container (30 servings+), and are very easy: Just one scoop (scoop included) + a measured amount of hot water. Stir, wait a minute, enjoy.

Hope you are feeling better soon, SG.

BTW: Your husband might get a better feel for complete pancake mix if you explain that it's like dry spackle powder. You just have to add enough water to get it to the consistancy you like. The amount given on the back of the box gives one usable result, but some people like thicker or thinner pancakes. And if you add too much water, you can always make it thicker by adding a little more mix.
Thanks, guys. Mr. Scoutgal ran to the grocery store and picked up canned soup. Progresso has some very good ones. They have a chicken noodle that I like very much. But I will try those dry ones from Costco-they sound intriguing! ThumbsUp
I wouldn't go that far. I had turkey today with all the fixings! What does that mean? It means for the next 3 days: turkey pot pie; turkey sandwiches, and turkey soup with wide egg noodles and carrots. Speaking of turkey soup, the supermarket had turkey necks, so I picked up 6-7 lbs. Throw them in with the turkey carcass into a stockpot and cover with water. Boil and skim the scum off, and then add the carrot, onion (embed a few cloves), whole peppercorns, carrot, celery rib, a bay leaf or two, garlic cloves, and some parsley, then strain, and simmer (light boil) for 3 or 6 hours or whatever. Strain and refrigerate broth. Next day, skim the fat that has risen to top of soup, which at this point should be a gel. If you're into it, perhaps, (optional) a little good vermouth, and simmer to light boil. Toss in egg noodles, left over turkey (chopped) and diced carrots (or celery or onions or whatever you prefer)until done- about 6-10 minutes, depending upon your stove. Tastes quite good. Add or subtract to your taste and preferences. The turkey broth is good for about 2 days and is a tasty and can be enjoyable taken instead of tea, cocoa, or coffee.
In Chinese tradition, I make a turkey and rice soup we call "Juk". I cover the turkey carcass with water, and add salt. Then we skim the "scum" off the top. I then add celery, soy sauce, bok choy, carrot and onion to the pot with white pepper and cilantro. This makes an excellent stock. Then I pull out the bones and add rice. I like a thick Juk, but my brother in law likes a traditional broth-like soup. If you want the thicker soup use uncooked rice. For the broth-like soup, ad in already cooked rice and just heat to boiling.

But for now-I have to let Mr. Scoutgal cook what he is able to. Tonight, it's spaghetti. grin
Thanks. I do- more or less- the same thing that you do. Sometime I add rice, and sometimes I use noodles. It depends upon my guests. Personally, I like wide egg noodles. Take it easy. Pneumonia is nothing to toy with. We really don't live that long. Take it easy for a while.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
...for now-I have to let Mr. Scoutgal cook what he is able to. Tonight, it's spaghetti. grin

Beats having a bowl of Cap'n Crunch for dinner. LOL (Don't let Mr. Scoutgal has too much free-rein - you just might end up with a bowl of cold cereal for dinner. wink )
When I make soup, I put the entire uncooked bird into the stock pot, along with carrots, cerely, onions and simmer it for about 3.5 hours. I pull the bird out, skin it, and retain the meat.

I then add noodles, or puree the cooked veggies and broth with a puree stick/wand and turn it into chicken and dumplings. If I do that, I add more raw carrots and raw celery, s & p, and cook for another hour and make then make the dumplings (Bisquick + parsley) the last 20 mins.

I mound the chicken in-between two dumplings, arrange the carrots and celery sticks on top of the chicken, pour the broth over the entire meal, and viola, chicky dumps. smile
National Soup Month
Originally Posted By: california rick
When I make soup, I put the entire uncooked bird into the stock pot, along with carrots, cerely, onions and simmer it for about 3.5 hours. I pull the bird out, skin it, and retain the meat.

I then add noodles, or puree the cooked veggies and broth with a puree stick/wand and turn it into chicken and dumplings. If I do that, I add more raw carrots and raw celery, s & p, and cook for another hour and make then make the dumplings (Bisquick + parsley) the last 20 mins.

I mound the chicken in-between two dumplings, arrange the carrots and celery sticks on top of the chicken, pour the broth over the entire meal, and viola, chicky dumps. smile

Rick, I think you're makng a couple of small mistakes. First, skin the chicken before putting it in the stockpot. There's a lot of fat in the skin that will need to be removed later and it doesn't add anything to the flavor. I also prefer to cut the bird up so that the bones are able to better flavor the stock.
Second, when you remove the chicken from the stockpot, set it aside to cool and drain before de-boning and strain the stock. There is no earthly reason to leave those mushy cooked out vegetables in your soupstock. Mash them and feed them to the dog, he'll really appreciate it.
Once the stock has been strained out add fresh vegetables cut to 1/4 inch dice along with noodles, rice or barley, bring it back to the boil until they are tender. Add in the meat and serve or...
Use your immersion blender to puree the second batch of vegetables which should be sufficiently tender within a half hour. At this point I usually add some heavy cream and a dash of sherry to finish the soup.
Chicken and dumplings of course want a larger dice and I thicken the stock with a roux for those. Do you do drop dumplings or rolled dumplings?

I drop the dumplings.

I thought the fat from the skin is what flavors the stock. Yes, I skim the fat off when the stock cools.
You may be right, and far be it from me to suggest that anyone ever remove fat from a recipe.
I just made rouladen which contained a pound and a half of bacon and I never drained an ounce of the fat off.
Quote:
I drop the dumplings.

I love me some Bisquick drop dumplings. I was raised on 'em.
You gotta add fresh chopped parsley to the dumpling batter. Yum!
Originally Posted By: Greger
You may be right, and far be it from me to suggest that anyone ever remove fat from a recipe.
I just made rouladen which contained a pound and a half of bacon and I never drained an ounce of the fat off.

LOL Heart attack, city.
Originally Posted By: california rick
You gotta add fresh chopped parsley to the dumpling batter. Yum!


Poultry seasonings works well, too. My mom used to do that.
Horsemeat in Burgers Horrifies UK Hey, how do you want your burger? Win, place, or show?
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Horsemeat in Burgers Horrifies UK Hey, how do you want your burger? Win, place, or show?





these were the cheapest sh!te frozen burgers marketed to the poor. I would say that horseflesh is probably one of the least bad additives in these burgers!

Apparently the contamination was due to bulking agents bought in from Britain or Netherlands. in most cases there was only trace equine DNA (0.01% or similar)


Only found through the rigorous testing done in the irish food industry and regulators - testing that is not done in UK or in most of Europe. I wonder how much testing goes on in the US?
Originally Posted By: Schlack
I wonder how much testing goes on in the US?
Probably less than what's done in Europe.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Horsemeat in Burgers Horrifies UK Hey, how do you want your burger? Win, place, or show?

HORSEMEAT!!! What's next, hooman meat? (which I think tastes like chicken...)
Making Shepherd's pie and salad for dinner tonight. No horsemeat involved.
Quote:
HORSEMEAT!!! What's next, hooman meat?


I don't see what's so bad about eating horse. Is it that much different from eating cows, sheep, goats, elk, deer, and bison?

My only concern would be that a horse not raised as a food animal might have been treated with some drugs that you don't ever want to consume.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
My only concern would be that a horse not raised as a food animal might have been treated with some drugs that you don't ever want to consume.

You mean like cows are? LOL

I'd eat horse meat. I wonder what psychological mechanism causes such revulsion in some folks?
Blackened chicken with portabello Alfredo sauce tonighrt.

I got no problem with horsemeat. It's just another barnyard animal. I thought it was commonly eaten in Europe providing a market for Canada's excess horses created by the premarin industry.
Originally Posted By: Greger

I got no problem with horsemeat. It's just another barnyard animal. I thought it was commonly eaten in Europe providing a market for Canada's excess horses created by the premarin industry.


i do have a problem with horsemeat in purported 100% beef burgers
Would you have a beef with lamb in 100% horsemeat burgers?
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
HORSEMEAT!!! What's next, hooman meat?


I don't see what's so bad about eating horse. Is it that much different from eating cows, sheep, goats, elk, deer, and bison?

My only concern would be that a horse not raised as a food animal might have been treated with some drugs that you don't ever want to consume.
For a lot of people it would be like eating Fido (I realize that dog is a delicacy in some countries)or (for us baby boomers)Flicker or Trigger.
I wouldn't eat my dog. But I might eat yours. I hear that dog is tough and requires a long slow cook to make it palatable.
Dog Meat is available online.
How about cats? If you do decide to cook up Fido for dinner, you better start early because I hear that you'd have to do a long hard boil to tenderize him.
I had a cougar steak once.
I've eaten bison, elk and deer meat. Pheasant, too.
Was the pheasant pleasant?
Yes, very! ThumbsUp
I've had gator, a couple of times.

Pretty tasty, until you've eaten a bit too much. Then the scent started to remind me of a dead lizard. Sort of like eating that second dozen frog legs.
A beautiful woman loved growing tomatoes, but couldn't seem to get her tomatoes to turn red.

One day while taking a stroll she came upon a gentlemen neighbor who had the most beautiful garden full of huge red tomatoes.
The woman asked the gentleman, "What do you do to get your tomatoes so red?"

The gentlemen responded, "Well, if you must know, twice a day I stand in front of my tomato garden and expose myself, and my tomatoes turn red from blushing so much."

