Capitol Hill Blue
Posted By: pdx rick What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 12:23 AM


Sunday, April 5th 2020

  • Chicken Cacciatore
  • - Chopped tomatoes, garlic, tumaric, sweet onion, Chardonnay, mushrooms, sliced bell peppers
  • - Egg noodles
  • - Oven "fried" chicken
  • - Chopped italian parsley as garnish
  • Spinach Salad
  • - chopped egg
  • - sliced mushrooms
  • - chopped bacon
  • - warm Paul Newman's Family Italian Dressing


smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 01:28 AM
Fettucini Alfredo with mussels and grilled asparagus.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 01:38 AM
Homemade lasagna and salad.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 03:07 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
Fettucini Alfredo with mussels and grilled asparagus.

I love grilled asparagus!!! smile
Posted By: Ujest Shurly Re: What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 11:32 AM
Sunday: Meat Loaf, mashed potatoes, brussels sprouts, gravy. Good old homemade fair.

Saturday: Italian Take Out - Penne Lobster; in a dolce vita mixed tossed in a brandy creamy tomato sauce, Shrimp Cremosi, salad.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/06/20 05:52 PM
In these dreary lonely times we should never forget the most important meal of the day...

Breakfast!



Cajun style shrimp and grits, eggs laid this morning, homemade bread fried in garlic infused olive oil.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/07/20 12:29 AM
Bean soup with ham. Just printed out a recipe, so we don't forget anything.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/07/20 04:12 AM
BLT tonight. I'm rationing tomatoes so it was a glorious splurge.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/07/20 08:12 AM
I remember tomatoes. Sigh... We are trying to stick to canned stuff from the pantry until I can get some antibody tests to make sure we are safe. Still have a lot of corned beef hash and chile. Why the hell didn't I buy some beef stew! Getting real damned tired of corned beef hash and chile.

We can actually buy a bunch of stuff and have it delivered to the porch, where it would stay for a few days. But my wife is extra careful. Refrigerator is on it's last legs, too. Lucky we have a new little dorm room style fridge as well we have fired up. I'm going to miss the ice maker.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/07/20 11:51 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
In these dreary lonely times we should never forget the most important meal of the day...

Breakfast!



Cajun style shrimp and grits, eggs laid this morning, homemade bread fried in garlic infused olive oil.

Chez Greger's

You could probably charge $22.00 for that meal. smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/09/20 01:28 AM
Pork chop sandwich, Ritz crackers with guacamole, and a pickle spear.

Black coffee.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/09/20 01:47 AM
Cooked a turkey on the Charbeque last night, had that with mashed taters n gravy and a salad tonight.

A CO2 drawdown dinner!
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/09/20 06:43 AM
Went on Walmart.com today and was stunned to see my local store has no-contact delivery to your porch! I reserved a time slot for Saturday, and then proceeded to order about $200 dollars of staples and canned goods. Then I went to pay and Chase denied my transaction. I called Chase and got them to allow it. Went back to Walmart and tried to pay again but they claimed my security code did not match. (It did.) Then they said my delivery time slot was no longer available and they had none left for today or tomorrow. They would not even give me the option of Saturday, and said try tomorrow.

They actually changed their website while I was ordering! Nice. At least Home Depot accepted my order for a new fridge delivered on April 15th. We'll see if they can actually do it. Won't have any food to put in it, but it would be nice to go in the kitchen and not hear death throes from the appliances.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/09/20 03:30 PM
Woke up at 5 AM to get in the morning phone queue with Walmart grocery customer support. (7 AM Central Time) A very nice lady helped me pay for my order and schedule a pickup on Sunday. Which is very convenient because I will go there in a pickup truck, so they can put my gigantic order in the back.

Now the question is how much do you tip a guy for shopping for you and bringing it out to your truck? I am also rather curious about exactly what they will give me. Several of their website items sold out while I was ordering. They probably get more in by Sunday. I also checked the "substitute similar items" box. It's sort of grocery roulette. I hope I don't get canned asparagus. I hate that stuff, although I love fresh asparagus steamed with butter. Have not found sacks of flour and yeast anywhere yet.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/09/20 04:44 PM
King Arthur Flour is still shipping as far as I know. Amazon might have it too. I had just opened a 1 pound bag of yeast and stocked up on flour before this all turned into a nightmare.
The lack of yeast has started a huge sourdough craze, but sourdough requires a lot of feeding so the discards will eventually eat into your supply of flour. They make great pancakes though.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/10/20 11:22 PM

Nicoise Salad
  • Romaine lettuce
  • - Paul Newman's Itailian Family Dressing with a tablespoon of dijon mustard
  • - 1/4 tsp of shallots
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Blanched whole green beans
  • Flaked white tuna
  • Red potatoes
  • Kalamata olives
  • Sliced hard-cooked egg


smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/10/20 11:52 PM
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/10/20 11:57 PM
I'm thawing out some soup I had in the freezer from happier days.

I'm hoping the flavour of better times will come through.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/10/20 11:59 PM

What is dinosaur leg? Hmm
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 12:25 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
King Arthur Flour is still shipping as far as I know. Amazon might have it too.

Not available on Amazon.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 12:28 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
I'm thawing out some soup I had in the freezer from happier days.

I'm hoping the flavour of better times will come through.

We've still got four days of mashed taters, spinach, and turkey. More lasagna in the freezer after that.

No shortage of eggs - still giving most of them away to neighbors.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 01:05 AM
Originally Posted By: pdx rick

What is dinosaur leg? Hmm

I have no idea, possibly some sort of large Australian bird?
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 01:19 AM
KIng Arthur doesn't have any either.

Looks like I'm rationing that too. I can mix in some older AP flour and white wheat I've got laying around to stretch the bread flour. I've got a full 5 pounds of White Lily self rising flour. But that's best used for scones and such. It's soft winter wheat and the protein is so low that it's practically gluten free.

There's a few blueberries ripening so blueberry scones might become the bread ration for a few days.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 01:28 AM
Quote:
No shortage of eggs - still giving most of them away to neighbors.

My little flock is perfectly balanced right now. They produce exactly how many I use. I very rarely get a dozen ahead and I never ever run out.

Have you tried making raamen eggs Loggy, it's great having those in the fridge because they're good with everything. Basically a soft boiled egg pickled in Mirin and soy sauce. The yolk turns into jammy wonderfulness.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 01:37 AM
I will give that a try...
Posted By: Hamish Howl Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 01:50 AM
I just made a sandwich out of General Tso's Chicken, and my wife is looking at me like I'm a barbarian.

What? It's not even real Chinese food. It's the hot dog of Asian cuisine.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 12:53 PM
I got me a hankerin fer some possum stew...

Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 05:51 PM
As game meats go, 'possum is surprisingly good. The fat is sweet and not gamey like raccoons or squirrels. Armadillo is excellent too if you live in a region where they are plentiful. Gopher turtles, though difficult to butcher and extremely illegal to harvest now, were once a staple here. Alligator isn't especially good to eat but they are plentiful and similar to wild pork.
Snakes are starting to crawl now too as the weather warms up and a good fat rattlesnake will provide a lot of protein.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 06:43 PM
We have a great resource here in the local feed store. They are driving 9 hours to bring in chicks and have a waiting list 100 deep for people who want them. People are coming in from LA to buy them. I'm not sure what parts of LA lets you raise chickens, but everybody wants to be self-sufficient now. Their list is so long, my wife is considering ducks. Apparently, there are some breeds that lay almost every day and just walk away from their nests. So you don't have to fight them for their eggs. I keep telling her she has to plant a garden and protect it from the dogs and coyotes before we get chickens. Ducks need that plus a pond, too.

I wonder what duck eggs taste like?
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 07:09 PM
Just like chicken eggs.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 07:09 PM


Saturday April 11, 2020

  • Stuffed Bell Peppers
  • - Bell Peppers
  • - Brown Rice
  • - Ground Lean Beef
  • - Grilled Asparagus
  • - Cherry Tomatoes
  • - Garlic
  • - Onions
  • - Cheddar Cheese
smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 07:44 PM
I think you're crazy not to have chickens if you can have them. I get more than half my protein from eggs, they contain all nine essential amino acids and a bevy of vitamins and nutrients.

When I move to town the first thing I'll do is build a chicken coop, most towns allow small flocks now as long as certain requirements are met. No roosters though...I'll miss roosters...said no one ever.

All ya gotta do is fence them off a section and build or buy a coop.

If they have enough room to forage you hardly even have to feed them

Chickens are probably like toilet paper right now. My chicken lady usually has daily offerings but her Facebook has gone quiet.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 07:56 PM
Rick, do you plan your meals out like a lunchlady?

I have no idea yet what I'm having but I think it's gona be fried chicken, or maybe just a salad...

Or maybe...a fried chicken salad!



With bacon.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/11/20 09:55 PM
I spoke too soon about my chicken lady. She says...

Originally Posted By: A Fowl Business
We have three week old female chicks! Easter Eggers, Olive Eggers, Polish (including frizzle), Mille Fleur d'Uccles (including frizzle), Blue Andalusians and Cochingtons. Boys too.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 05:54 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
Rick, do you plan your meals out like a lunchlady?

Naw mang...like yesterday, I woke up and Nicoise salad came to mind. And I thought...sounds good for dinner. Hmm

smile
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 06:00 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
...but I think it's gona be fried chicken, or maybe just a salad...

I pulled some chicken out of the freezer today, but it wouldn't be thawed until tomorrow night (Sunday) for dinner.

So I needed to think fo something for tonight's meal, and I happened by the frozen section at the store today, I saw the Stouffers stuffed bell peppers and I thought I could do that and make it myself.

I pulled up the recipe on my new smart phone while at the store, saw a Food Network recipe and started following that. The Food Network recipe called for zucchini and I knew I had asparagus in the 'fridge at home, so I would sub grilled asp for zucchini.

I was inspired by Ina Garten being on News Hour last night when she said to use whatever you have in the 'fridge and pantry and don't be scared to make substitutions.

...and now you know the rest of the story. smile
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 02:10 PM
Originally Posted By: Greger
Rick, do you plan your meals out like a lunchlady?

My Momma, rest her soul, was a lunch lady, too.

Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 03:19 PM
Quote:
If they have enough room to forage you hardly even have to feed them

That's why I want to put in a vegetable garden, so the chickens have some place to forage. We get plenty of bugs here. Might as well have something that can convert them to useful protein. Serendipity! The only thing I would not like is killing them when they retire from laying. I killed far too many animals back when I worked in medical research. Now, I don't even kill spiders I find in the house. Besides, I get Foster Farms chicken breasts for $0.99 / lb on sale and put a pile in the freezer after cooking. So I don't really need the meat. I get eggs for <$1 / dozen at Aldi's so chickens may not pencil out. Thanks for the scoop on duck eggs, Greger.

Dinner last night: Cleaning out the freezer because the fridge is failing slowly. Freezer has stopped making ice and I notice the stuff is starting to get a bit soft. New refrigerator delivered on Wednesday. Meanwhile I had a big smoked sausage with barbeque sauce and saurkraut, and stringbeans on the side.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 04:02 PM
Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
...stringbeans on the side.

Stringbeans were part of the Nicoise salad I made on Friday. I blanched the stringbeans in hot water for 4 mins, then cooled immediately with running cold water. They came out slightly firm and really sweet.

smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/12/20 06:18 PM
Quote:
That's why I want to put in a vegetable garden, so the chickens have some place to forage.
You gotta fence 'em out of the vegetable garden! They'll strip every plant to bare stems. They don't just eat bugs y'know! It's like letting your foxes in the henhouse to forage.

Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 12:04 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
Quote:
That's why I want to put in a vegetable garden, so the chickens have some place to forage.
You gotta fence 'em out of the vegetable garden! They'll strip every plant to bare stems. They don't just eat bugs y'know! It's like letting your foxes in the henhouse to forage.

It is good to have them in the garden before you plant it. If you've mulched the area they will scratch it all in and eat all the bugs living in the mulch.