Since the woman had tried everything else she could think of and was out of ideas, she decided to try doing the same things to her tomato garden to see
if it would work. So twice a day for two weeks, she exposed herself to her garden, hoping for the best.

One day the gentlemen was passing by and asked the woman, "By the way, how did you make out? Did your tomatoes turn red?

"No," she replied, "but my cucumbers are enormous."
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
I've had gator, a couple of times.

Pretty tasty, until you've eaten a bit too much. Then the scent started to remind me of a dead lizard. Sort of like eating that second dozen frog legs.

I et beaver tail beavertail once.
Only once? coffee

Originally Posted By: logtrol
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: logtroll
My second ex-wife...

Golly, Loggy, how many times have you been hitched? Hmm

I'm on the last time, now - third time's a charm. ThumbsUp


idea got it! smile

Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
I've had gator, a couple of times.

Pretty tasty, until you've eaten a bit too much. Then the scent started to remind me of a dead lizard. Sort of like eating that second dozen frog legs.

I et beaver tail beavertail once.

Did it taste like chicken? Speaking of chicken, many years ago a woman who had served as an army nurse in the Philippines during WWII told me that there was this place that was popular with many of them because of the chicken. One day one of them asked the general (or some high ranking officer)to join them for the delicious chicken. He said that there's not one gd chicken in the Philippine islands. After a little investigation, they discovered that the "chicken" was actually rat. She said that they should have been suspicious because they always were always served only thighs.
Quote:
I've had gator, a couple of times.

I've had gator lots of times. It's even available in grocery stores here. But I honestly don't care for it that much.
If it's done well and the tail is fairly tender to begin with it can be pretty good. Pounded thin, breaded and fried then served with an herb butter sauce is my favorite. But some gator is just disgustingly stringy and tough.
Quote:
that second dozen frog legs.

I'm pretty leery of frog legs. On more than one occasion I've gotten one that tastes genuinely foul.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
I've had gator, a couple of times.

Pretty tasty, until you've eaten a bit too much. Then the scent started to remind me of a dead lizard. Sort of like eating that second dozen frog legs.

I et beaver tail beavertail once.

Did it taste like chicken? Speaking of chicken, many years ago a woman who had served as an army nurse in the Philippines during WWII told me that there was this place that was popular with many of them because of the chicken. One day one of them asked the general (or some high ranking officer)to join them for the delicious chicken. He said that there's not one gd chicken in the Philippine islands. After a little investigation, they discovered that the "chicken" was actually rat. She said that they should have been suspicious because they always were always served only thighs.

The beavertail was like a rich, sweet beef, as I recall. I had bear, too, which is like really greasy pork. My Dad couldn't stand the smell of it cooking in the house (made him want to wommit), so we gave most of it away.
Quote:
couldn't stand the smell of it


That's the problem with abalone you catch yourself: After you've cleaned it, you have little interest in eating it!

I don't know what those guys eat that stinks so terribly, but it is impressive.
I've had more than a few bears myself... coffee
Nearby Wausau hold its Possum Festival every year to celebrate the little critter's help during the last Great Depression- he was many peoples' primary protein source. I've never tasted one- yet, but people who have say that possum tastes like bacon.
I never ate possum. But I understand that the (abundant) fat is sweet and not gamy like raccoon. To taste like bacon it would have to be cured like bacon but it wouldn't surprise me at all if it tasted very much like the pork belly or jowls from which bacon is made.
I have eaten armadillo on several occasions and it also resembles pork and has no gamy taste.
My mother(who was born and raised in Arkansas) loved squirrel stew. I never touched it.
In these parts, they call it squirrel hash. If some of these ol' boys didn't get that squirrel when they were young'ins, they didn't get dinner. I suspect that there are a lot of good hunters in the area. I haven't tried squirrel, yet. I got all that I can do to keep the squirrels from eating the bird seed, although I let take some.
Next thing y'all will be talking about how to cook insects... tinfoilhat sick
This American Life: 'Back door' calamari

Quote:
We got a tip about a meat plant selling pig intestines as fake calamari, wondered if it could be true, and decided to investigate.
If you want a quick tasty dish and like tomato sauce and pasta, then try this: Pickup some squid tubers, cut in about 1" length sections (or whatever you prefer), bring the sauce to boil, drop in the squid and boil/simmer until opaque (remember done, but not tough or rubbery, which is the mistake many make with octopus), pour source over pasta, and (optional)add Parmesan or Romano. Easy, quick, and tasty. Also works very well with shrimp. I like a dry red table wine with it. A cold beer also works.
Had turkey with all the trimmings this past Sunday. Turkey pot pie followed on Monday- and it was delicious. I'm sure that it offends some gourmets sensibilities, but damn it tastes good! I also bought 2 jars of turkey gravy (can reseal, refrigerate, and use next day)and poured a little on the turkey pot pie. Tastes good to this peasant. I also made a pot of turkey soup. Turkey necks were available, so I picked up 6 pounds. Tossed the turkey necks into the stock pot, covered with water, boiled, and removed scum. Then dropped in turkey carcass with a little meat still on it, boiled, removed scum, and then add rib celery, onion embedded with cloves, one carrot, considerable garlic, parsley, etc, including usual spice. Let it boil for a few hours, strain, refrigerate overnight, remove fat, and you have a very tasty broth. Heat broth (optional: add a little French vermouth), add noodles, carrots, leftover turkey, whatever, and season to taste. It's a good bowl of soup and makes a meal. Incidentally, IMO- the broth is good for only 2 days, so what I'm having for dinner had been frozen and is about thawed. I had the fresh broth Tues. and Wed. Tom Turkey works for me!
I don't know if this Garlic Soup will live up to its promises and defeat colds, flu and even norovirus, but the recipe looks good. I usually toss in 3 or 4 bulbs of garlic and any loose small cloves when I make a pot of turkey or chicken soup.
Joe-I have never heard of garlic soup-or that it is good for colds. let us know!

Rick-we call pig intestines "Chitlins". Make sure they are thoroughly cleaned before cooking!
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Joe-I have never heard of garlic soup-or that it is good for colds. let us know!

Legend has it that not only is garlic good for warding off vampires, but it also works on colds. When I was around 10 or so, I remember my mother fixing a minced garlic and olive oil sandwich on some dark bread (I think that it was pumpernickel)to help fight some cold. My uncle recommended it, and since he was in his 80's or 90's everyone assumed that he knew what he was talking about. I never got to find out, because I wouldn't eat the sandwich and hide it under a sofa cushion. Tastes change and I wouldn't have any problem with that garlic sandwich now. At any rate, I do toss in a number of bulbs of garlic in my soups and sauces(and lesser extent stews). I like garlic, but I do have a hard time with it in any canned sauce or soup. Someday when I make the garlic soup, I will let you know. It looks like a good recipe.
Garlic eh?

try Chicken roasted with 40 cloves of garlic!
Been there, done that, and proudly wear the T-shirt. You rub olive oil on the chicken first, right?
I am making a one-pot meal tonight. It is adapted from a Girl Scout outdoor meal recipe. We call it Mexican rice casserole.

I pound ground beef or diced chicken
I cup rice
1 pkg frozen corn
1 large jar of chunky salsa or picante sauce
1can diced green chiles
1 can sliced black olives
2-3 cups shredded Colby/jack cheese mix
1/2diced onion 2 minced garlic cloves
1/2 teaspoon Mexican oregano
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
seasoned salt and pepper to taste
3-4 cups water
Olive oil

Saute rice onions and garlic in olive oil until onions and garlic are translucent. Add ground beef(or chicken) and cook until well done. Pour in salsa, oregano, salt and pepper and heat to bubbling. Add water, and cheese until cheese melts, than all other ingredients. Cook until water is absorbed and rice is fully cooked. About 40 minutes from start to finish. This makes about 4 servings. I usually serve warm tortillas with this. a nice romaine, tomato and avocado salad goes well too. Ice cold Coronas to drink. For dessert, I recommend flan.

One pot meals are great! I wait until the onions are translucent, then I add the garlic and saute until golden brown, otherwise, if the garlic goes dark,it tastes bitter. A minor point, but it does make a difference in a pot of tomato sauce or scrambled eggs.
That is a good idea, Joe!
I made a one pot meal tonight too!
Adapted from a Cajun recipe...we call it Jambalaya!
I cooked the chicken and Andouille sausage in the Jambalaya but I didn't want my shrimp overcooked so I blackened it and served it on top of the jambalaya.
Originally Posted By: Greger
I made a one pot meal tonight too!
Adapted from a Cajun recipe...we call it Jambalaya!
I cooked the chicken and Andouille sausage in the Jambalaya but I didn't want my shrimp overcooked so I blackened it and served it on top of the jambalaya.


That sounds good-except for the shrimp. I like my jambalaya without shellfish.
Oh yes-My Mexican rice dinner turned out very well. I had the salad and Mr. Scoutgal had tortillas. I used salsa for salad dressing. And I sprinkled some cotijo cheese on the salad as well.
Quote:
I like my jambalaya without shellfish.

Then you would have loved mine since I made it without shellfish.
Shrimp cooks in about 1 minute. Beyond that it's overdone.
Jambalaya, after the initial cooking of the ingredients and addition of stock and rice, needs to simmer 20 minutes for the rice to cook. That's enough to ruin most shellfish.
For you, my dear, some blackened chicken and a garni of pan seared trinity on top!
Substitutions are not only allowed but encouraged at Che Mark's Kitchen
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
I like my jambalaya without shellfish.

Then you would have loved mine since I made it without shellfish.
Shrimp cooks in about 1 minute. Beyond that it's overdone.
Jambalaya, after the initial cooking of the ingredients and addition of stock and rice, needs to simmer 20 minutes for the rice to cook. That's enough to ruin most shellfish.
For you, my dear, some blackened chicken and a garni of pan seared trinity on top!
Substitutions are not only allowed but encouraged at Che Mark's Kitchen


I would gladly partake of this delicious dish!
It is seriously "deep in the woods", but even the drive getting there is great, and the food in the Hutte is, indeed, a great homesyle blend of Alps/Appalachian cooking.


Yours,
Issodhos
Orange chicken, brown rice, steamed broccoli. Tomorrow night, chicken Coq au Vin.
Originally Posted By: issodhos
It is seriously "deep in the woods", but even the drive getting there is great, and the food in the Hutte is, indeed, a great homesyle blend of Alps/Appalachian cooking.


Yours,
Issodhos


That was a wonderful video, Iss! ThumbsUp
Damn, that deer meat looks good! You have to know what you're doing to pull that one off. If I'm ever in West Virginia, I'll definitely try that pit BBQ.

More years than I care to remember ago, I dated a young lady whose family were in part Pennsylvania Dutch and off the reservation, so to speak. I became aware of and attended the Kuntztown (Amish?)Fair with her. What I remember from that experience, besides thoroughly enjoying myself, and paying $1 for a Bud was the Amish/Dutch guy cooking a whole cow on a spit and watching him bast it. My inner carnivore leaped to surface and I was ready for a plate, but the cow wasn't done yet. My companion seemed somewhat repulsed by the sight, but it looked damn good to moi. However, I don't remember the chief using any mechanical device to rotate the steer on the spit (30+ years ago), because my attention was on the beef.

Joe~That was an awesome video! ThumbsUp
That cow rotating on the spit brought out my inner carnivore.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
That cow rotating on the spit brought out my inner carnivore.


Mine too! grin
Damn, it looked good!
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Damn, it looked good!


Now you've got me thinking to go to our neighborhood BBQ place for dinner tonight! grin
My chef is directing the assembly of green chile and cheese enchiladas tonight. Locally made corn tortillas, Hatch green chile sauce, chicken cooked on the Cobb grill with a little mesquite smoke, and a pile of spicey Tillamook jalapeno jack cheese. The dogs and cats are mooching cheese, the oldest Jack Russell never learned to catch food tossed at him... he actually shuts his eyes and only manages to catch on accident. I try not to laugh at him.

I forgot, diced onions, too. Guacamole on top. Mmmmmm.
I made baked ziti last night for dinner. It turned out well. I also made salad and garlic Parmesan cheese bread to go with it. Tiramisu for dessert.
Mmmmm, bread! ThumbsUp
I make something similar to the above recipe, but call it Italian bread. About the only difference is that I bake it on a pizza stone, don't roll it (I'm going to try that), bake at a higher temp, dump a cup of water in the broiler pan on the lowest oven rack, and, depending upon how I feel, sometimes add either sesame or poppy seeds. I also tried using some other more traditional flours, such as Semolina, etc., but the slight difference in taste wasn't worth the additional expense- to me. Those with a more sensitive palate may disagree. I find that King Arthur's all purpose unbleached flour is great. It tastes the best that this peasant has tried.

The reason that I posted the video is because I believe it's an easy and inexpensive way to begin baking your own bread. Why? Because it smells and tastes so much better. Once you get over any initial hesitancy, you'll have a hard time going back to store bought bread. Also, you really don't need a bread machine, although if someone gave me one, I'd take it.
I read some crap somewhere recently that you're supposed to stop eating wheat, because it's bad for you. I don't know, but I do know that people have been eating it for thousands of years and that I like it. Is it bad for you? I don't know, but I've never gotten sluggish or sick from eating good bread or pastry. Wheat's track record seems pretty damn good to me. For the rare few who can't tolerate gluten, don't eat it.
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
I read some crap somewhere recently that you're supposed to stop eating wheat, because it's bad for you. I don't know, but I do know that people have been eating it for thousands of years and that I like it. Is it bad for you? I don't know, but I've never gotten sluggish or sick from eating good bread or pastry. Wheat's track record seems pretty damn good to me. For the rare few who can't tolerate gluten, don't eat it.

It turns out that some people are gluten intolerate and the condition is called celiac disease.
Yesterday at the high school, the cook was making the district's famous Pittburger. It's dough with sloppy joe-like meat in the middle with American Cheese (USDA commodity from Land O' Lakes) on top of the meat with more dough on top.

The cook put letting the dough rise in a large stainless bowl, and it started spilling over the sides (because she was multi-tasking and working on something else) and it became a gooey clean-up process.
My grandma and mom used to make larger biscuit dough rounds and fill them with meat and veggies, then bake them in the oven, My dad used to take these to work(when we had a family business) for lunch. They were great for us kids to eat picnic-style outside in the backyard.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
My grandma and mom used to make larger biscuit dough rounds and fill them with meat and veggies, then bake them in the oven, My dad used to take these to work(when we had a family business) for lunch. They were great for us kids to eat picnic-style outside in the backyard.


Ours are made in hotel pans - so we cut ours into squares. They are a really simple, complete, nutritious (depending on ingredients and ingredient quality) meal and truly are 'what the poor folks are eatin' tonight..."
"About the only difference is that I bake it on a pizza stone, don't roll it (I'm going to try that), bake at a higher temp, dump a cup of water in the broiler pan on the lowest oven rack, and, depending upon how I feel, sometimes add either sesame or poppy seeds."

Other than that -- exactly the same!

There are actually a lot of different ways to bake yur own bread. Hie thee to the library and check out "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day." It really isn't five minutes, but this guy has made it really easy to have a loaf of bread in the oven five minutes after you get the oven heated.

And if you bake a lot, you may want to drop by a local donut shop and ask them if they will add a fifty-pound bag of unbleached flour for you in their next order. Typically it's a lot less expensive than anywhere else, including the big box stores.

Don't ask at a bread bakery, though. They certainly aren't in business to help you compete with them.

storage of flour:

Go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy their 5-gallon paint buckets with lids. Food safe and seal tightly.

Alternatively, you can frequently get them for nothing from McD's or similar. do NOT, though, get the buckets used to store pickles. The smell will not come out.
Joe, I've honed my deli rye recipe as per your suggestions a while back and finally feel comfortable with my rye bread. I made Reubins with it recently and they were superb.

Imbolc feast was tonight. Ten guests, seven course. Chef is exhausted and the kitchen's a wreck.

One of the guests was from Key West and he brought Conch Fritter batter. Another brought Ginger Snaps made with cannibutter.

Bailey's Irish Cream Tiramisu with homemade vanilla gelato was the dessert.
Lamb stew matched with a Spanish Riojo the main course.

blessed be
Sounds delicious, Geger! Blessed Be to you as well.
King Arthur Flour sells a rye bread improver and a deli rye flavor to enhance the flavor and texture of rye. I make a seeded (caraway seeds) deli rye, which tastes good to me. It tastes a lot better than anything that I bought in these modern day bakeries and it's a lot less expensive. At any rate, I ordered the deli rye flavor to try it. I'll let you know how it works.

I read somewhere that the color of the bread you ate determined your class/social standing. The rich "elites" ate white bread exclusively. The peasants the darker whole grain breads, when they were lucky to get it. I was raised with the darker whole grain breads and still prefer them over white. They taste better. However, there is one exception: whenever I have soft shell crab, I serve it on toasted white bread. When I was first introduced to this delicacy, the soft shell crab was served on toasted white bread and I just kept the tradition.
Originally Posted By: Greger

Bailey's Irish Cream Tiramisu


How did it compare to your regular version?

Tonights delight is a simple roast chicken, roast taters, roasted brocolli (vinegar, oilive oil and soy sauce) and gravy.

Planning Mr's Schlacks Bday dinner next week.

Thinking of going with Pork loin on the bone, Crackling, Herb and onion stuffing, sauteed brussel sprouts, Apple sauce and gravy.

- any suggestions?
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Originally Posted By: Greger

Bailey's Irish Cream Tiramisu


How did it compare to your regular version?

Tonights delight is a simple roast chicken, roast taters, roasted brocolli (vinegar, oilive oil and soy sauce) and gravy.

Planning Mr's Schlacks Bday dinner next week.

Thinking of going with Pork loin on the bone, Crackling, Herb and onion stuffing, sauteed brussel sprouts, Apple sauce and gravy.

- any suggestions?