It takes a lot of area to keep them fed without additional feed. We have a pretty large lot with about 1/4 acre in non-built condition. They (6 hens) have it clean as a whistle after about six months. Even the rather large compost heap they worked through in short order. Now, whenever we are in the yard they are underfoot hoping we'll turn over a rock or something. And they talk, talk, talk all the time. Pretty enjoyable, if you're inclined that way.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 01:02 AM
The hens always need Layena available, it's laced with oyster shell to replace the calcium they lose making eggshells. I feed all the eggshells back to them too. Other than that I toss out corn twice a day for "treats". Squirrels eat most of it but they're kind of fun to have around too. My chickens roam free and spend most of their time scratching for bugs in the leaf litter in the woods.

By the way...Amazon has flour but only in 50 pound bags. They got yeast too.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 01:04 AM
Spaggy and Merbles!
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 07:04 AM
I have some flour and yeast on order for Wednesday pickup. Did you know there is enough yeast on wheat kernels that you can easily culture it. That's how sourdough starters work. You can also culture it from grapes or even raisins: That's why the black surfaces have a dusty coating. It's wild yeast. You just throw a few raisins in a sourdough starter culture and it's ready to use in a few days. You do have to remove a cup of starter and feed it another cup of flour, sugar, and water every day (or once a week in the fridge). The cup of starter you removed is perfect for making a loaf or two of bread.

It does require some attention on a regular basis, but the feeding process encourages you to make the bread. Otherwise you feel like a bad parent if you just trash the starter you removed.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 12:03 PM

Sunday, April 12, 2020
  • Oven "Fried" Chicken
  • - Panko crumbs, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, chicken in a egg/milk bath cooked at 400F for one hour
  • Baked potato
  • Steamed broccoli
smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 05:52 PM
Quote:
Did you know there is enough yeast on wheat kernels that you can easily culture it.

Not if your flour has been bleached or bromated. Use King Arthur flour.

I've done the sourdough thing and it's a f*cking pain in the ass. I've been baking my own bread for more years than I can remember and it's a process you want to streamline as much as possible. Otherwise it will get to be a chore and you'll stop doing it.

Most people bake a few sh*tty loaves and give up. My everyday bread is as easy to make as a pot of coffee and turns out an excellent white loaf in whatever shape I choose. Gluten free bread isn't bread but it can be made to closely resemble it. Not by me though.

Yeast lasts for years so buy it by the pound. I keep it in a mason jar in the fridge.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/13/20 10:58 PM
As I said, on wheat kernels. Not on every flour, but I always prefer unbleached. I wish I could buy a big jar of yeast, but everybody is sold out around here. I got 20 pounds on order for tomorrow. Let's see if they actually have any in the store when they fill my order.

I really prefer yeast breads to soda breads. I can always taste the chemical nastiness of the baking powder.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/14/20 04:03 AM
I usually buy 2 pounds of yeast at a time. there's 2 1/2 cups of yeast in a pound. It last a long ass time.
If a person was running short, the no knead artisan bread only uses a quarter teaspoon. I don't care for it much though. It's got a hard crust and a weird crumb. I love the taste though, the long fermentation makes it taste great.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/14/20 12:17 PM
"no knead" sounds good. What's the recipe you use? One thing I have plenty of is time.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/16/20 09:45 PM
Top of my head it's three cups of AP flour, a cup and a half of water 1 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp yeast.

whisk the dry ingredients together and add the water, mix into a shaggy dough then put a lid on it and let it sit 18 hours, I do it in a big plastic bowl but I don't quite seal the lid so it can still breathe.

Next day you take it out and flour it so it can be handled because it's a wet sticky dough. You don't hafta knead it but to effectively make a nice cob loaf you need to stretch the corners out and fold them back in a few times to develop the gluten and form some tension within the loaf. Allow a couple hours for it to rise before the next step.

To bake it they want you to preheat a cast iron dutch oven to 450, pull that hot muther Phucker outa the oven and plop your risen dough into, and put it back in the oven and reduce the heat and something something.

It makes a super crusty loaf that requires a good bread knife to cut/saw into slices. The crumb(that's the inside of the loaf) is an unusual rustic texture that leaves a sticky residue on the knife.

It's absolutely delicious crusty rustic chewy crunchy bread that our ancestors for a thousand years ate every day. Baked in an iron pot over a fire. It's great with soups and stews and with winey cheesy stuff, but it aint everyday bread.
This method is probably adaptable to some gluten free recipes, I wouldn't know but it seems like...
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/18/20 09:24 PM
My raisin yeast culture is coming along. Some raisins are floating. No bubbles yet.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/18/20 11:53 PM

Saturday, April 18, 2020

  • Oven "Fried" Chicken
  • - Panko crumbs, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, chicken in a egg/milk bath cooked at 400F for one hour
  • Mashed red pots
  • -Butter, Sour Cream, 2% milk
  • Grilled Asparagus
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/19/20 12:08 AM
Sounds like strange science to me. Here's loaf of everyday bread.

Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/19/20 12:33 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
Sounds like strange science to me. Here's loaf of everyday bread.


Looks like a giant, tan, blind slug. Great hot with a pat of butter.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/19/20 03:17 AM
Snails are good hot with a pat of butter too.

I can make them prettier but there's no point, it's just everyday bread. Soft white bread with a soft crust.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/20/20 01:24 AM


Sunday, April 19, 2020

  • Tacos
  • - Crispy Corn Shell
  • - Ground seasoned 93% beef
  • - Chopped greens (spinach leaves, romaine lettus
  • - sliced cherry tomatoes
  • - Shredded sharp cheddar
smile
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/20/20 02:20 AM
I make my tacos a little different:

Pan-fried tortilla taco shells
Carnitas or beer battered fish filet
Feta cheese
avocado slices or guacamole if it's already made
mild salsa
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 02:43 AM
I opened a can of soup and made a salad.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 02:47 AM
fish stick tacos are da bomb!
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 03:00 AM


Fish stick tacos with coleslaw sounds good. smile
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 03:00 AM


Monday, April 20, 2020

Left overs Hmm
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 03:47 AM
Pork, mushroom, veggie shishkeboobs grilled on the Charbecue!
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 04:01 AM
I prefer the beer-battered frozen fish filets, like Gorton's. I cook them up and then slice them into thirds length-wise to go into the tacos. And coleslaw if it's already made, or just raw sliced cabbage. As good as Rubio's, and I've been eating their fish tacos since they only had one taco stand.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/21/20 04:04 AM
Tonight is beer brats, saurkraut, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

I'm very happy: Just ordered a pound of yeast coming on Friday.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/22/20 01:07 AM

Tuesday, April 21, 2021
  • Chicken Cacciatore
  • - Chopped tomatoes, garlic, tumaric, sweet onion, Chardonnay, mushrooms, sliced bell peppers
  • - Egg noodles
  • - Oven "fried" chicken
  • - Chopped italian parsley as garnish
  • Sauteed brussels sprouts


smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/22/20 03:19 AM
Panko crusted porkchop, pan seared tomatoes and brussels sprouts, salat.

Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 04/22/20 04:24 AM

When is Chez Greger's opening again? If you were in Georgia, it would next Monday. crazy

Georgia = Home of human crash test dummies. coffee
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/23/20 02:42 AM
Chez Mark's Kitchen is always open. My clientele has shrunk dramatically though. I used to be able to count on as many as nine lesbian teens over the weekends and the whole extended coven over the Sabats. Only the old pellar stops by now asking for handouts.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/23/20 03:09 AM
Ritz crackers with pimento cheese, black coffee.

Two blueberry Eggos for desert.

It was a rationing day.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/23/20 04:05 AM
Beer brat with Jack cheese and mustard, in a hot flour tortilla. Coconut pudding and strawberries for dessert.

Had avocado chunks on Ritz crackers for lunch. We are very fortunate to have a few avocado trees ourselves, and an elderly neighbor with an orchard her husband planted long before he died. We get all the small avocados and nice cherimoyas we want. We also have an orange tree that has a lot of sweet oranges on it all year round.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/24/20 05:35 AM
My yeast arrived a day early from Utah, and this morning we found a bit of flour (5 lb max per customer) at the grocery store at 7 AM. So I am just eating my first slices of bread from my bread machine. Yum!

Nice to have the bread & toast option again after about a month without.

My wife sewed some high-quality masks yesterday. These are double-layer cloth with a filter insert pocket. That's why we have not gone into the grocery store until now. When you have to reserve a late pickup time slot, they are out of a lot of stuff you wanted.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/25/20 02:58 AM
I use a bread machine for mixing and kneading but I like to shape the loaf and bake it myself. I dropped close to $400 on groceries today. I forgot Buttermilk at Publix so I hadda swing by the poor people's store. I got the buttermilk and some chicken paws and pork tails. They had all sorts of wonderfoul Q-Rations! Canned pulled pork, can you imagine that? It's pretty good and there's enough for two sandwiches in the can. The chicken paws are for making bone broth, lots of collagen. After I simmer them for 24 hours I feed them to the chickens. The dog gets the pork tails.

I got five pounds of store brand flour. I find that I'm not snooty at all about flour when there's only one bag on the shelf.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/25/20 07:39 PM
Five bags on my grocery store shelf. Put two in the cart, but a guy restocking said one per household. It's general purpose, but actually has 10% protein, so it's almost bread flour. Makes a nice dense loaf that's easy to slice without tearing it up.

Had my first chicken salad sandwich in over a month yesterday.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/25/20 09:37 PM
There isn't a huge difference between bread and AP flour, both will bake bread, one isn't so good for pancakes. If you're just letting the bread machine do it's thing it won't matter a bit, the extra gluten comes in handy when you're shaping the loaf and building tension in it to make it pop. The spinner in the bread machine does it perfectly if you just leave it alone and let it bake the bread.

But I don't like those loaves, mostly I want a nice fat 18-20 inch loaf of French bread. A loaf that resembles a slug, or sometimes a manatee. A loaf that I can get a f*ck ton of slices from but a little too small for sandwiches.

You ever toss in a handfull of chopped dehydrated onions? If not DO IT! you might need to add an ounce of water but it makes great soft oniony bread.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/28/20 11:03 PM
Wish I had some of those onions, but all I have is onion powder. I have enjoyed onion bread before. I do have sunflower seeds, raisins, and flax meal. My wife is wheat intolerant, so I also have a bunch of weird stuff like almond flour.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/28/20 11:25 PM
I just put eight burgers in the sous vide with one side coated with the dehydrated chopped onions. They re-hydrate in the SV and I can make a pretty good imitation of a White Castle burger.

Pasteurized in the bag, they keep for weeks in the bottom drawer of the fridge.

Burgers and fries tonight with a salad...F*cking chicken got in the house and ruined all my tomatoes!
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 04/28/20 11:31 PM
Originally Posted By: Greger
F*cking chicken got in the house and ruined all my tomatoes!

What kind of a chicken?

We just got six new chicks. My wife's favorite chicken, a Cochin, suddenly got sick a week ago and died, which left is with five (Town code allows four). She was so distraught that she over-over compensated. The new chicks are in a tub in the bathroom under a heat lamp, rapidly turning into chickens. The neighbors are begging for eggs...
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 04/29/20 01:47 AM
Rhode Island Red. I generally go for the prolific layers, Blue Star hybrids are my favorite. I use two-three dozen a week. Neighbors can get there own god damn chickens.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 04/30/20 04:10 AM
I really like those Rhode Island Red's brown eggs. They just seem to taste better.

Made some chicken salad tonight with canned chicken breast. Surprisingly good. You probably don't notice the nasty texture of the canned chicken when you mash it up with celery and mayo. On Ritz crackers it was outstanding. My wife made us some canned broccoli-cheese soup with fresh potatoes added. That was nice too.

Tomorrow, I will make potato salad with the extra potatoes.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 05/01/20 12:19 AM
Blue Star hybrids are a cross between Barred Plymouth Rock and Rhode Island Reds. They lay a slightly larger egg and tons of them.

As far a flavor goes an egg's an egg's an egg. The flavor depends entirely on what they eat. Nutrition wise a pastured hen that can graze freely is far superior to a battery hen or cooped birds.