That birthday dinner sounds delicious. Lucky Mrs. schlack! What are thinking for dessert?
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal


That birthday dinner sounds delicious. Lucky Mrs. schlack! What are thinking for dessert?


the baileys tiramasu has been demanded and who am I to argue?
You are a very good husband, schlack! ThumbsUp
I made a double recipe of the Tiramisu. A dozen egg yolks, two pounds of Mascarpone cheese, two shots of esspresso and about a cup of Bailey's. The ladyfingers were soaked in equal amounts of esspresso and Bailey's.
The custard didn't thicken as much as I would have liked and to me the Bailey's flavor didn't come through as much as I wanted. But that's just being nitpicky.
It was amazing!
Next time I may cook the custard or just add a little gelatin to help it thicken like a panna cota.
I've made tiramisu with no spirits, with Amaretto and now with Bailey's. The Amaretto flavor comes through a little better but I still preferred the Irish Cream version.
Maybe if I had Irish Whiskey I'd skip the Bailey's and add it directly to the custard. All the other ingredients are already there.
Maybe if I had Irish whisky I'd add it directly to the chef...!
It's Super Bowl Sunday, and I made some guacamole and fresh salsa and mini tostadas. Also a veggie tray with sour cream green onion dip. Tortilla chips to dip. BBQing chicken for dinner in a mesquite-lime-garlic marinade. Spanish rice and grilled zucchini as accompaniments. For dessert, I have vanilla ice cream, with chocolate fudge sauce, Kahlua and caramel sauce sprinkled with chopped toasted pecans.
Quote:
Maybe if I had Irish whisky I'd add it directly to the chef...!

Don't fret, lad, the chef started with hard cider, had a variety of fine wines, a buttery nipple somewhere along the line, a few locally brewed ales, some high grade marijuana, some hookah, a few cannibutter gingersnaps, a flagon of mead, and a glass of port.
I didn't get into the hard stuff because I was serving a feast to a bunch of Pagan revelers (and one Christian) but I managed to cop a bit of a buzz along the way.

We had Cincinnati Chili 3-ways for dinner tonight and I'm practicing hot water pastry crusts tonight. Schlack should be very familiar with these but all I've ever done is a regular pate brisee made with cold water. I figured it was way past time to learn this simple recipe.
Ice Cream Cone Rose:





Taco Salad. Not proud of it, but my 29-year-old son is cooking it. Proud of him. I'll wash the pan.
It is Shrove Tuesday, so it is pancakes for me. That is a long tradition in the Lutheran Church-at least it is at the one I attend. grin
What, no lutefisk and yams?

Actually, I just had a very nice meatloaf on ciabatta sandwich, with hot-house tomato and slices of my own homegrown Hass avocado.


PIA,
(Son of Martin, Nephew of Luther)
PIA~I never did like lutefisk, and I cannot eat yams on a dialysis diet. I prefer lefsa, anyway, or gravlax. But pancakes are the traditional food, so that is what I make! wink
guacamole, perhaps?
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington

I always wondered...

Walmart's British Supermarket Arm Finds Horse DNA In Bolognese Sauce, Pulls Products

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/14/walmart-horsemeat_n_2688782.html?ir=Business

To beef or not to beef, that is equestrian.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington


That was cute! ThumbsUp
I'm working on a Monte Christo sandwich recipe. That's ham and Swiss (and optional turkey) with the bread crust removed, quartered, speared with a toothpick then dipped in batter a deep fried. Delicious but too greasy on the first attempt, I need a crispier batter which will brown faster and seal the grease out of the sandwich. Once fried the sandwich is dusted with confectioners sugar and dipped in Blackberry(or other) Jam.
I love Montecristo sandwiches(sans powdered sugar)! Disneyland's Blue Bayou Restaurant and the Orleans cafe there both have very good ones. What do you use for your batter?

Here is one I've used:


Original recipe makes 16 mini sandwiches Change Servings

1 quart oil for frying, or as needed

2/3 cup water

1 egg

2/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

8 slices white bread

4 slices Swiss cheese

4 slices turkey

4 slices ham

1 tablespoon confectioners' sugar for dusting

Directions

Heat 5 inches of oil in a deep-fryer to 365 degrees F (180 degrees C). While oil is heating, make the batter: In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg and water. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt and pepper; whisk into the egg mixture until smooth. Set aside in the refrigerator.
Assemble sandwiches by placing one slice of turkey on one slice of bread, a slice of ham on another, then sandwich them with the Swiss cheese in the middle. Cut sandwiches into quarters, and secure with toothpicks.
Dip each sandwich quarter in the batter so that all sides are coated. Deep fry in the hot oil until golden brown on all sides. Remove toothpicks and arrange on a serving tray. Dust with confectioners' sugar just before serving.

I would also place the sandwiches on a paper towel, before transferring them to a plate.
That's exactly the recipe I used.

The batter cooked too slowly and hence absorbed too much oil.

The sandwich was good, but I'm not satisfied with just "good".
I might try 50% rice flour or tapioca flour in the batter to see if I can make it crispier.

Maybe my fryer has problems and isn't getting hot enough or re-heating fast enough after food is put into it.
Try adding a little beer(replacing some of the liquid), and get a thermometer to check the oil temperature. That might help, along with a change in the kind of flour that you use.
I'd be hard put to waste a beer for something as frivolous as a frying batter. Maybe some seltzer water... ^%^
Beer batter is great! But seltzer might work. I also make a beer/lime/cilantro/garlic/olive oil marinade for chicken-it is wonderful! And if you want some heat, add a jalapeno(diced) or two.
I checked some battered fish recipes and oddly enough they use seltzer water. But this was the first time I did this so I didn't expect truly stellar results. I've been drinking hard cider lately rather than beer but I always have fizzy water on hand. I'll keep working on this and maybe replace my fryer soon.
It's a cheap GE and I work a fryer pretty hard. Maybe I'll start saving up for a little Waring commercial fryer, I deserve it.
^L^
Oh, you do! ThumbsUp
got home and though the cupboard was a bit bare, but after a bit of thought had roasted onions, bacon slivers and tater cubes on a little dressed salad, poached egg on top.

sweet jeebus was it good.
That sounds mighty good, Schlack! Simple and efficient.
We went into O-ville this afternoon to stock up on metaphysical items and it turns out the magic store is right next door to a nice little Vietnamese place. I had pho with beef balls, bible tripe, tendon and well done flank.
With a Durian Fruit milkshake.
Life just don't get no better than that!

Maybe it would be better if I had one of These.

If they keep that price on it I'll grab one in a month or so.


One thing that I like as much as meatloaf is meatloaf sandwiches. Laura's right about the bread crumbs, including other dishes. I use a 50/50 ground beef/pork mix, and add a little horseradish, but essentially it's the same recipe. If you are a young person, not experienced in the fine art of meatloaf, and want to impress someone with your culinary skills, then begin with a meatloaf made with Hunt's Seasoned Sauce for Meatloaf and use Progresso Bread crumbs or some generic (I assure you that if you have peasant tastes like this peasant that it will taste good). It also makes a good sandwich (ketchup and mustard)and is relatively inexpensive (and you don't have to use beef/pork/veal, unless you have a friendly butcher). Get you 2 lbs of ground beef, instant Idaho mashed potatoes (I like the garlic), and whatever vegetable. This peasant loves this dish. If you want to learn how to cook Italian (like I do), then subscribe to her YouTube videos.
One of my favorite dishes is a beef bottom round with mashed potatoes and green beans. I marinate the bottom round for a day or more in some beef broth, red wine, and garlic. In the past, I've always used a Cabernet, but from now on it's Merlot.
I made a pot roast for St. Patrick's Day, with celery, baby red potatoes and carrots. I tried one of those concentrated beef stock packets with it(I had a coupon for a free sample). I seared the pot roasts(also on sale), put it in the crock pot, added the beef stock concentrate, parsley, ground black pepper, Lawry's Seasoned salt, garlic, 1 packet Lipton onion soup mix, Worcestershire sauce and a bay leaf. Then piled on all the vegetables, and pored 1 cup of red wine(Caberbet Sauvignon), and 5 cups of water. Covered with lid, and I cooked this on high for 3 hours and then switched the temperature to low for another three hours. It turned out really well. I made a gravy out of the juices and served it with a green salad and Hawaiian King rolls. Yesterday, we had pot roast sandwiches and more salad for dinner.
I make a similar pot roast and serve with egg noodles.
I have never had pot roast and egg noodles!
I serve it on top of egg noodles with a wine/beef sauce and carrots or string beans. Some people serve it with potatoes or rice or with the vegetables that they cooked with the beef (usually in a crock pot). I strain the vegetables when I make the wine sauce.
Potroast with noodles is essentially Beef Stroganoff.

Traditionally that has sour cream and mushrooms in it but like all recipes there's a lot of room for adjustments by the chef.

I've been using sausage in my meatloaf rather than just ground pork. First by necessity, because I couldn't find the ground pork in any of the freezers, but since then by design because I liked it better.
Originally Posted By: Greger
... Beef Stroganoff.

Known in Montana as Wanking Bull.
Clever this morning aren't we....? =____=
Originally Posted By: Greger
Clever this morning aren't we....? =____=

Alas, no. I wish 'twere so, but 'twas nothing more than a long-conditioned stimulus/response mechanism. I have many of those, which I try to suppress around my wife. rolleyes
Originally Posted By: Greger
Potroast with noodles is essentially Beef Stroganoff.

Traditionally that has sour cream and mushrooms in it but like all recipes there's a lot of room for adjustments by the chef.

I've been using sausage in my meatloaf rather than just ground pork. First by necessity, because I couldn't find the ground pork in any of the freezers, but since then by design because I liked it better.