Honey Sriracha Chicken with rice and stir fried veggies.
Posted By: GreatNewsTonight Re: What's for dinner? - 05/17/20 12:13 AM
Today was our anniversary. My amazing wife cooked a meal worthy of a Michelin-starred restaurant. It was simply delicious; professional chefs would have been envious.

Garden salad with herbs, from her hydroponic garden.
Maigret de canard with risotto alla piemontese and banana au gratin with crme frache (the dish is a sort of French/Italian combination of her own creation)
Condensed milk and dark chocolate-covered organic strawberries

The wine was an Argentinian Malbec called Tapiz, rated 94 by James Suckling.

I love this woman...





Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 05/17/20 12:28 AM


Breakfast for dinner:
  • Blueberry pancakes made from Bisquick



smile
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 05/17/20 09:04 PM
Wow! Canard = duck, for the less European. Looks fantastic. I've got some cherry tomato and butter lettuce seeds coming. Have not seen any way to buy lettuce and decontaminate it. I can do hydroponic or just grow them in enriched soil. I also have peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, string beans, and pea seeds coming. Grown them all before. I can do it again.

Had a very nice passionfruit vine a few years ago, until the gophers got it. We actually sold some to a packing house. Still have a few avocados and an orange tree. Neighbor lets us pick her unused avocados and cherimoya. That cherimoya is fantastic, though few Americans even know what it is.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 05/18/20 05:56 PM
GNT: That's a lovely duck breast! I'm jealous because I can't get them around here and have to break down a whole bird if I want just the breast.

Texas style smoked brisket, grilled asparugus, fried gnochi.

Peach cobbler for dessert made from U-Pick peaches just up the road.

Years ago I lost/forgot the recipe for the cobbler I grew up with. I've tried dozens of recipes since then and have never been able to duplicate it. A litle while back, this came through my newsfeed...

This is it folks! What cobbler was meant to be!
Posted By: GreatNewsTonight Re: What's for dinner? - 05/20/20 02:16 AM
Originally Posted By: Greger
GNT: That's a lovely duck breast! I'm jealous because I can't get them around here and have to break down a whole bird if I want just the breast.

Texas style smoked brisket, grilled asparugus, fried gnochi.

Peach cobbler for dessert made from U-Pick peaches just up the road.

Years ago I lost/forgot the recipe for the cobbler I grew up with. I've tried dozens of recipes since then and have never been able to duplicate it. A litle while back, this came through my newsfeed...

This is it folks! What cobbler was meant to be!


Yes, that duck breast was just delicious and my wife got it just right, medium rare inside, and crispy and spicy outside.

This cobbler looks yummy!
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 05/21/20 02:34 AM
If you love duck let me tell you about something wonderful...

Rotisserie duck. Possibly the most rich and decadent fowl on the planet.

That cobbler ranks high on that scale too, I used French butter and soft winter wheat maybe a little past it's prime. But it's a depression era recipe.

Right now I've got some split pigs feet simmering with lots of onions and jalapenos and garlics and such in a rich bone broth I made a while back. It's turning into a vaguely Mexicanesque pork based French onion soup. I'll pick the meat from the feet and make little street tacos. Wish I had an avocado.
Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 05/21/20 04:49 PM
Originally Posted By: Greger

Peach cobbler for dessert made from U-Pick peaches just up the road.

Years ago I lost/forgot the recipe for the cobbler I grew up with. I've tried dozens of recipes since then and have never been able to duplicate it. A litle while back, this came through my newsfeed...

This is it folks! What cobbler was meant to be!


Our neighbor's peach tree, which "suffers" from benign neglect, hangs over the wall and it currently has what I estimate to be about twenty pounds of small peaches and I am having difficulty getting my wife and daughter excited about the prospect of peach pie and peach cobbler.

Maybe I should ask you to move in with me and put Karen and Bri down in Florida.

Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 05/21/20 08:51 PM
I'd have them motherf*ckers off the tree and in the oven so fast your head would spin. Typically those little peaches are super sweet and juicy!
Other than pealing the peaches this recipe is fantastic even for the novice cook. Thin skinned peaches can just be cut up without even peeling them. It can be made from drained canned peaches too.

Jeffery I can guarantee you...if you make the cobbler they will come.
It smells fabulous while it bakes, the chewy crunchy top is what dreams are made of and the dough soaks up all the wonderful peachy goodness that will take you back to the sweetest peaches and sweetest spring times of your life.

Cobbler is properly served warm with Ice cream. It's great left over but once it's covered it loses the crunchy top. I can eat a whole one in three days.
Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 05/21/20 10:44 PM
Originally Posted By: Greger
I'd have them motherf*ckers off the tree and in the oven so fast your head would spin. Typically those little peaches are super sweet and juicy!
Other than pealing the peaches this recipe is fantastic even for the novice cook. Thin skinned peaches can just be cut up without even peeling them. It can be made from drained canned peaches too.

Jeffery I can guarantee you...if you make the cobbler they will come.
It smells fabulous while it bakes, the chewy crunchy top is what dreams are made of and the dough soaks up all the wonderful peachy goodness that will take you back to the sweetest peaches and sweetest spring times of your life.

Cobbler is properly served warm with Ice cream. It's great left over but once it's covered it loses the crunchy top. I can eat a whole one in three days.


The only reason I know ANYTHING about raising peaches or picking them is because of my crazy ex.



Linda grew up on the family farm, which happened to include the largest and most productive peach orchard on the East Coast. (Pennsylvania bordering with Maryland) and they provided fruit for something like twelve different supermarket chains up and down the Eastern US.

The farm is still a productive farm today, but the crazy ex-wife passed away about four years ago.
These are Yellow Freestone peaches, which are common to the Western US even though they can be grown almost any place you can grow peaches.

I used the term "benign neglect" because the neighbor doesn't water the tree or otherwise do much of anything, but perhaps the only penalty is the size of the peaches because that also means these lovely gems are as organic as it gets and free of all pesticides.

I'm going to start picking them tomorrow smile

Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 05/22/20 01:20 AM
I really love her peaches wanna shake her tree......
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 05/22/20 12:41 PM
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
I really love her peaches wanna shake her tree......

Hey! I remember you! You're Maurice, the Space Cowboy.

Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 05/22/20 08:52 PM
Originally Posted By: Ken Condon
I really love her peaches wanna shake her tree......


Trust me, it was a really really bad choice that I made. ROTFMOL
I'm surprised I even still like peaches!
Posted By: GreatNewsTonight Re: What's for dinner? - 05/24/20 08:18 PM
My amazing wife cooked today a seafood linguini (home-made pasta) with clams, shrimp, crab meat, calamari, and scallops, in a half-tomato, half fresh cream peppery sauce. This puts any good Italian restaurant to shame. We had a Prosecco Superiore with it. Dessert was a home-make coconut cake with freshly melted and warm dark chocolate.





This was to celebrate the reopening of our swimming pool, just in time for Memorial Day.



Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 12:30 AM
SA 10/23/21

Figgy Thyme Pork Chops w/ garlic mashed & roasted carrots and onions


[Linked Image from uploads.disquscdn.com]



smile
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 01:05 AM
I don't think I have ever had roasted onions before. They were really good. smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 02:14 AM
Try roasting whole garlic heads. ya just squeeze out the goodness from each clove and spread it on crispy french bread or anything really!
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 02:18 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Try roasting whole garlic heads. ya just squeeze out the goodness from each clove and spread it on crispy french bread or anything really!
I have had roasted garlic head before. It IS tasty! In fact, sweet and tasty. I like to have it with a tomato chutney and some cambazola cheese.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 03:40 AM
I harvested my garlic crop in August and it been drying and curing in the garage since. Its time to select the largest healthy looking clove and plant them for next years crop tomorrow. The rest will be stored dry and cool until each of them goes to it's final reward. They all hope to end up in the pesto grin, known around here as green crack! Yum, but reek like a leek for a week grin

Tat
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 09:40 AM
Lap cheong Chinese sausage (from Costco), white rice, and home made coleslaw. A little teriyaki sauce on the rice. A bit of celery seed on the slaw. Yum!
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 11:32 AM
Why not brown rice? More nutrients and fiber because you get the whole kernel? Hmm
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 11:33 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
I harvested my garlic crop in August and it been drying and curing in the garage since. Its time to select the largest healthy looking clove and plant them for next years crop tomorrow. The rest will be stored dry and cool until each of them goes to it's final reward. They all hope to end up in the pesto grin, known around here as green crack! Yum, but reek like a leek for a week grin
Sounds de-lish! I'm jelly. Bow
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 03:56 PM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
Why not brown rice? More nutrients and fiber because you get the whole kernel? Hmm
He's clearly a white ricest!

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 04:34 PM
I cooked black rice for the first time last night. Black rice contains high levels of seven different antho­cyanin polyphenols...antioxidents.

I made a mushroom and shallot risotto seasoned with hyssop and sumac(za'atar).

served that with homemade hummus and Lay's Ruffles potato chips.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 04:59 PM
Originally Posted by Greger
I made a mushroom and shallot risotto seasoned with hyssop and sumac(za'atar)..
THAT part of the meal sounds so de-lish! smile

I ordred a Mushroom & Thyme Risotto with Parmesan from the meal kit company for November 18th. smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 06:13 PM
Originally Posted by Greger
I cooked black rice for the first time last night. Black rice contains high levels of seven different antho­cyanin polyphenols...antioxidents.

I made a mushroom and shallot risotto seasoned with hyssop and sumac(za'atar).

served that with homemade hummus and Lay's Ruffles potato chips.

I have a bag of black rice, but when boiled it turns everything very black. A risotto solves that problem by absorbing all the black tint with the antioxidant goodies that would otherwise go away with Blackwater. Does it take much longer to rosottoize the black rice? Any tips on process would be helpful. I also have a bag of sumac that I have not used for lack of a good idea for it, so may try it like this.

I make lots of hummus for eating with fresh raw veggies, and whatever gets roasted when they are getting a bit long in the tooth. I also spread humus on bread like mayo for tomato sandwiches when mine are in season, which SOB, they are no longer!
,
What goes in your hummus other than tahini , garlic, lemon, S+P, and olyve oil? Mine, depending on who will be eating it, includes more garlic, cumin, turmeric for color, a dash of citric acid for more tartness, and pepper flakes for hot! I try to use dry garbanzos, but I do keep large cans around for impulse hummus attacks!
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 07:03 PM
I make my own tahini which is essentially just ground up sesame seeds with olive oil. But I toast them first in a Dutch oven by spreading them in a thin layer and keep shaking them as they toast over medium high heat. Careful not to burn them though as burnt sesame seeds taste horrible. But toasted ones taste awesome in the hummus! Then mix them with the garbanzos and a whole roasted garlic bulb. Throw in some lemon juice little salt some more oil as needed and there you go for a great hummus.
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 07:05 PM
I haven’t tried the turmeric and cumin but that sounds good.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 07:12 PM
I keep the hummus basic but usually squirt a dollop of Sriracha on top before I dig in.

and I don't peel the garbanzos.

I struggle to eat enough legumes and I eat far too many chips so if I combine the two my worst dietary inclinations are made somewhat healthier.

This was my first go-round with black rice so I'm not going to offer any advice. It takes a long time, it's chewy and it's not a handy processed white carb that soaks up gravy. I cooked it in stock, poured off some of the liquid, added a shallot and some mushrooms, a dollop of cream and some Lebanese za'atar, then let it cook down and tenderize a bit more. It was quite lovely.
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 07:50 PM
What about saffron rice? I love that stuff but it needs to be made with white rice or it doesn’t taste right. I eat more brown rice than white rice but I make an exception sometimes, especially for saffron rice. First I sauté some chopped up onions then add in the white rice, usually Jasmine, add some chicken stock and some saffron threads and there you go.

I love the flavor of saffron. I guess you could say I’m just mad about saffron.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 08:33 PM
We eat a lot of brown and wild rice, but certain Asian dishes just work better with white rice. My wife is from Hawaii, so we do like the "locals" when we make their meals. ("Locals" here meaning Hawaiian locals.) We always use white rice for loco moko, too: That's the simplest dish possible, but quite tasty: Hamburger patty over white rice, smothered in beef gravy and topped with a sunny-side up egg. It's the Hawaiian equivalent of poutine: Quick, cheap, tasty, and filling.

My wife is wheat-intolerant, so we eat a lot of wheat alternatives. Potatoes, rice, corn tortillas, etc. A lot of Progresso soups are wheat-free, but they no longer print "gluten-free" on the labels. You have to read the ingredient list.
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 09:26 PM
Loco moco was originally invented in Hilo. I was born and raised on Oahu but we would go to the big Island often and I ultimately lived in Hilo for five years in my early 20s. Hilo was the first place I ever had a loco but they soon spread to the other islands.

Not exactly health food but satisfying in a pinch.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 09:53 PM
Yeah they describe it as aggressively comforting food, clutching chest pain. tonbricks Might as well do your self in with Chicken Fried Steak with Red Eye "Gravy"!
Or you could do this to work it off!


Without using the google machine, who wrote it? grin
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 09:59 PM
SU 10/24/21

Crispy Blue Cheese Chicken w/ bacon 'n' Chive Mashed potatoes and roasted broccoli.

smile
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 10:03 PM
I know a Little Eva first had a hit with it way back when. But I think it’s unlikely she wrote it.
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 10:09 PM
I love chicken fried steak. A guilty sin. I think a Loco Moco made with a chicken fried steak instead of a hamburger would be awesome.

Just do it!
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 10:13 PM
Just use a mushroom gravy and then it would become healthy. wink
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 11:09 PM
Yeah Right! To be safe you should have a layer of spatchcocked (I love that word for dropping into conversations) Krispy Kremes! Cooking adds such a very colorful vocabulary, second only to the specialized plumbing vernacular! ouch

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/24/21 11:47 PM
Campbell's condensed Mushroom Soup makes a good gravy. Just reduce it down.

smile
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 10/25/21 12:56 AM
Steaks on the charbecue (fighting climate change one meal at a time) and a load of veggies from the biochar enhanced garden.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/25/21 04:02 PM
I am unfamiliar with the term Charbecue, and googling didnt help. Is this just a pun on barbecue or is the cooking fuel biochar or liquid or vapor from dry distillation of woody materials? Much of the distillate would be methanol which is generally highly toxic, but frequently used in warming platters in Sterno. Hard-up drunks have found that the toxic effects can be removed by straining Sterno through a gym sock, though it is rarely specified if a clean or dirty gym sock is better. I think it's subjective like mouth feel.

TAT
Safety note! This proposed detoxification is absolutely untrue! Fake news!
But drinking methanol does make it harder to find more methanol.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 10/25/21 11:20 PM
A charbecue is a magical device, invented by a swell bunch of Trolls, whereby an ordinary Muggle may cook food to perfection while making money and removing 15 pounds of CO2 from the atmosphere in the process.

It's very, very hard for me to believe that a person of your excellence and obvious connections has never heard of this sorcery?
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/25/21 11:44 PM
MO 10/25

Homestyle meatloaf, roasted carrots, and mashed pots.

smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/26/21 02:27 AM
Originally Posted by logtroll
A charbecue is a magical device, invented by a swell bunch of Trolls, whereby an ordinary Muggle may cook food to perfection while making money and removing 15 pounds of CO2 from the atmosphere in the process.

It's very, very hard for me to believe that a person of your excellence and obvious connections has never heard of this sorcery?

Muggie ,Muggy, or Muggle? both new words for me!
http://www.twainquotes.com/Ass.html - Pudd'nhead Wilson
Like the ass in Pudd'nhead Wilson's calendar Instead of feeling complimented when called a muggie/muggle, I am left in doubt.

TAT

Quote
Proper noun; a person who is bullshitting, but with great skill and humour and sounds like they might be telling the truth, but something indicates a lie based on the entire story in context.

However a perfectly valid story can earn the teller the appellation Muggy in order to dis them or cause general laughter in order to change to a lighter mood. Calling Muggy usually means the caller has to explain why or bullshit in return. Friendly arguing ensues with increasingly clever insults.
He said (with great earnestness) I sat there after the party and damned if I didn't look up just in time to see a strange object go across the sky. I'm not the only one who saw it, so and so were there too!
Muggy
Proper noun; a person who is bullshitting, but with great skill and humour and sounds like they might be telling the truth, but something indicates a lie based on the entire story in context.

However a perfectly valid story can earn the teller the appellation Muggy in order to dis them or cause general laughter in order to change to a lighter mood. Calling Muggy usually means the caller has to explain why or bullshit in return. Friendly arguing ensues with increasingly clever insults.
He said (with great earnestness) I sat there after the party and damned if I didn't look up just in time to see a strange object go across the sky. I'm not the only one who saw it, so and so were there too!
Muggy
Proper noun; a person who is bullshitting, but with great skill and humour and sounds like they might be telling the truth, but something indicates a lie based on the entire story in context.

However a perfectly valid story can earn the teller the appellation Muggy in order to dis them or cause general laughter in order to change to a lighter mood. Calling Muggy usually means the caller has to explain why or bullshit in return. Friendly arguing ensues with increasingly clever insults.
He said (with great earnestness) I sat there after the party and damned if I didn't look up just in time to see a strange object go across the sky. I'm not the only one who saw it, so and so were there too!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/26/21 04:21 AM
Originally Posted by Ken Condon
I make my own tahini which is essentially just ground up sesame seeds with olive oil. But I toast them first in a Dutch oven by spreading them in a thin layer and keep shaking them as they toast over medium high heat. Careful not to burn them though as burnt sesame seeds taste horrible. But toasted ones taste awesome in the hummus! Then mix them with the garbanzos and a whole roasted garlic bulb. Throw in some lemon juice little salt some more oil as needed and there you go for a great hummus.

I have immolated many sesame seeds! They need too much attention, but I do just fine with pumpkin seeds, which will soon be plentiful!
I love the roasted sesame seed taste, and I have found a convenient work-around. Most Chinese food stores carry roasted/toasted sesame oils that can be added to hummus to provide that delicious taste without tediously watching the tiny tick shaped seeds burn. The seeds can be purchased with or without the hulls, but for economical reasons I buy them WITH the hulls, and then just peel some when I need some unhulled! grin

Its also great for a quick sesame addition to noodle dishes, or most anything you want to sesamize.

TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 10/26/21 01:09 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Originally Posted by logtroll
A charbecue is a magical device, invented by a swell bunch of Trolls, whereby an ordinary Muggle may cook food to perfection while making money and removing 15 pounds of CO2 from the atmosphere in the process.

It's very, very hard for me to believe that a person of your excellence and obvious connections has never heard of this sorcery?


Like the ass in Pudd'nhead Wilson's calendar Instead of feeling complimented when called a muggie/muggle, I am left in doubt.
Oh, dear me, no! My only intent in the Muggle reference was that one doesn't have to know magic to experience the magic of a Charbecue.
Quote
"Non-magic people (more commonly known as Muggles) were particularly afraid of magic in medieval times, but not very good at recognising it."— A History of Magic by Bathilda Bagshot
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/26/21 05:06 PM
charbeque disambiguation

OK, I will recover! It was a fogón conclusion that I was looking for Charbeque in all the wrong places, and readily found information with the proper search strategery, cooking and biochar.
They appear to burn lots of various manures in those third world countries, so I'm wondering that with chicken, dogs, cats, and human "materials", which do you like best in your non-smoker? Curious about the model you use, though I figure you have already modified and improved anything on the market. I tested my propane BBQ and it generated absolutely no, nada, zilch biochar. I may have to add some mulch/compost.
TAT
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/26/21 05:36 PM
What’s curious TAT is that your suggestions for hummus seem so obvious in retrospect even though I never thought of trying them before. But I don’t have a problem toasting the sesame seeds as it takes about five minutes and I don’t mind continuously shaking the pan. But I do want to try it with roasted pumpkin seeds instead of sesame. I’ve been a fan of eating roasted pumpkin seeds since I was a kid.

I think that pumpkin seed hummus would taste awesome.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/28/21 03:22 PM
As long as we are already tastefully discussing[Linked Image from images.firstwefeast.com] Ken!
Here is a opportunity to discuss the fifth taste/flavor savory
[Linked Image from images.firstwefeast.com], not like there is anything wrong with that rolleyes

Fermented soy, schrooms, yeast extracts, meat, aged cheeses, tomatos. and breast milk. It signals protein to the brain and stomach as thus has survival value in food recognition. It's components may include glutamate the salt of the amino acid glutamic acid from protein breakdown, and nucleotides inosinate and guanylate from breakdown of nucleic acids. s*** ake mushrooms umami has mainly guanylate. Mostly they are naturally sodium salts.
Mono-sodium-glutamate, MSG, got a bad, and unjustified terrible PR treatment, and the sad result of the MSG wars resulted in loss of taste in takeout Chinese food and many others as removal was seen as a positive marketing ploy.

I buy MSG, Accent, literally by the pound,
MOAR Umami
and add it liberally to most savories, and I remain completely norbal! crazy
Along with citric acid I also add it to hummus, soups, stews, sauces, etc.
Its certainly more cost effective than any of the natural sources. I cant eat most Chinese takeout without it!
I tested pure MSG for side effects, as so many dietary snowflakes blamed almost all of their psychosomatic effects on MSG. I did not notice anything with 5 grams of MSG on an empty stomach. I enjoy debunking other pseudo-scientific dietary myths, like it's tryptophan in turkey that is responsible for the soporific effects of a Thanksgiving gorging that also usually has alcohol. While doing an experiment using tryptophan I decided to test it on an empty stomach. Ten grams did nothing and I continued by lab work.

Umami also enhances other flavors too, which reminds me to test it on a sweet and sour dish to see who wins by umamiing. No problems have been noticed with hot and sour dishes.

If I'm really Jonesing for [Linked Image from images.firstwefeast.com] Ken,
I make up a batch of my very special s*** ake Stilton fondue with Gruyere base, and serve it with various toasted breads and pickled mixed veggies, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots etc. My wife turned up her nose as I described the ingredients, but she ended up fighting me to scrape the last dregs from the bowl.

Say MOAR to [Linked Image from images.firstwefeast.com]!

TAT
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/28/21 08:08 PM
MSG was popular in Hawaii when I was a kid for obvious reasons. Lots of Asians there. The brand we used was Ajinomoto. I still use it today as I have never had a problem with MSG (The whole Chinese food syndrome thing was a bunch of BS) and I agree it adds a wonderful umami flavor to foods.

It also brings to mind the following stupid little joke we learned as kids growing up there:

Q: What did the Japanese farmer say after he dropped the ax on his foot?

A: A gee!… No mo toe…
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 10/28/21 10:57 PM
Quote
I buy MSG, Accent, literally by the pound

Why would you buy so much? A little goes a long way. Do you have some sort of food processing business going on?
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 12:11 AM
Is it true that umami wears ahmi boots?
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 12:27 AM
Umami wears comboot bats!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 02:01 AM
Originally Posted by Ken Condon
Quote
I buy MSG, Accent, literally by the pound

Why would you buy so much? A little goes a long way. Do you have some sort of food processing business going on?

By the 0.98 Kilos, actually! I was just getting ready to reorder Accent. I fill a small Accent shaker from the 0.98K container, that I bought 613 days ago according to Amazon. That works out to 1.63g/day. 1 tsp of MSG weighs 7.98g, call it 8. That sounds about right, 0.2 tsp/day. I also find that food needs less salt when using MSG, though it obviously has sodium, but much less than table salt.

The suggested dose is 4g/pound of meat (sorry for mixing metric with imperial units) or 4-6 servings of veggies. Rarely does a day go by without at least one meal with MSG, soup, chili, lentil stew, collards with hot sausage, and almost every takeout including savory salads!
Sounds like I might have a little Umami Oedipal problem, so I'm looking into Accent Anonymous!
TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 02:27 AM
Originally Posted by logtroll
Is it true that umami wears ahmi boots?