That's essentially true for most dishes. The ethnics vary, but the product is essentially the same. For example, wrap some meat, vegetable, cheese, and/or any combination in some dough and deep fry, broil, boil, or whatever, serving with or without sauce, and what do you have? More or less the same worldwide.

Regarding ground pork: Ever consider getting a meat grinder? You can make your own sausage, which is far superior to anything that you may purchase. Years ago my local butcher almost went apoplectic when I asked him to ground some pork for me (meatloaf). He correctly said that it would contaminate his grinder (beef). Some supermarket offer a beef/pork/veal mix for meatloaf.
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Greger
... Beef Stroganoff.

Known in Montana as Wanking Bull.
Ever have a buffalo meatloaf in Montana?
I almost bought some ground Bison yesterday.
First buffalo meat meatloaf that I had was in Montana. I'm in NW Florida (aka the Panhandle). They eat deer meat here and not venison.
Most grocery stores seem to carry Bison these days. I wasn't sure of the fat content though so I didn't buy it. It's notoriously lean and I wanted to make sliders which require fairly fatty beef.
I just ordered 13 rabbits(frozen cut up fryers) from South Carolina. Rabbit Meat (bunnison?) is the healthiest meat available, lowest bad fat, highest good fat, and fewest calories of all the food meats. Also tastes WAY better than poultry and can be substituted for chicken in any recipe.
Do you intend to ambush the Easter Bunny?
Originally Posted By: Greger

I just ordered 13 rabbits(frozen cut up fryers) from South Carolina. Rabbit Meat (bunnison?) is the healthiest meat available, lowest bad fat, highest good fat, and fewest calories of all the food meats. Also tastes WAY better than poultry and can be substituted for chicken in any recipe.


I hear that Australia has a huge surplus of rabbits.... just sayin....
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Ever have a buffalo meatloaf in Montana?

Not in Montana, but there is restaurant in town here in New Mexico that makes it. Very good!
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Do you intend to ambush the Easter Bunny?

I didn't know chocolate was considered to be a meat???
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Originally Posted By: Greger
Potroast with noodles is essentially Beef Stroganoff.

Traditionally that has sour cream and mushrooms in it but like all recipes there's a lot of room for adjustments by the chef.

I've been using sausage in my meatloaf rather than just ground pork. First by necessity, because I couldn't find the ground pork in any of the freezers, but since then by design because I liked it better.

That's essentially true for most dishes. The ethnics vary, but the product is essentially the same. For example, wrap some meat, vegetable, cheese, and/or any combination in some dough and deep fry, broil, boil, or whatever, serving with or without sauce, and what do you have? More or less the same worldwide.

Regarding ground pork: Ever consider getting a meat grinder? You can make your own sausage, which is far superior to anything that you may purchase. Years ago my local butcher almost went apoplectic when I asked him to ground some pork for me (meatloaf). He correctly said that it would contaminate his grinder (beef). Some supermarket offer a beef/pork/veal mix for meatloaf.


How interesting. I just had the same conversation with the butcher at the Bi-Lo I frequent (frequently). They had pork loins on sale for 1.99 a pound and I wanted a whole one cut up to manageable roasts with some ground. Said he couldn't do it.

So I bought the whole thing and while a 2-pounder was roasting in the oven, rubbed with some Chinese sage, I got out my Oster Kitchen Center and used the grinder I got on eBay about five years ago and had never used before.

It worked a champ except it kept clogging up. I ground about 2 pounds and then threw in some sage, salt, pepper, and voila sausage patties. I fried up a small one and shared it with the spousal unit, who pronounced it good.

The rest I molded into patties and froze in vac-seal bags.

I've found that I can get a much better quality of ground beef by buying a roast and having it ground. Also I KNOW how fresh it is, and I either use it or freeze it immediately.
Originally Posted By: Greger
I almost bought some ground Bison yesterday.


My father claimed to have a recipe that required buffalo and squid of all things: his bison-tentacle recipe.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington

I've found that I can get a much better quality of ground beef by buying a roast and having it ground. Also I KNOW how fresh it is, and I either use it or freeze it immediately.


Yeah
I buy from an asian store where you can see them grinding up the meat as needed.... the quality difference is amazing
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Joe Keegan
Do you intend to ambush the Easter Bunny?

I didn't know chocolate was considered to be a meat???
More like the air that you breath in some circles rather than a meat. I received one Easter card many moons ago. It had a chocolate Easter bunny with its ears chomped off with the word HUH? printed above. I thought that it was funny.
The bunnies I ordered were killed and butchered early this morning, wrapped and frozen, shipped with dry ice in the afternoon.
They'll be here Friday and I'll make Rabbit Pie and Rabbit stew (Hasenpfeffer) for the Ostara Feast Saturday night. Deviled eggs are also on the menu. We just finished coloring eggs.

Today is actually Ostara
Blessed be.
Originally Posted By: Ardy
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington

I've found that I can get a much better quality of ground beef by buying a roast and having it ground. Also I KNOW how fresh it is, and I either use it or freeze it immediately.


Yeah
I buy from an asian store where you can see them grinding up the meat as needed.... the quality difference is amazing


But do you know what they're grinding?
Just kidding.
I actually have a big old hand operated meat grinder that my old uncle charlie used when he butchered hogs and deer. I'm to lazy to do that though. When I buy a whole pork loin I slice most of it into chops for wienershnizel and the rest I just slice really thin for stirfries, curries, and such. It's too dry for me to roast. I prefer Butts and Picnics for that.
For the same reason I prefer market ground beef for making sliders. I want a 70/30 mix, 80/20 tops for sliders.

If you're the last customer of the day your butcher can grind anything you want just before he cleans up his machinery.
I have discovered that my local Albertson's market (a SuperValue chain) grinds up all of their leftover roasts and trimmings on Friday night before they close the meat department. They put it out in the usual ground beef cold case area, but at less than half their normal ground beef price per pound. (Usually $1.79/pound versus $3 something for the mass-produced stuff out of the giant chubs.) It is easy to see they ground it themselves, since it does not have the firmly-packed texture of their usual ground beef. (Makes very nice loose patties for frying.)

Interesting thing about this meat: They make no claims about the fat content, like they do on their regular packages. I guess they can't, since they don't know. Anyway, every time I have bought it, I think the fat content has been so low that no tallow is left in a frying pan after frying a patty! I know this is unsuitable for some recipes, but they normally charge a premium price for low fat ground beef.

I buy three to five pounds, when I can find it, and cook up some meat loaf or barbeque some patties to put in the freezer. Then anytime we need an easy meal, we can just take out enough for one or two people and microwave it.
Originally Posted By: Greger
The bunnies I ordered were killed and butchered early this morning, wrapped and frozen, shipped with dry ice in the afternoon.
They'll be here Friday and I'll make Rabbit Pie and Rabbit stew (Hasenpfeffer) for the Ostara Feast Saturday night. Deviled eggs are also on the menu. We just finished coloring eggs.

Today is actually Ostara
Blessed be.
I enjoy rabbit, which tastes similar to chicken, but meatier. Most chicken and rabbit recipes are interchangeable.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Originally Posted By: Greger
I almost bought some ground Bison yesterday.


My father claimed to have a recipe that required buffalo and squid of all things: his bison-tentacle recipe.
Buy Centennial?? What's a book by Michener got to do with the topic?
The warranty on the recipe expired in 1976.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
...It worked a champ except it kept clogging up. I ground about 2 pounds and then threw in some sage, salt, pepper, and voila sausage patties. I fried up a small one and shared it with the spousal unit, who pronounced it good. ...

So who won the election?
Originally Posted By: Greger
The bunnies I ordered were killed and butchered early this morning, wrapped and frozen, shipped with dry ice in the afternoon.
They'll be here Friday and I'll make Rabbit Pie and Rabbit stew (Hasenpfeffer) for the Ostara Feast Saturday night. Deviled eggs are also on the menu. We just finished coloring eggs.

Today is actually Ostara
Blessed be.


Grand so, Ill be over by around 5 on Friday for a few pre-dinner cocktails.
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Originally Posted By: Greger
The bunnies I ordered were killed and butchered early this morning, wrapped and frozen, shipped with dry ice in the afternoon.
They'll be here Friday and I'll make Rabbit Pie and Rabbit stew (Hasenpfeffer) for the Ostara Feast Saturday night. Deviled eggs are also on the menu. We just finished coloring eggs.

Today is actually Ostara
Blessed be.


Grand so, Ill be over by around 5 on Friday for a few pre-dinner cocktails.


Thx for the warning Schlack
I will come at 1:30 to help warm things up for your arrival
Originally Posted By: Ardy
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Originally Posted By: Greger
The bunnies I ordered were killed and butchered early this morning, wrapped and frozen, shipped with dry ice in the afternoon.
They'll be here Friday and I'll make Rabbit Pie and Rabbit stew (Hasenpfeffer) for the Ostara Feast Saturday night. Deviled eggs are also on the menu. We just finished coloring eggs.