Actually yes! grin
Both parents were in WWII. Mother was head Nurse in a program training nurses to go overseas, and a hospital ward. Big Nurse comes to mind. Father was Doc working on chemical warfare. Both were Captains, but my father outranked her by a month, except that when he met her, he was a patient with a kidney stone in HER ward! She told him to lie down and he objected as he knew it hurt worse to lie down. He tried to pull rank as a Doctor, but she overruled him as rank doesn't count when a patient. It was love at first conflict, and she allowed him to retain the illusion of control, after a power sharing agreement was hammered out grin

TAT
Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 07:16 PM
So okay, TAT is the resident MSG expert and I'm the guy with the kid who is restricted by his cardiologist to very low salt intake.
Does MSG count as salt intake? Does it work like salt to make the body retain water, which is Daryl's Enemy Numero Uno?
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 08:23 PM
Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
Does MSG count as salt intake?
Yes. Sodium is Mono Glutamate's middle name. laugh
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/29/21 11:34 PM
Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
So okay, TAT is the resident MSG expert and I'm the guy with the kid who is restricted by his cardiologist to very low salt intake.
Does MSG count as salt intake? Does it work like salt to make the body retain water, which is Daryl's Enemy Numero Uno?

First Jeff, I so sorry to read about Daryl's struggles with heart failure and edema. See below to find much more than most want to know about MSG as a salt reduction strategy. But, bottom line MSG does contain Sodium, but much less than the amounts of NaCl needed for palatability. The amounts and conversions are detailed below. Further reduction in sodium can be achieved using other Cations (my favorite ions) grin like potassium, calcium, and ammonium NH4+, but in Daryl's case they can cause other problems and would have to be approved by his treating physicians.
It's actually much more complicated when we start discussing Sodium and Chloride in the context of fluid retention in heart failure and diuretic use. There is now considerable data that Chloride may be the bad actor rather than Sodium, but as they are usually consumed together as NaCl it has been hard to define their indivdual roles in volume regulation in general and specifically in diuretic resistant heart failure. For example Na Bicarbonate, baking soda, does not have the same fluid retention stimulation as NaCl. The body disposes of excess Bicarbonate by blowing off CO2 from the lungs, but cant dispose of Chloride which has to be done through the kidney. Which brings up pretty much all of Kidney physiology to help understand fluid and blood pressure regulation by the renin-angiotensin system.
I will post some references that may help, but it is an extremely complicated and confusing system, even to those of us who have been dealing with this for 40-50 years! And, Medical Students really hate it because they have to know it!
Much MOAR later!
TAT

Monosodium glutamate as a tool to reduce sodium in foodstuffs: Technological and safety aspects

In comparison to NaCl, glutamate salts such as MSG or monoammonium L‐glutamate and disodium inosinate and guanylate, have low or no sodium content (Figure 1). There is an appropriate amount of MSG for NaCl replacement with maintaining acceptance of the food. This is because an excess of MSG does not promote the umami taste and, on the contrary, could lead to an undesirable sensation (Jinap & Hajeb, 2010). The recommendation for MSG use as food additive is 0.1%–0.8% of weight, which corresponds to the amount of free L‐glutamate present naturally in tomato or parmesan cheese (Beyreuther et al., 2007). For MSG, the amount of sodium is 12.28 g/100 g, and this is 1/3 of the sodium when compared to NaCl (39.34 g/100 g). To use MSG in a homemade recipe, such as 500 g of foodstuff (rice, minced meat, etc.), a simple replacement of 1/2 teaspoon of NaCl (2.5 g) by 1/2 teaspoon of MSG (2.0 g) reduces sodium content in about 37% (Maluly, Pagani, & Capparelo, 2013).
An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc. Object name is FSN3-5-1039-g001.jpg
Figure 1

Structures and sodium content of monosodium glutamate monohydrate, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate

The following sections present potential applications of MSG to reduce sodium content in specific foods.
3.1. Soups

Yamaguchi and Takahashi (1984) were some of the first researchers who tested different concentrations of NaCl and MSG in soups with reduced sodium content. The authors evaluated sensory panels via the consumption of sumashi‐jiru, a popular soup in Japan, made with dried bonito fish. The scales used by the sensory panels varied in a range of seven points that considered the amount of NaCl and palatability: from “extremely strong or palatable” (+3) to “extremely weak or unpalatable” (−3). Each panelist evaluated nine samples randomly and considered the concentration of 0.81 g/100 g of NaCl and 0.38 g/100 g of MSG as an ideal formulation. The authors verified that the reduction in the NaCl amount did not affect the palatability of the salty taste. With these concentrations, it was possible to reduce sodium content and maintain acceptability. This research suggested that to increase the palatability of reduced sodium products, MSG content should be tested at fixed concentrations while varying the levels of NaCl until finding the most appropriate combination. This is the best strategy to reduce the total sodium content in soups without influencing their palatability.

A recent study conducted by Jinap et al. (2016) investigated the acceptance of a sodium reduction in spicy soups (curry chicken and chili chicken) by Malaysian panelists, replacing NaCl with MSG. The authors verified that MSG could maintain the acceptability of the soups. The high score of acceptability was given for the soups with 0.8 g/100 g and 0.7 g/100 g of NaCl and MSG, respectively. These amounts corroborate a previous study published by Yamaguchi and Takahashi (1984), who noted that MSG could reduce the sodium content by 32.5%.
3.2. Stocks and seasonings

Stocks and seasonings containing NaCl are generally the main vehicles to elevate sodium consumption, according to the POFs (2002–2003 and 2008–2009) (Sarno et al., 2009, 2013).


5. FINAL COMMENTS

Considering the available data in the scientific literature, in addition to the information provided by the flavor enhancer industry, we could verify the use of umami substances as a strategy to reduce sodium in different foodstuffs (processed and homemade foods) without affecting the perception of saltiness and, therefore, contributing to the wellness and safety of the population. Many applications evaluated showed promising results, especially in those products with elevated sodium contents such as processed meat.

Despite concerns about the toxicity potential of MSG raised by some studies, regulatory agencies have demonstrated the safety of use of this food additive through toxicity assessments and randomized double blind, placebo‐controlled studies. An ADI “not specified” or GRAS status has been allocated to glutamate and its salts, meaning that it can be used as a food additive in the necessary amount to achieve the desired technological effect. Nonetheless, in the European Union, a use limit of 10 g glutamate/kg of food has been established.

Other strategies, such as the use of nucleotides (IMP and GMP) and NFEs, could also be useful for enhancing products with reduced sodium content. The combination of different substances in a formulation could generate a larger impact in flavor continuity due to their synergistic effect when added at recommended concentrations to maintain the desirable flavor without exceeding the sensorial and technological limits.

Sensorial and physicochemical tests are always recommended to obtain higher quality products while respecting the preferences of the consumers and the lifestyles of the modern life.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 10/31/21 11:28 PM
Air Fried Green Tomatoes for dinner side dish, signifying the absolute end of the home tomato season. Breaded with seasoned panko, sprayed with olive oil, and air fried for 15 minutes, turning half way through. Tart but crispy with interesting contrast of textures.
However, I think with Fried Green Tomatoes, like the BBQ,
the secret's in the sauce eek2

Tat
Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 11/01/21 01:57 AM
Originally Posted by Greger
I cooked black rice for the first time last night. Black rice contains high levels of seven different antho­cyanin polyphenols...antioxidents.

I made a mushroom and shallot risotto seasoned with hyssop and sumac(za'atar).

served that with homemade hummus and Lay's Ruffles potato chips.

Hyssop??
I thought hyssop was supposed to be a very unpleasant and bitter substance, which was why the Roman soldiers
handed a cup of the stuff to thirsty Jesus. They wanted to mock his suffering, so the Bible says and when he begged
for water, they gave him a cup of hyssop, which he spat out.

Don't ask me why I remember this, I haven't been a Catholic since right after Confirmation but
my mind is filled with useless info like this.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/01/21 01:58 AM
  • Grilled sirloin steak
  • Sauteed onions and mushrooms for the steak topping
  • Yukon golds sliced 1/4" thick oven roasted
  • Green beans tossed in olive oil, oven roasted


smile
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/01/21 02:02 AM
Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
...so the Bible says....

:doh:

The Bible also has a recipe for an abortion tea, Christians pretend never to have seen Numbers 5:11-31. coffee
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/01/21 06:11 PM
Originally Posted by Greger
I keep the hummus basic but usually squirt a dollop of Sriracha on top before I dig in.

and I don't peel the garbanzos.

I also draw a line at peeling garbonzos, but there are now methods, heating with bicarb, to remove the skins. Might try it to see what whacko garbonzos are talking about, re smoothness. If you doubt that there are garbonzos, my name for chickpea fanatics, you should follow the Vega frenzy over AquaFaba, the juice from canned GBs, after someone notice that it could be used a eggwhite substitute, particularly in mixed drinks needing egg foam.They even had their own website for it aquafaba.com where you could donate to aquafaba research!

Aquafaba Homepage
Peeling garbonzo beans seems counterproductive anyway, as why would you want to remove an excellent source of fiber? (nature's little brooms)
Maybe its a foodie snowflake thing, like the princess and the chick pea.

So the major question is: Should you drain off the highly precious Aquafaba and sell it to Vegans, or use it to thin the hummus if needed? The vegans had a huge glut of the beans because they only wanted the aquafaba!crazy

Should we drink the aquafaba? Straight up or mixed? grin
TAT
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 11/02/21 12:11 AM
Hey TAT and/or PIA for that matter…an authentic highfalutin Loco Moco recipe from the grocery store chain we used to shop at when I was a kid. Foodland! has some great local Hawaii style recipes if anyone out there might be interested in such things.

The Portuguese Bean Soup and Oxtail Soup recipes are also good and huge Hawaii favorites. Then again perhaps too much meat for today’s sensibilities but they taste good and one could always make hummus with veggie sticks if one prefers that sort of thing. :applaud: It’s funny, when I do voice to text Google will translate Hawaii into something not at all like Hawaii. PIA knows what I am talking about. “Over there” we pronounce it “huh whuh ee”, not Ha-wai.

PIA knows, or least his wife does. But I digress. TAT I present you with a real chit-kicking chest clutching Loco Moco “healthy heart” recipe:

Da Kine Loco Moco recipe
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 07:28 AM
SO EASY to make at home! I used to cook up a dozen hamburger patties, and keep them in the freezer. I make brown gravy using Beef Base in a jar, butter, rice flour, and water. Takes about three minutes. (I use rice flour because my wife is wheat-intolerant.) We usually have cooked rice in the fridge. So pop the rice and hamburger patty in the microwave, while you whip up the gravy and fry the egg.

Voila: Loco Moco in less than five minutes! 'Ono you know!

My wife is on a no-ground-beef kick right now. That's the problem with being married to a Veterinary Pathologist! But she does say I can buy chuck roasts and grind them my self.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 03:58 PM
Ground meat of any sort is dangerous as far as food safety laws are concerned and must be cooked beyond what is usually palatable to make it safe.

Usually, only the outside of a piece of meat can get contaminated, the inside is pretty much sterile until it begins to autolyze and toxins begin to form.
The problem with ground meat is that the outside becomes the inside and there is no way to wash away fecal contamination.

Everybody that's anybody grinds their own meat.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 04:14 PM
Quote
The Bible also has a recipe for an abortion tea, Christians pretend never to have seen Numbers 5:11-31.

What kinda curse do they put on men when they are unfaithful to their wives or their wives have feelings of jealousy?
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 04:23 PM
Quote
Should we drink the aquafaba? Straight up or mixed?

F*ck the aquafaba, I thin the beans with bean juice, olive oil, or lemon juice, or even tahini. depending on how it tastes. I've got no use for vegans and their nonsense. The one stipulation I had about my roommate was that he could NOT be vegan.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 05:33 PM
Originally Posted by Greger
Quote
Should we drink the aquafaba? Straight up or mixed?

F*ck the aquafaba, I thin the beans with bean juice, olive oil, or lemon juice, or even tahini. depending on how it tastes. I've got no use for vegans and their nonsense. The one stipulation I had about my roommate was that he could NOT be vegan.
ROTFMOL
I am naturally in complete agreement with Greger's Faqufaba damnation and analysis of the Vegan fanatical extremism, or I would never have lobbed such a softball across the dinner plate of another cocurmudgeon, particularly from his lawn! grin

TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 06:04 PM
Originally Posted by Greger
Ground meat of any sort is dangerous as far as food safety laws are concerned and must be cooked beyond what is usually palatable to make it safe.