Today is actually Ostara
Blessed be.
Grand so, Ill be over by around 5 on Friday for a few pre-dinner cocktails.
Thx for the warning Schlack
I will come at 1:30 to help warm things up for your arrival

I volunteer to answer the door and greet the guests in my penguin soot.
All are welcome! I restocked the bar and there's plenty of the local brew on hand.
I'll call the circle around 6:00 and all who wish may take part in the smudging and purification ceremony. We will honour the goddess Eostre and the god I've chosen for the evening is Kokopelli, an American Indian fertility god.
Then the feast begins.
We're going to start with a variety of cheeses, relishes and deli meats. Hot Cross Buns will be served with those. The cross will, of course, be a witches cross which represents the four quarters of the moon.
We will move from there to a salad course made with Spring Greens and assorted vegetables which will be served with a chipotle deviled egg.
The soup will be Hasenpfeffer as I mentioned above,
the seafood course a crab and artichoke spread on freshly baked bread.
Main course is the rabbit pie for those still able to eat.

Dessert is a selection of honey glazed spice cakes, called Cauldron Cakes in the Harry Potter series, or little lemon curd layer cakes.

After dinner Mead will be served on the smoking porch as we gather around the Hookah, there are a variety of new flavors of shisha available. There is a fair chance it will be spiked with high grade marijuana and I've heard rumours that cannibutter cookies will be available for those who prefer not to smoke.
There will be a small fire and plenty of seating in the back garden where we can gather around to meditate, roast marshmallows or just enjoy our drinks or a bowl of herb.



Who knew the Heathen Way could be so civilized??
get thee behind me, Satan
for I am first in line
Quote:
All are welcome! I restocked the bar and there's plenty of the local brew on hand.
I'll call the circle around 6:00 and all who wish may take part in the smudging and purification ceremony. We will honour the goddess Eostre and the god I've chosen for the evening is Kokopelli, an American Indian fertility god.
Then the feast begins.

Sounds lovely, Greger. I'm a big fan of Kokopelli...his image appears around Casa SuZQ in more than one place. But, I think I'd have to pass on the bunny fare. I'm certain it probably tastes divine, but I just have this hang up about eating little furry creatures, no matter what their current state (I'd keep conjuring up images of Peter Rabbit hopping around in my head, I'm afraid).

I am heading towards Florida soon...unfortunately, not until later in April. Sorry I'll miss the festivities.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Originally Posted By: Greger
I almost bought some ground Bison yesterday.


My father claimed to have a recipe that required buffalo and squid of all things: his bison-tentacle recipe.


LOL
Beltane is April 30. I usually hold the feast on the nearest Saturday. I'm leaning towards roast pig for that one.
I could never kill a bunny myself but I have no qualms about eating one nor do I imagine my not eating one would save a bunnies life.

Get in my belly, Bunny!

These lil guys are only 8-10 weeks old when they're sent across the rainbow bridge, like rabbits in the wild they breed fast and die young. Such is life at the bottom of the food chain.
Sliders on the Cobb
Nice,

having burgers tonight myself!

inspired by Greg, Im making the effort tomorrow night. Its only Mrs Schlack and I but I think were worth it!


Selection of salamis and cold meats
Blackened sweet red peppers
Hummus
Baba Ganoush
Red onion and tomato salad
Selection of pickles and mustards
Garlic flatbreads - based on a naan recipie
Well done Schlack! A culinary journey through the middle east!

I'm catering a wine walk tonight. Spring theme of course so I'm doing deviled eggs, a big veggie tray with dip. a dozen baguettes, a deli tray and a few assorted blocks of cheese.
I don't think the 96 deviled eggs will last all night so I'm making a big batch of the crab and artichoke spread to put out when they're gone. There's a lot of overlap between this wine event and the Ostara Feast tomorrow night.

The bunnies were in Orlando last night and should hop into my kitchen soon!
Quote:
I could never kill a bunny myself but I have no qualms about eating one nor do I imagine my not eating one would save a bunnies life.

Very true, Greger. This is just my own little personal food hang up. For as long as I can recall, I've had this rule that I won't eat any animal in it's baby form, i.e., veal, lamb, bunnies etc. It goes along with my other little food phobia...not eating anything that has eyes looking back up at me from the serving plate (whole fish, lobsters, full sized roasted pigs, etc.) Friends like to tell me I'm crazy, but hey, we already knew that! grin
Originally Posted By: SuZQ
Quote:
I could never kill a bunny myself but I have no qualms about eating one nor do I imagine my not eating one would save a bunnies life.

Very true, Greger. This is just my own little personal food hang up. For as long as I can recall, I've had this rule that I won't eat any animal in it's baby form, i.e., veal, lamb, bunnies etc. It goes along with my other little food phobia...not eating anything that has eyes looking back up at me from the serving plate (whole fish, lobsters, full sized roasted pigs, etc.) Friends like to tell me I'm crazy, but hey, we already knew that! grin


My family and friends think I'm nuts because I won't let one kind of food touch any other food on the plate, and I only eat one thing at a time, turning the plate a quarter turn to the right(counter-clockwise) as I start on the next item. I always eat my veggies first, then my protein and then the carb. Salads, stews and soups are the only exceptions.
Quote:
I won't let one kind of food touch any other food on the plate


I used to have that fixation, but I got over it around age 8 when I discovered I liked mixtures like chili and beef stew. I think it was one of those mistaken generalizations that kids make as they are trying to figure out how the world works: Getting dirt on your apple makes it "dirty" (and thus inedible), so in general anything touching a food item makes it dirty [and here is the mistake] including other food items. LOL
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
I won't let one kind of food touch any other food on the plate


I used to have that fixation, but I got over it around age 8 when I discovered I liked mixtures like chili and beef stew. I think it was one of those mistaken generalizations that kids make as they are trying to figure out how the world works: Getting dirt on your apple makes it "dirty" (and thus inedible), so in general anything touching a food item makes it dirty [and here is the mistake] including other food items. LOL


I've been this way for almost 55 years-I'm not getting over it any time soon. LOL
Quote:
I won't eat any animal in it's baby form

I draw the line at veal. Not because the animal is young, but because it isn't treated well.
Dairy bulls are a useless by product of the dairy industry. They can't be fattened like beef cattle and so must be slaughtered young or become a liability to the farmer. In earlier times they were a boon to a farm which kept only one or two cows for dairy purposes. Tender succulent meat on the table and much needed protein.

Todays lunch...
Fried Rabbit Livers with carrot sticks and Spring greens.

SuzQ if you don't like eating things in their baby form you should really drop chicken, those fryers in the grocery store are around 7-12 weeks old. Same age as my rabbits(and their livers) livers.
They were delicious by the way, muh much milder than chicken livers.
I hear what you're saying, Greger, but somehow I never felt the same way about a chicken, young or otherwise, as I do about those other baby critters. I generally try not to think about the whole "where does my food come from" scenario if possible...if I did I think I'd be completely vegan.
Originally Posted By: Greger
...those fryers in the grocery store are around 7-12 weeks old...

Chickens, at least on the farms for the famous west coast family poultry company are exactly 48 days old; fryers are 72 days old.
Originally Posted By: SuZQ
I hear what you're saying, Greger, but somehow I never felt the same way about a chicken, young or otherwise, as I do about those other baby critters. I generally try not to think about the whole "where does my food come from" scenario if possible...if I did I think I'd be completely vegan.

Carrots have feelings too y'know....
Pretty good video, Joe!

My Easter dinner will be deviled eggs, and veggie tray for appetizers, ham(might try that spiral glazed ham recipe), scalloped potatoes, mixed veggies, rolls and a spring greens salad(mixed field greens, grape tomatoes, sliced mushrooms, pine nuts, strawberries and feta cheese with raspberry vinaigrette). Dessert are vanilla cupcakes with green tinted vanilla frosting topped green-tinted coconut and jellybean "eggs". I have a See's chocolate Easter egg for each person to take home.

Here is what I'm going to do with the deviled eggs-I saw this on Facebook:



The egg yolk filling is prepared as usual. The eyes are bits of black olive, and the beak is a sliver of raw carrot. Instead of slicing the boiled egg in half lengthwise, cut near the pointy end crosswise.
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!
That looks fun, Scout, I have 2 dozen eggs we colored for the Ostara Feast so I'll make those to surprise the girls.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!


LOL
Greger~Your colored eggs look so pretty!
Turkey's on the menu, but that ham is moving up in the queue. I love deviled eggs and those "baby chicks" peeping out from the egg are clever and an attention getter at any dinner.
Originally Posted By: Greger
That looks fun, Scout, I have 2 dozen eggs we colored for the Ostara Feast so I'll make those to surprise the girls.
You did a good job with the eggs.
Shaving cream method.
The little jars of Cake Icing Dye work best.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!

You crack me up! With them peepers, they almost looks o-live! (Face it - you egged me on and I'm too hardboiled and calcified to not take up the yolk - take care aught you say lest ye find yerself white with embarrassment at the cloaka and dagger puns).
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!

You crack me up! With them peepers, they almost looks o-live! (Face it - you egged me on and I'm too hardboiled and calcified to not take up the yolk - take care aught you say lest ye find yerself white with embarrassment at the cloaka and dagger puns).


LOL
Quote:
Carrots have feelings too y'know....

Is that what that squealing noise is??? Actually, I always try to tell them how lovely they look and feel just before I chop them up with a sharp knife... rolleyes smile
Originally Posted By: SuZQ
Quote:
Carrots have feelings too y'know....

Is that what that squealing noise is??? Actually, I always try to tell them how lovely they look and feel just before I chop them up with a sharp knife... rolleyes smile


Bwahahaha!
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!

You crack me up! With them peepers, they almost looks o-live! (Face it - you egged me on and I'm too hardboiled and calcified to not take up the yolk - take care aught you say lest ye find yerself white with embarrassment at the cloaka and dagger puns).


Here you go:




YES! A standing ovation.
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!

You crack me up! With them peepers, they almost looks o-live! (Face it - you egged me on and I'm too hardboiled and calcified to not take up the yolk - take care aught you say lest ye find yerself white with embarrassment at the cloaka and dagger puns).


Here you go:




YES! A standing ovation.


LOL
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
The one on the extreme left is Shelley. To his right is Chickov. The Brooders Karamazov are the two at top center.

And not a peep out of them!

You crack me up! With them peepers, they almost looks o-live! (Face it - you egged me on and I'm too hardboiled and calcified to not take up the yolk - take care aught you say lest ye find yerself white with embarrassment at the cloaka and dagger puns).


Here you go:




YES! A standing ovation.

Things have to eggsactly balanced, no eggsaggeration, to achieve such eggscellent results given the eggigencies tendered by the eggsistence of potential earthquakes to eggsacerbate the eggsistentiality of the soon to be eggstirpated state of balance.

Or so it seems - could be photoshopped...
such fowl puns shouldnt be condoned.

in other news: what does a hindu? it lays iggs
When I was a kid, we used to use toothpicks to draw geometric patterns on our hard-boiled eggs with melted paraffin. This acts as a mask when you dye them. You can even make multiple color patterns by starting with some wax for the original white, brown, or green egg color. Then use a light color dye like yellow (or just a quick dip in a dye). Then add more wax patterns, followed by a different dye. I have done four different dyes, resulting in five different color patterns, but the final un-waxed egg color ends up very dark.

Here's a link to a crafts web site with some examples:

Lithuanian Easter eggs

Ukrainian version

Paraffin is much cheaper than beeswax, and works fine. Also, it is translucent so you don't really have to remove it at the end.
I've always wanted to make really cool Ostara Eggs. But shoving them around in a pan of Barbasol is as close as I've ever come.
Will hvae the traditional good friday meal tomorrow

Steak, beer and life of brian

in case you didnt know, sale of alcohol is not permitted in ireland on good friday (hotels & bone fide travelers excepted)
We had our annual Opening Day party yesterday. Mr. Scoutgal grilled Dodger dogs, we had more of those deviled eggs, potato salad, green salad, baked beans and chips and dip. It was a grand feast!
I've got a pizza dough resting for it's last time before I toss it and spin it and turn it into a pizza. Half with garlic and olive oil, half with red sauce. Sausage onions and black olives except for one slice with just cheese.

A caesar salad to start and New York Cheesecake with blueberry topping for dessert.
Tonight is a beef stew in the crock pot, salad and rolls. And yes, schlack-I made the stew with cut up red rose potatoes, carrots, onions, sliced mushrooms and parsnips with red wine and a nice thick gravy(American style)! wink
Originally Posted By: Greger
I've got a pizza dough resting for it's last time before I toss it and spin it and turn it into a pizza. Half with garlic and olive oil, half with red sauce. Sausage onions and black olives except for one slice with just cheese.

A caesar salad to start and New York Cheesecake with blueberry topping for dessert.
Try deep dish, in the unlikely event that you never did. I was raised on thin crust, brick oven pizzeria in the NE. I tried some no-knead deep-dish pizza recipe, and all I'll that I can say is ThumbsUp. I first tried it a number of years ago, and I was disappointed; however, I wasn't in Chicago. I tried King Arthur's recipe a few months ago, and I'm now a believer. I used King Arthur's Perfect Pizza Blend flour.It was quite good.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Tonight is a beef stew in the crock pot, salad and rolls. And yes, schlack-I made the stew with cut up red rose potatoes, carrots, onions, sliced mushrooms and parsnips with red wine and a nice thick gravy(American style)! wink


Sounds absolutely terribe!

Planning pan fried (oven finished) duck breasts and wanted to do something fancy to go with them.

The starch will be pre-boiled half new potatoes fried in the duck fat while the meat is resting. Might have to buy in some extra fat for the taters.


Have been dying to try something with agar agar (watching too many masterchefs programmes) and was planning an orange and thyme jelly (orange juice & rind, some lemon juice, sugar and cointreau with some fresh thyme through it). Anyone have any experience doing something like this?

While im sure I'll get that right - eventually - the dish is probably a little dry as planned and will probably make a pan sauce from the duck drippings, but want it to compliment and not overpower the jelly. Any ideas?


Had a delicious meatloaf tonight:

MEATLOAF:

1 1/2 lb. hamburger (lean-extra lean)
1 c. oatmeal
2/3 c. milk or less
2 eggs
1/2 c. onions (optional)
3/4 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper


SAUCE:

3 tbsp. brown sugar
1/4 c. ketchup
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. dry mustard
1/2 tsp. sage

Mix meatloaf ingredients together in separate bowl (by hand works best). Mix sauce ingredients together; spoon works great. Make sure lumps are out and you double the sauce. Pour 1/2 to 3/4 of sauce into meatloaf and mix well. Put meatloaf into 9x5 inch loaf pan and pour remaining sauce on top. Bake 1 hour at 350 degrees. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.
Tonight I'm fixing everything to smoke baby back ribs tomorrow. I'm mixing a dry rub now. Tomorrow morning I'll fire up the smoker and then add 4 hickory chunks and 2 cherry. Then I'll smoke 6 points of pork ribs for about 4 hours, spraying with apple juice at around 3 hours. Just before they are ready I'll baste with Scott's North Carolina Vinegar Sauce. None of that sweet gloppy tomato based sauce for me, though my wife likes that crap. I'll baste her's with mustard based sauce, Carolina Treet or Maurice's Mustard BBQ Sauce from Columbia, South Carolina, or pronounced correctly, "Sou' Kalina."

IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. Pork and or chicken.

Whatever I can't eat I'll just rub all over my face and beard so the aroma will be with me all day. ; )
"IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. "

Die, heathen scum.
Quote:
baby back ribs


Really? I thought North Carolina BBQ was all about whole hog, with all the parts chopped up and mixed together. Never had it myself, but I'd like to try it sometime. I understand it is more moist with higher fat content than pulled pork shoulder because it doesn't get cooked as much.

I prefer Saint Louis cut racks over baby backs, when I smoke up some ribs. I like something I can chew on a little bit, and the baby backs tend to just fall right off the bones and dissolve.
Damnit, still waiting for weather decent enough to smoke up some pork belly!
I really have no preference about what kind of BBQ I have-I love it all! ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Tonight I'm fixing everything to smoke baby back ribs tomorrow. I'm mixing a dry rub now. Tomorrow morning I'll fire up the smoker and then add 4 hickory chunks and 2 cherry. Then I'll smoke 6 points of pork ribs for about 4 hours, spraying with apple juice at around 3 hours. Just before they are ready I'll baste with Scott's North Carolina Vinegar Sauce. None of that sweet gloppy tomato based sauce for me, though my wife likes that crap. I'll baste her's with mustard based sauce, Carolina Treet or Maurice's Mustard BBQ Sauce from Columbia, South Carolina, or pronounced correctly, "Sou' Kalina."

IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. Pork and or chicken.

Whatever I can't eat I'll just rub all over my face and beard so the aroma will be with me all day. ; )

...so what time is dinner again? smile
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Tonight I'm fixing everything to smoke baby back ribs tomorrow. I'm mixing a dry rub now. Tomorrow morning I'll fire up the smoker and then add 4 hickory chunks and 2 cherry. Then I'll smoke 6 points of pork ribs for about 4 hours, spraying with apple juice at around 3 hours. Just before they are ready I'll baste with Scott's North Carolina Vinegar Sauce. None of that sweet gloppy tomato based sauce for me, though my wife likes that crap. I'll baste her's with mustard based sauce, Carolina Treet or Maurice's Mustard BBQ Sauce from Columbia, South Carolina, or pronounced correctly, "Sou' Kalina."

IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. Pork and or chicken.

Whatever I can't eat I'll just rub all over my face and beard so the aroma will be with me all day. ; )

...so what time is dinner again? smile


Rick, pick me up on your way south, before making that left turn to Mick's house! ThumbsUp
Originally Posted By: Ted Remington
"IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. "

Die, heathen scum.


Do I detect a western NC, tomato & honey based glop eating blasphemer?
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Damnit, still waiting for weather decent enough to smoke up some pork belly!



Fly your ass on out, homey. I'll put you up and feed you here in the desert. It's going to be a typical spring day here in the desert. Clear sky, 88 degrees, no humidity and light to moderate gun fire.
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Tonight I'm fixing everything to smoke baby back ribs tomorrow. I'm mixing a dry rub now. Tomorrow morning I'll fire up the smoker and then add 4 hickory chunks and 2 cherry. Then I'll smoke 6 points of pork ribs for about 4 hours, spraying with apple juice at around 3 hours. Just before they are ready I'll baste with Scott's North Carolina Vinegar Sauce. None of that sweet gloppy tomato based sauce for me, though my wife likes that crap. I'll baste her's with mustard based sauce, Carolina Treet or Maurice's Mustard BBQ Sauce from Columbia, South Carolina, or pronounced correctly, "Sou' Kalina."

IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. Pork and or chicken.

Whatever I can't eat I'll just rub all over my face and beard so the aroma will be with me all day. ; )

...so what time is dinner again? smile


Rick, pick me up on your way south, before making that left turn to Mick's house! ThumbsUp


You and Rick, hat up and head out. Dinner will be ready at around 6.30 PM.
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Originally Posted By: california rick
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Tonight I'm fixing everything to smoke baby back ribs tomorrow. I'm mixing a dry rub now. Tomorrow morning I'll fire up the smoker and then add 4 hickory chunks and 2 cherry. Then I'll smoke 6 points of pork ribs for about 4 hours, spraying with apple juice at around 3 hours. Just before they are ready I'll baste with Scott's North Carolina Vinegar Sauce. None of that sweet gloppy tomato based sauce for me, though my wife likes that crap. I'll baste her's with mustard based sauce, Carolina Treet or Maurice's Mustard BBQ Sauce from Columbia, South Carolina, or pronounced correctly, "Sou' Kalina."

IMHO eastern North Carolina BBQ is the original BBQ. Pork and or chicken.

Whatever I can't eat I'll just rub all over my face and beard so the aroma will be with me all day. ; )

...so what time is dinner again? smile


Rick, pick me up on your way south, before making that left turn to Mick's house! ThumbsUp


You and Rick, hat up and head out. Dinner will be ready at around 6.30 PM.

Awesome, leaving now. Scout be ready in 6.0 hours.
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Damnit, still waiting for weather decent enough to smoke up some pork belly!
Fly your ass on out, homey. I'll put you up and feed you here in the desert. It's going to be a typical spring day here in the desert. Clear sky, 88 degrees, no humidity and light to moderate gun fire.

So much for the desert... what's for dessert? (If I left now, I could probably make it for dinner!)
Originally Posted By: Scoutgal
Rick, pick me up on your way south, before making that left turn to Mick's house! ThumbsUp


Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
You and Rick, hat up and head out. Dinner will be ready at around 6.30 PM.

Originally Posted By: california rick
Awesome, leaving now. Scout be ready in 6.0 hours.


Got my travelin' shoes on! laugh
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
baby back ribs


[quote]Really? I thought North Carolina BBQ was all about whole hog, with all the parts chopped up and mixed together. Never had it myself, but I'd like to try it sometime. I understand it is more moist with higher fat content than pulled pork shoulder because it doesn't get cooked as much.


You are correct on all counts. There nothing like cooking a pig in the ground over coals. It is quite a bit of work taking all night and then some and you'll need friend to help you tend the coals and shoveling them into the pit and you'll need help turning the pig over. When it's done you are ready to have a pig pickin' where you get your own meat right of the hog.

The trick is to get some of what is known in NC pig circles as "Mr. Brown", which is outside smoked meat that has turned brown and mix it with lighter inside meat. A lot of people like it chopped. If I'm ordering it at world class pig joints say like Parker's in Wilson, NC I'll order "outside chopped". Most of the time for BBQ sandwiches you are going to get pork shoulder. That's best for sandwiches. It's also standard that you get Carolina cole slaw (usually minced) on top of the meat and then the bun.

If you even attempt to put mustard or ketchup on your BBQ sandwich, the entire restaurant will immediately take you outside and whip your butt. Probably whip your grandmama's butt too if they can find her. So don't do it. wink

There is a higher fat content. And all kidding aside, the truth behind vinegar based sauce is that eastern NC, Tidewater Virginians and Low Country South Carolinians prefer sauce that enhances the flavor of the slow cooked smoked pork. Vinegar sauce enhances the meat all other sauces hide the flavor of the meat.

Quote:
I prefer Saint Louis cut racks over baby backs, when I smoke up some ribs. I like something I can chew on a little bit, and the baby backs tend to just fall right off the bones and dissolve.


Ms. Slipped and I were discussing that very thing last night. She prefers St. Louis cut and she likes sweet glop sauces. Needless to say she didn't grow up down home. However, she will tell you that her favorite BBQ sandwich is from Olde Tyme BBQ in Cary, NC, and oddly enough it's a chopped sandwich with vinegar sauce (no sugar in it) with cole slaw on the top. Go figure.
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Damnit, still waiting for weather decent enough to smoke up some pork belly!
Fly your ass on out, homey. I'll put you up and feed you here in the desert. It's going to be a typical spring day here in the desert. Clear sky, 88 degrees, no humidity and light to moderate gun fire.

So much for the desert... what's for dessert? (If I left now, I could probably make it for dinner!)


Get on over here. Dessert in the desert will be home made Banana Puddin' which is different from Banana Pudding because I leave the "g" out.
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Originally Posted By: logtroll
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Originally Posted By: Schlack
Damnit, still waiting for weather decent enough to smoke up some pork belly!
Fly your ass on out, homey. I'll put you up and feed you here in the desert. It's going to be a typical spring day here in the desert. Clear sky, 88 degrees, no humidity and light to moderate gun fire.

So much for the desert... what's for dessert? (If I left now, I could probably make it for dinner!)


Get on over here. Dessert in the desert will be home made Banana Puddin' which is different from Banana Pudding because I leave the "g" out.


If it's anything like my mom's banana puddin', I will be in Hog Heaven(pun intended)!it was always my job to slice the bananas while my mom made the pudding. It is my grandma's(and her mom's recipe.

I favor the pulled pork sandwich I had at Pig restaurant on Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. They also had real fried pies, which my grandma used to make for us kids.
Fried pies and Memphis BBQ. Oh, lawd! You can't go wrong.
Originally Posted By: Slipped Mickey
Fried pies and Memphis BBQ. Oh, lawd! You can't go wrong.


Nope, and I still make those fried pies! grin
Ever try making barbequed pork fried pies? I have had those at a Dim Sum place. Of course, it was Chinese-style barbeque.
Quote:
she likes sweet glop sauces


I like to use Sweet Baby Ray's brand of sweet glop sauce, but really just to brush on lightly to carmelize on the outsides over the coals at the end of the smoking. I'm always looking for ribs that are a bit crunchy on the outside, and tender and juicy inside. It's a fine line, because a little bit too much heat toasting the outside and you get some very tough and dry areas. I guess I would be asking for some Mr. Brown in my order, too, if I ever get down that way.

I don't need a sauce to add heat, because I make my own dry rub using New Mexico or pasilla ground chili powder instead of paprika. Not very hot, but enough to feel it when you bite into a rib. And it adds more flavor than using paprika plus cayenne.

Quote:
mustard or ketchup on your BBQ sandwich

OMG, what the hell is wrong with some people? Ketchup is for your french fries, and mustard is for sausages.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Quote:
she likes sweet glop sauces


I like to use Sweet Baby Ray's brand of sweet glop sauce, but really just to brush on lightly to carmelize on the outsides over the coals at the end of the smoking. I'm always looking for ribs that are a bit crunchy on the outside, and tender and juicy inside. It's a fine line, because a little bit too much heat toasting the outside and you get some very tough and dry areas. I guess I would be asking for some Mr. Brown in my order, too, if I ever get down that way.

I don't need a sauce to add heat, because I make my own dry rub using New Mexico or pasilla ground chili powder instead of paprika. Not very hot, but enough to feel it when you bite into a rib. And it adds more flavor than using paprika plus cayenne.

Quote:
mustard or ketchup on your BBQ sandwich

OMG, what the hell is wrong with some people? Ketchup is for your french fries, and mustard is for sausages.


I'll tell my wife about Sweet Baby Ray's, thanks.

The ribs turned out great. It took a bit longer this time on the smoker because of the constant wind we are having. It sucks the heat out of the smoker. No problem, I enjoy messing with it.

Yesterday I decided to baste the ribs with mustard and then sprinkle on Dave's Dry Rub. Next I let it sit for about 1 1/2 hours at room temperature before I put it in the smoker on a rib rack. I sprayed the ribs with apple juice after 3 hours. At 4 1/2 hours, I basted them with Scott's sauce (on mine) and Carolina Treet (for my wife). I took the ribs out after 5 hours.

Mighty fine. Both of us were happy with the results. Painting them with mustard, to hold the dry rub, seems to have held in some of the juices, as did the apple spray. They were moist.

IMHO, if you want the eastern NC taste I recommend Scott's BBQ Sauce without reluctance. Carolina Treet gives you the eastern NC taste, but it has a little sugar and little bit of something else in there, for people who like their BBQ with sweetener added - which is probably 99.9% of the known world. Vinegar based sauce without sugar of some kind in it is unique and not to everyone's liking.

Scott's BBQ Sauce

Carolina Treet
Quote:
[wind] sucks the heat out of the smoker


Biggest problem I have with my setup. Our house is out on the end of a west-facing point, with several hundred feet of drop on the slope below us. Anytime we get the slightest bit of air movement, that wind comes up the hill and gets funnelled right past my smoker. It's nice that I never get smoke in my eyes, but very difficult to keep the smoker hot enough.

I usually try to rig up a wind screen with an aluminum ladder and a tarp, but I am seriously considering building a wall on the windward side of my smoker area.
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
Ever try making barbequed pork fried pies? I have had those at a Dim Sum place. Of course, it was Chinese-style barbeque.


Yes! Love them, although I like the BBQ pork in steamed buns(cha shu bao) the best.