Usually, only the outside of a piece of meat can get contaminated, the inside is pretty much sterile until it begins to autolyze and toxins begin to form.
The problem with ground meat is that the outside becomes the inside and there is no way to wash away fecal contamination.

Everybody that's anybody grinds their own meat.

"Tenderizing" means inserting contamination into steak!
We all agree on this autogrinding, but steaks used to be relatively safe as any surface contamination would likely be sterilized in the searing process. Not so when the processors tenderizers poke lots of little needles or blades into the meat injecting any surface contamination deep into the meat that will likely stay viable if only cooked to rare by conventional grilling. Those bugs will also happily proliferate inside the meat, waiting for their chance at you. You may not be able to tell if meat has been tenderized, if not labeled as such.
I would not buy tenderized meat, but if I accidentally did or someone asked me for advice, I would tell them that I universally use Sous Vide technology on all steaks and most chicken, as it is the safest way to ensure meat sterilization without totally immolating meat to well done terminal status, an insult to the meat! Its also the best way to cook them for taste and consistency!


TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/04/21 11:34 PM
I'm munching on a leftover lamb chop, cooked sous vide, seared in Tunisian olive oil, reheated in the air fryer. Yes, I got one and I love it!

My ex picked the chops up at Aldi, I don't know if they needle their meat but they were damned good little chops.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/05/21 03:31 PM
Air Fryers are very versatile, and you will find many uses for that tool. Its similar to weed eaters and power washers in the respect that once you have one it seems like most things need some weed-eating or power-washing. It takes the fleas right off of the animals, but the animal get a little distant.
It is, as you have found, a convenient complementary technique to Sous Vide, that doesn't sear, brown, or crisp for SH!T!
Several failures have been discovered. You can't brown or crisp a tortilla without pinning it down as the air flow tosses them around otherwise. It is however excellent for melting cheese on top of a tostada, just make sure the cheese is in an enough of a slab to not get airborne, not shredded, trust me grin or try it yourself. 30 seconds is usually enough if fryer is preheated.

Collard chips were not a big hit unless you really like collards. sick Puffball mushroom slabs were too light and got pulverized by air flow, though machine does have a dehydrator mode, I was interested in browning them, and already have a bigger dehydrator.

Experiment and enjoy!
TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/05/21 06:48 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Air Fryers are very versatile...
Experiment and enjoy!
TAT
Broiled air is damn tasty if you add some mushroom powder!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/05/21 08:02 PM
What I recommend for dried mushroom powder, as I have had lots of experience with the light and very airy puffball powder, is to put an even 4mm layer on the grill of the air fryer with it off. Then start it and quickly, with close visual observation, open it, without using the blower pause button, and experience a total immersion umami experience! It takes the edge off of PTGD, Post Traumatic GRANT Disorder, but alcohol is still the umaminous best practice treatment!

Enjoy Umami
TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/06/21 03:39 AM
Got me some Ben&Jerry's Salt and Caramel Core ice cream...
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 11/07/21 03:55 PM
That makes for a great dinner.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/07/21 05:19 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
...best practice...

He, he...management at work uses that term all-of-the-time. crazy
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/07/21 06:57 PM
I qualified that "best practice" with the prefix umaminous, rendering the umaminous best practice into adminitraitor lingo while remaining in compliance! grin she she
I figured after being immersed in grant writing jargon that Loggie might not understand it unless I threw in some management boilerplate in a timely fashion. grin Can you tell I used to play a manager at work?

TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 01:26 AM
I have been pondering on one of the news stories about Big Bird catching BurdFlew or some such Burdypox, with variable medical outcomes, depending on Party association. Dems die, Repubs Live and Free, Indecisives purrsistant vegetative state... crazy

Which is a long way of getting around how Big Bird at 8"2 show be cooked if he took a bad turn. I was thinking of a large hot tub and a waterbed bladder for the MOAR SOUS VIDE MAGNUM. During the years Big Bird's weight has been creeping up, as a few of us, from 160 pounds to approaching 300! I dont think a hours/pound formula would work out. I figure 145 F for 24 hrs, with probably some adjustments. Greger will suggest 2-3 days.

So how many people should this serve?
I very briefly considered a whole animal deep fat fry but I think there is an exclusion for that activity in my fire insurance!

TAT
Reheated Thai, by the way!
Posted By: Mellowicious Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 01:33 AM
Make sure you have enough for the hundreds of enough therapists who will be needed to console the bereaved, nay, broken-hearted children.

You’ll have to guess how many of those therapists will be vegetarian if not vegan.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 01:59 AM
Originally Posted by Mellowicious
Make sure you have enough for the hundreds of enough therapists who will be needed to console the bereaved, nay, broken-hearted children.

You’ll have to guess how many of those therapists will be vegetarian if not vegan.
HelloMello,
NO NOT THAT!
Maybe they could help the children cope by getting them involved with the process of dealing with loss.
Big Bird won't pull himself grin

On a related point: Is it ethical to eat a Vegan? Hmm sick
What about a free range Vegetarian? ThumbsUp

TAT
Posted By: Mellowicious Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 02:10 AM
You can eat a vegan, yes, but you need some damn good salad dressing.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 02:34 AM
Rick's version of Linguini carbonera. (Rick needs to work on his recipe laugh )
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 02:48 AM
Originally Posted by Mellowicious
You can eat a vegan, yes, but you need some damn good salad dressing.

I'm thinking something heavy on the Blue Cheese side of dressings would be appropriate, but the problem is that their are only two wings! When in doubt, I go with my favorite, Blue
Stilton, but it should be up to the task. Any British cheese that leaves the French feeling blue has something special going for it.

TAT

Stilton

Stilton description

Quote
We're currently the only Stilton maker to produce an organic Stilton, and this cheese is certified by the Soil Association – a guarantee that it meets their exacting organic standards. Our Organic Stilton has a delicious mellow flavour, which contrasts with the tanginess of its delicate blue veins.
grin

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 03:03 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Reheated Thai, by the way!
I'm sure the Thai restaurants in upstate NY are very authentic. coffee
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 03:04 AM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Reheated Thai, by the way!
I'm sure the Thai restaurants in upstate NY are very authentic. coffee

Let's just say the "Mexican food" in Seattle is not like the authentic "Mexican food" in El Lay. smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 03:35 AM
Our most authentic Thai restaurant sadly closed. I think it was just a bad location, right next to the veterinary hospital! The restaurant did have all natural meats, that all died natural deaths, tumor, infection, and diabetes, but the best were the de jour specials, were recent traumas.
Recipes on request! grin

TAT

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/362047257519178188/
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/1548181143899836/

My surprise favorite is :Guess the mess, if you can identify it, you eat for free!
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 04:01 PM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
Rick's version of Linguini carbonara. (Rick needs to work on his recipe laugh )

I'd use olive oil instead of bacon grease. And probably pre-cooked bacon. And some mushroom powder.

I haven't tried mushroom powder yet but I'm a big fan of 'shrooms in general so it's just a matter of time. My current umami go-to is nutritional yeast which isn't terribly different from mushrooms. It's cheesy and lends depth and richness to recipes and can even be used as a thickener if your sauce is a little too runny.

I was a wok jockey at a Thai place for a while.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 07:21 PM
Ah, another nutritional yeastophile! We go through lots of it as it is very habit forming. It's a perfect garnish for peanut butter or avocado toast that librules, like wife, enjoy. We started using it in North Carolina during the dreadful flea season, before modern day flea larva pesticides were available. It was supposed to repel fleas from cats and humans because of the taste, but it was not effective as I suspect fleas have umami sensors.
The cats, however loved it and quickly became addicted to it and would beg for it. They still do as a morning ritual that cannot be forgotten as they assertively remind me while I'm trying to eat.

It goes great with most soups, stews, left-overs, Chinese, and of course Thai, just like MSG.
Re:
Quote
I was a wok jockey at a Thai place for a while.
Got any tips for wokking a cat? nono

TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 07:34 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Got any tips for wokking a cat? nonoTAT
One reminder - if you plan to wok them to death at slave labor, don't forget they have nine lives!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/10/21 07:42 PM
Originally Posted by logtroll
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Got any tips for wokking a cat? nonoTAT
One reminder - if you plan to wok them to death at slave labor, don't forget they have nine lives!

NO NOT THAT!! nono
Zombie feline stir fry! sick

Leftover, leftover, leftover Leftover, leftover, leftover, Leftover, leftover, leftover... tonbricks

TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 01:32 AM
I'm bach-ing for a couple of weeks, the better half is galavanting all over the country from SW Washington State to Houston. So I made some turbo-charged ramen tonight - diced green onions from the garden, two fresh eggs stolen right out from under Henny Penny, three chopped up shrimp, some small cubed up organic pork fat carved off of some chops from a couple of weeks ago, a dash of Vietnamese mushroom umami, and of course a packet of cheap-ass ramen noodles.

Purty tasty!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:02 AM


Quote
Chicken and Confit Yuzu Parmentier with Sakura Cherry Blossom
A fusion food delight, for those who love to discover exotic flavors. Floral and umami, this dish is a flavorful surprise!

Ingredients for 2 persons:
1 large sweet potato, 2 chicken fillets, 8 sakura tree leafs, 8 sakura cherry blossoms, 1 large tbsp miso paste, 2 tbsp confit yuzu peel, 1 tbsp black sesame seeds, 5 grains of selim, 10 cinnamon berries, 40gr butter, Mirin cooking wine, olive oil, a pinch of salt.

You can add more grains of selim and cinnamon berries if you want a more intense flavor.

Yeah Right! I had a good start, but found I was out of Sakura cherry blossoms and confit yuzu peel grin

Plan C: Triple reheated fit to be Thiaed sick
Also batching it for some unknown reason!

By the way, You cant spell ramen without umami
TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:49 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Our most authentic Thai restaurant sadly closed. I think it was just a bad location, right next to the veterinary hospital!...!
I...will...not...make...dead...dog...jokes...in...the...presence...of...Thai...food.


coffee
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 04:04 AM
Well, that leaves the field open for the rest of us! grin
Do you think Roscoe is worried about all that wokking with a wok jocky?

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 04:07 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Well, that leaves the field open for the rest of us! grin
Do you think Roscoe is worried about all that wokking with a wok jocky?
If Roscoe reads RR while Greger is asleep, he should be worried. smile
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 12:11 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Plan C: Triple reheated fit to be Thiaed TAT

You misspelled “Thaied”… (your friend, the made up word spelling Nazi)


I believe "Thai'd" would be acceptable, too - and more artistic.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 02:23 PM
As I mentioned, being on my own for a few weeks has me rustling up all the grub around the joint. Having paid a limited amount of attention as my excellent cook partner did most of the rustling in days past, and had left me with a considerable amount of boiled potatoes to keep me alive until her return (I reckon that's proof that I have some redeeming value here). The last six taters were showing signs of changing their corporeal state from starch-in-a-ugly-skin to rough hewn vodka (I do have some facility in sheff-speak). So I thought it best to rescue them through a process of washing, followed by near severe nuking, and closing with mashing (with butter and 1/2&1/2). A neat trick I had observed is that you can use a 'ricer' as the initial step in mashing.

My question is: I thought ricin' was dangerous - am I going to die a horrible death?
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 02:57 PM
Probably, but it won't be your mode of pureeing potatoes that does it.

It might, however, involve toxins in aging leftover potatoes.

Old boiled potatoes aren't safe to eat. Reheating them makes them more dangerous.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:15 PM
Ruh-roh...

But I'm from Idaho, wouldn't I have spud immunity?
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:20 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Do you think Roscoe is worried about all that wokking with a wok jocky?
TAT
Well, I must say that one is both clever and funny, not to mention alliterate. I'd give it an award, if I had one - but all I have is a word - excellent!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:28 PM
deadly green potatos

Horrific Tales of Potatoes That Caused Mass Sickness and Even Death

A greened potato indicates the presence of a toxin that can cause gastrointestinal distress, induce coma or even death within 24 hours of consumption

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If you eat enough of the green stuff, it can cause vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, paralysis of the central nervous system (as evidenced by the incident above) but in some rare cases the poisoning can cause coma—even death. Studies have recorded illnesses caused by a range of 30 to 50 mg of solanine per 100 grams of potato, but symptoms vary depending on the ratio of body weight of the toxin and the individual’s tolerance of the alkaloid. The following cases recorded in various medical journals include examples of some of the most severe cases of solanine poisoning (many of which resulted in death):
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:33 PM
Not to worry though, fatal cases of solanine poisoning are very rare these days. Most commercial varieties of potatoes are screened for solanine, but any potato will build up the toxin to dangerous levels if exposed to light or stored improperly. Often, the highest concentrations of solanine are in the peel, just below the surface and in the sprouted “eyes”—things that are typically removed in cooking preparation—though Warren would argue even boiling water in potato prep dissolves only a little of the alkaloid. Emsley and Fell continue:

Most people can easily cope with the solanine in the average portion of potato and show no symptoms of poisoning because the body can break it down and rapidly and excrete the products in the urine. But if the level of solanine is as high as 40 mg per 100 g of potato, symptoms include diarrhea…even coma.

The best way to prevent solanine poisoning is to store tubers in a cool, dark place and remove the skin before consumption. A general rule for avoiding illnesses like the ones described above? Green and sprouted? Throw it out.

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 03:52 PM
Botulism was actually the preferred toxin in leftover potatoes, spuds, as it turns out are a perfect growing medium for various toxic foodborne bacterium. They're cheap, plentiful and easy to safely cook from raw. Using old(cooked) potatoes just isn't worth the risk.

Microwaves are notoriously poor at heating foods evenly and will seldom achieve a killing temp of 165F for most toxins, but botulism requires 185F for five minutes to render the toxins somewhat safer to consume. If you don't make potato pancakes the morning after you enjoy your mash then toss them.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 04:22 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Not to worry though, fatal cases of solanine poisoning are very rare these days...
Same with trichonosis. But you be you and cook your pork well done. smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 05:45 PM
Trichinosis has been virtually eliminated in the pork processing industry. Unlike a barnyard pig or a wild boar. The more "natural" the pork, the greater the danger. Not just from trichinosis but from all the other various sources of contamination.

I just got an 8lb pork butt for .99 a pound. Quartered it and cooked sous vide at 145F for 18 hours as per J Kenzi Alt-Lopez. Finished in the air fryer on roast at 300F for 25 minutes.

When I carved it there was STILL the slightest shade of pink to it. Generally speaking, the pink myoglobin in meat will turn brown at 140 degrees.

Less fatty cuts of pork like loin and tenderloin are better done in the 135 IT range.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 08:16 PM
Say no to Cougar jerky!

Frankly they got what they deserved for eating a CAT, let alone a raw one! mad
Recommendation for wild cats or any wild critters are for 170F. Freezing used to be preventative for Trixie but this isolate was freeze resistant. Cant make Cougar Tartar without long low temp sous vide. sick

TAT

[quote]
Outbreak of Trichinellosis Associated with Eating Cougar Jerky -- Idaho, 1995

During the second week of January, the index patient shot and killed a cougar (Felis concolor) near Elk City, Idaho. During January 15-18, he prepared jerky from the cougar meat by first soaking the meat in a brine solution made from table salt, then smoking the meat; however, he later reported the smoker never became more than warm. During the next 4 weeks, he distributed the meat to 14 other persons, all of whom ate the meat within days to 1 month after receipt.

On January 26, the man had onset of illness characterized by fever, myalgia, arthralgia, facial swelling, and fatigue. On examination by his physician, his total white blood cell count was 8500/mm3 (normal: 5000-10,000/mm3) with 48% eosinophils, 32% segmented neutrophils, 17% lymphocytes, and 3% monocytes. Based on these findings, trichinellosis was suspected, and he was referred to an infectious disease consultant.

During March 3-April 10, NCDHD interviewed the 14 persons who had received jerky. Seven of these persons were men; case-patients ranged in age from 25 to 52 years.

Trichinella species are found in virtually all warm-blooded animals. As domestic swine-associated cases have decreased, the proportion of cases associated with eating wild game has increased, and cases have resulted from consumption of bear, wild boar, and walrus (3-5). This report is the first to document cougar as the source of trichinellosis in the United States. In this investigation, viable larvae were recovered from meat that had been frozen. Although most species of Trichinella are killed by freezing, results of the genomic DNA amplification performed at USDA suggest that the cougar isolate was either T. nativa or Trichinella T6, both freeze-resistant strains that have not been previously reported in Idaho.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/11/21 11:18 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
During the second week of January, the index patient shot and killed a cougar (Felis concolor) near Elk City, Idaho.

On January 26, the man had onset of illness characterized by fever, myalgia, arthralgia, facial swelling, and fatigue.
Well, sir, I used to live in Elk City, Idaho. I had a job with the Forest Service for two summers leading the trail maintenance crew.

I can tell you that this disease would be hard to diagnose among the locals there, as the symptoms were considered the normal state of affairs pursuant to multiple generations of inbreeding (or 'staying pure' as they called it), alcoholism (or lunch and dinner as it was also known, and oftentimes breakfast), and a cultural bent towards moronism (not to be confused with Mormonism).

I'm glad have been able to clarify matters somewhat.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/12/21 03:50 AM
When I read that article, many years ago, about Trichinosis from cougar jerky, I figured that there was an interesting banjo backstory to it. Your description sounds about right, but so wrong. What kind of expert hunter doesnt know about cooking temperatures and dangers? The jerker even had the confidence to share the jerked contagion with his previous friends, that sound like about 10% of the town, and likely very related! More than one way to cook a cougar There is even a cooking video showing the steps to cook a present cougar, though it looks pretty tough when they slice it for serving. Looks like another application for sous vide to me.
There are even recipe pages that include instruction for two methods for skinning the cat!

MOAR than one way to toss a cat on the barbie
The videos are the best! grin

moar cougar recipes including cougar Rolled Schnitzel

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/12/21 04:09 AM
Welp, you can always "cook" raw proteins with an acid.

smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/12/21 03:08 PM
Ceviche classico with leche de TIGRE!

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There are two schools of thought on how long the fish or fluffy should be marinated in the lime juice. Traditionally, the fish was "cooked" in the acid for quite some time, but today it's pretty much eaten as it's made. Even a short marinating time means the proteins on the surface of the fish coagulate slightly and the fish appears to "cook", an effect caused by the difference in acidity between the lime and the fish flesh. It's important not to press the limes too hard when you're juicing them, because you don't want to release any bitterness from the pith.

Yeah, two schools, defined by their need of Ivermectin. Acid coagulated protein looks cooked but it is not sterilizing. I suggest you try it very fresh, with fresh water fish or wild game or roadkill! Plus, it's a terrible insult to large cats of all kinds impugning umami's milk!! mad mad

TAT

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In Lima, we include fresh boiled corn, coriander, fried dry corn, sweet potato and iceberg lettuce along with the seafood. In Peru, the fish most commonly used are lenguado (sole), corvina, pejerry (silverside) and bonito. We also use various types of rock fish, as well as sea urchin, octopus and black mud clams. At home and in Australia, I prefer to use firm-textured fish, but the most important thing is that it must be very fresh. (In Peru, back in the days before refrigeration, ceviche was eaten only for lunch, because the fish was fresh only in the morning, and in some places that belief is still held.)
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/13/21 12:11 AM
Just finished a bowl of chowdah! Shallot, scallion, and mushrooms sauteed in olive oil and butter. Spinach added and white wine until it wilted then a goodly dollop of cream, Lebanese Zaatar, salt pepper, nutritional yeast and a bit of parmesan cheese. then the fish cut in chunks, a few anchovy fillets, and the whole thing allowed to simmer for a spell.

Served it with hushpuppies,

One serving, about ten minutes plus a half hour to simmer. Fabulous!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/13/21 01:36 AM
I wish I could eat fish, but I have a terrible aversion to anything with fishy taste. I can eat scallops that are not fishy and dry smoked Albacore tuna or Sturgeon that are pretty much like smoked turkey. This aversion happened as a child in New Orleans,but nobody could remember a seafood related illness or adverse effect.

More than likely it was due to my Father's love of all aquatic creatures salt water or fresh that were obviously plentiful in the big queasy. Everything was dumped, alive, into the sink before trying to avoid boiling in a large aluminum pot. The list of boil-able victims included, but not limited to, shrimp, lobsters, crabs, and crawdads. All kinds of fish were cooked but not usually boiled.
Some of the most unfortunate victims were eaten RAW including clams (that curl up when lemon is squeezed on them), oysters, and the worst of all, sea urchins (erizos de mar in Chile) that are mostly purple gonads with a symbiotic crab that has to be alive to prove freshness. The crab is placed in the mouth first, and if it moves it's fresh, and then chewed to kill it. No movement, spit it out and reject the urchin. This may only be the way its done in Chile, and since I don't go to sushi places I'm not aware of the Japanese customs.
My aversion remains of unknown origin!

I feel deprived on scuba diving trips while everyone else gets fabulous sea food while I get free range chicken or stringy goat.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 07:03 PM
My chowdah was not fishy tasting!

Until you found an anchovy grin eek :doh:

I'm sorry you haven't been able to overcome that childhood trauma.

Fishy, beefy, porky, chickeny, cheesy, vegetably, I'm good with pretty much anything.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 08:01 PM
I considered hypnosis to overcome this fishophobia, but if successful I would eat fish and I hate them! grin

There was little my father wouldnt eat, at least try in the seafood category. When asked what he wouldnt eat again he admitted that whale blubber was on that list. sick It's not something usually classified as Sea Food.

When I accidentally ended up in a Prep high school (more like purp school) in NYC, for only a year before escaping to college, my senior class of 18 males had a drunken party on the town in Manhattan. Drinking age was 18 back then, and we mostly crashed at one of the apartments of a classmate whose parents were coincidentally out of town. grin Nobody really wanted to go home, severely drunk, to waiting parents. nono
For some/many of us it was our first encounter with a REAL hangover sick Nobody thought to bring a toothbrush so cigarette puke breath was dealt with by taking hits off of the tube of toothpaste. Some prankster, who already knew about hangovers, had refilled the toothpaste tube with anchovy paste! sick sick
It was clearly a premeditated act, and unfortunately I was not, that time, the purrpetrator! It was also a painful introduction to the dreaded dry-heaves.
It only reinforced my fish aversion, and I suffered more than most! sick sick sick failpail
TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 08:14 PM
MMmmmmm I love anchovy paste on toast! It's far superior to Vegemite.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 08:15 PM
I use anchovie paste to spruce up commercially bought Caesar salad dressing.

smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 08:50 PM

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 08:53 PM
It's perfect for that! I've been buying jars of fillets in oil and when the fish are used up I use the fishy salty oil in all sorts of things for an umami boost.

Last night I had a frozen "Mediterranean inspired" veggie pizza, I put an anchovy fillet in the middle of each slice!

For its small size anchovies pack a big nutritional punch and are popular in the Mediterranean diet.

Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 09:03 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
I wish I could eat fish, but I have a terrible aversion to anything with fishy taste.

If fish smells fishy, or tastes fishy - it's because it's old. Fresh fish does not smell or have an odor. smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 09:13 PM


NO MOAR ANCHOVIES

TAT
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 09:53 PM
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Fresh fish does not smell or have an odor.

Not necessarily so: I speared one perfectly alive fish, that totally grossed me out when I cleaned it. I think it had just swallowed a turd dumped from a boat. Also, cleaning some abalone I harvested at 85 feet depth off Bird Rock (La Jolla) just about made me unable to eat them. Their guts STINK to high heaven, even if they are still alive. This was within about an hour after prying them off the rocks. The pasta with abalone sauce I made from their feet was wonderful, but you really need a nose plug to clean them.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 10:26 PM
Shrimp Linguini

smile
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 10:52 PM
Corned beef on a sesame bun w/mustard, Swiss, and Grillo's pickles and a side of fries.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 10:59 PM
Taquitos with guacamole, cabbage sautéed in butter, corn on the cob
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 11:00 PM
I know that after cleaning fresh caught trout my hands smell fishy.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/14/21 11:42 PM
Blue Stilton on, you guessed it, on Stoned Wheat Thins with Shiraz.
Air Fried Hot Sausage with hot Brown Mustard on seeded Jewish Rye.
And a handful or two of Freshly air Roasted Pumpkin Seeds, harvested from UnCarved pumpkins pushed to the curbs! Waste not, Want not!

It has been a long-standing tradition to clean up the guts/innards of kids carved pumpkins, which was a tedious process of removing the slimy, but not fishy, fibrous material scooped out of decapitated jack-o-lanterns.
I was very labor intensive to extricate the seeds from the slimy, but not fishy, mess.
I was considering a much less laborious process this year. All you have to do is cut them in half with an axe along their equator. The seeds are exposed in radial symmetry along the walls, held only by a single strand of pumpkin vasculature, and come out free of gunk with gentle finger scooping. Dont even have to rinse them off. Then doused with less salt and moar MSG, and dried in the oven at 175F for an hour or so. Then they just get sprayed with olive oil and popped into the air fryer for about 9 minutes at 390, in 3 minute cycles to monitor browning before burning.
I eat them with the hulls on as they are very crispy, and who doesnt need more fiber, nature little brooms! The MSG is also a new wrinkle and a positive experiment.
The pumpkin's gutted corpses were put next to the compost pile for the deer. I went out after dark to see if the deer had noticed that it was dinner time. The herd scattered, after a moment of deer in the headlights, when the flashlight beam startled them, but they came back later. grin

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/15/21 02:59 AM
Processing seafood is a pretty smelly operation however you cut it'

Stinks to high heaven.

But once cleaned and filleted, the flesh of the fish should only smell "of the sea".

There are very few fish that don't taste "of fish" once prepared. Which is not to say fishy in the Red Boat Salt sort of funky goodness...simply "of fish".
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/15/21 03:42 AM
Homemade pulled pork on a toasted sesame bun, with Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce. I prefer the sauces from some local restaurants, but SBR's is easily available at the grocery store and good enough. I would make some fries, but I'm out of potatoes.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/16/21 01:26 AM
Originally Posted by Greger
Processing seafood is a pretty smelly operation however you cut it'

Stinks to high heaven.

But once cleaned and filleted, the flesh of the fish should only smell "of the sea".

There are very few fish that don't taste "of fish" once prepared. Which is not to say fishy in the Red Boat Salt sort of funky goodness...simply "of fish".

I rest my fishy case, your honor!

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/16/21 03:12 AM
Leftover shrimp linguini.

laugh
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/16/21 04:43 AM
Who even knew that shrimp had tongues?

Shrimp are monsters! You are what you eat, and shrimp eat...
TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/16/21 05:17 PM
They used to just be used as fertilizer by white people. But I'm also not frightened by pics of old school fisherpeople doing what they've always done. And I've no issues with consuming their wares.

Back in the days before veganism was even a thing there were a few hippie vegetarians. One of them passed through our kitchen while my dad was eating a steak and said "You are what you eat, Mr. Kyle"

Pop looked up with the hard glare of a hard man and asked "Are you saying I'm a goddammed stupid cow?"

The boy beat a hasty and apologetic retreat.
Posted By: Mellowicious Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 02:19 AM
Catfish are considered “good eatin’l around here and they’re bottom-feeders if there ever were bottom feeders. Used to be common - maybe still is - to put a catfish in the bathtub for a few days to clean them out.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 02:56 AM
Catfish and crawdads, both decidedly non-kosher bottom feeders. Love em when I visit my friends in Louisiana. Best and priciest fish I ever had was one called Speckled Trout in New Orleans.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 03:37 AM
My goto fish is halibut, then sea bass. Can't stand salmon - too full flavored.

smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 05:13 AM
Suck mudbug head or not?

To Suck or Not to Suck? A Definitive Guide to the Most Controversial Crawfish Question

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Pretty much everyone has accepted the deliciousness of boiled crawfish steeped in Cajun spices and butter, but one controversial question remains: Should you suck the heads?

The tiny morsel of edible meat that a crawfish produces is located in its tail. When you’re attending a crawfish boil or eating a pile of mudbugs at a restaurant, many people just pinch off the tail, squeeze out the meat, and eat it, leaving the crawfish head behind. Most people also don’t eat shrimp or lobster heads, for example, which puts crawfish in the same boat as their similarly-shaped cousins.

But those in the know, who really want to get the most out of their mudbugs, put the newly-dismembered crustacean’s head to their lips and take a long slow suck. When you suck on the crawfish head after eating the tail, the crawfish experience becomes truly transcendent. sick “The moisture and the flavor is all in the head,” says Underbelly and One Fifth chef Chris Shepherd. “Yes, the tail is the meat, but the head is the essence of life.”

Like they said heads are controversial
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Seven rules for eating crayfish safely

With June to September being the crayfish season in China, there are occasional news reports about diners falling ill after consuming the delicacy at this time of year. In 2010 dozens of people in Nanjing contracted a rare muscular condition called rhabdomyolysis, also known as Haff disease, which can cause acute renal failure.

To avoid illness, those who crave crayfish should observe the following rules:

1. Do not eat raw crayfish or buy dead ones as histidine, an amino acid, in the creature’s protein cells turns poisonous after they die.

2. Do not eat the heads, as they are a hotbed for parasites; it is best to remove the heads before cooking.

3. Consume the high-protein food with restraint. People prone to allergic conditions, and those with gout, should avoid eating crayfish.
Crayfish must be thoroughly cleaned and well cooked. Photo: Simon Song
Crayfish must be thoroughly cleaned and well cooked. Photo: Simon Song

4. Wash them thoroughly, especially the gills where bacteria gather. Avoid crayfish with gills that are grey or look dirty. Use a brush to clean the shell. The intestines must be removed.

5. The stomach (found near the head) must be removed using scissors after cutting the head.

6. Crayfish must be boiled thoroughly to kill bacteria and germs. Thoroughly cooked crayfish flesh has a crunchy texture.

7. The orange-yellow gloop on the crayfish’s head may look like roe, but is best avoided – this is the crayfish’s digestive gland, containing its liver and pancreas.
This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: claws Célèbre: The invasive species that won over china

TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 05:25 AM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
My goto fish is halibut, then sea bass. Can't stand salmon - too full flavored.

smile
My goto fish for guests is home made fugu, even though I dont eat fish. grin We have lots fewer guests now for one reason or another! Properly prepared it can leave you breathless.


TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 04:46 PM
Quote
Best and priciest fish I ever had was one called Speckled Trout in New Orleans.
Spotted Sea Trout!
Makes me happy to hear that! It's the fish my dad targeted. The one I spent a lifetime fishing for and eating. It's an estuarian fish so it has to be line caught anywhere gillnets are outlawed.

There are a lot of different fish, some may be as good, but none is better than a speckled trout! My brother still brings me some when he has a good day on the Gulf.

Except maybe one. That Sea Bass Rick mentioned. I imagine he's talking about "Chilean Sea Bass" It's a Patagonian Toothfish and it's the best fecking fish I ever sunk a tooth in, bar none. But it's not generally available except in restaurants.

I usually have cod or pollock on hand because it's cheap and perfectly good fish. Mild whitefish, good in any recipe. Mahi Mahi would be my first choice but it's a little pricier.

Salmon is more nutritious, loaded with Omega3 fat. But the fat is where the flavor is!
It's rich and flavorful, almost decadent! Fish shy folks can get their healthy fish fix with cold smoked salmon on a bagel!

TAT can have his bagel with just a schmeer.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/17/21 05:25 PM
Sometimes out in the Gulf, nothing was biting but pufferfish and roleypoleys.

Even a cat won't eat a roleypoley but it turns out the puffers(toadfish) are pretty tasty. Something on the inside is poisonous but if you filet them without gutting them you don't get into it. Don't quote me it's what my parents said.

I have no idea if it's related to Japanese puffers and we have several varieties of them.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 01:33 AM
I ate them ol’ biled taters, an’ I ain’t daid yet. Thot y’all’d like ter know…
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 03:06 AM
YEAH, except now your speeling has improved to my level.
Dont eat green meet!

One of the more bizarre Procol songs, and one of the few on that mind boggling album that doesnt make one consider suicide. grin
Or Quayle Potatoes

AAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 03:35 AM
Originally Posted by Greger
Sometimes out in the Gulf, nothing was biting but pufferfish and roleypoleys.

Even a cat won't eat a roleypoley but it turns out the puffers(toadfish) are pretty tasty. Something on the inside is poisonous but if you filet them without gutting them you don't get into it. Don't quote me it's what my parents said.

I have no idea if it's related to Japanese puffers and we have several varieties of them.

Pufferfish are like mushrooms, some will kill you others wont, thus the excitement!
Quote
Even a cat won't eat a roleypoley
I resemble that remark, so I had to look up Roleypoley and all I could come up with was a giant sea bug
and possibly the worst song ever! We should consider a thread elsewhere listing what we think are the worst songs ever, in each catagorry, and explain our judgement.
You were worned!


roleypoley fish heads
This version is much moar...
Oh CARP, the software wouldnt let me post this as an edit to last version!
TAT


TAT
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 04:07 AM
In Japan, fugu chefs have to be well-trained and then licensed, because so many people eating badly-prepared puffer fish die from the neurotoxin. They say you know you've found a good chef when you just get the tingles after eating it.

I love sea bass. salmon. and pollack. We get a lot of Alaskan pollack in California because it hasn't all been fished out yet. Shrimp is a big favorite, too. We used to be able to find spiny lobster when diving, but they are pretty rare now. Last one I caught was decades ago, and I caught it on a line fishing from a jetty!
Posted By: Jeffery J. Haas Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 04:10 AM
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
In Japan, fugu chefs have to be well-trained and then licensed, because so many people eating badly-prepared puffer fish die from the neurotoxin. They say you know you've found a good chef when you just get the tingles after eating it.

Yeah well, let em train in the kitchens of Steve Bannon and Roger Stone.
Foods that bite you back are Franken-foodz. eek2
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 04:59 AM
Sue Chefs! mad

TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 04:34 PM
Whatever I end up having for dinner tonight, there will be biochar in my pepper grinder!

Dairy farmer finds biochar boosts cow health. It seems clear that Black Food Matters, but presentation counts, so maybe biochar should not be added while cooking, except for black rice, but sprinkled on top mixed with pepper. Who would notice?

TAT

Quote
It was a lucky accident of sorts for dairy producer Aaron Smith.

A broken bag of biochar inside his barn allowed his cows to sample the powdery black charcoal when it spread on the floor near the feeder.

“As we were sweeping it up, the cows all came over and next thing you know, two or three of them were actually eating mouthfuls of it, which I had not expected,” said Smith, the owner of Don-Mair Farms near Mount Hope, Ont.
“I thought the palatability of it would probably deter them from doing it, but actually one by one they would all get a mouthful of it and walk away and go stand off to the side chewing on it like they were chewing on dirt out in the pasture,” said Smith.

“We observed that it was the recently fresh cows that were consuming it by the mouthful.”

Smith operates a 75-head milking herd of purebred registered Holsteins on his 500-acre dairy farm.

He recently completed a one-year trial where activated charcoal was used in his calf starter and dairy ration. He recounted the results during a recent webinar about activated charcoal and herd health in Canada.

Quote
More recently its environmental benefits have been discovered because cows that eat biochar produce less methane.

Studies have also found that when added to animal feed, initially as a colourant, biochar allows animals to recover more quickly from illness, with less need for antibiotics. Dairy cattle also produce more milk and the barns smell better.

Armed with this knowledge, Smith conducted a trial with his Holsteins.

“I put two and two together that if it’s a full pass-through product, it’s kind of like getting double bang for your buck. It’s like dumping a bag of charcoal out in your field, but first it goes through the cows. So it helps their gut and promotes overall better health by pulling toxins out of their system.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 05:33 PM
Roleypoley was a local name, also called cigarfish and snakefish. It's trash fish and I don't know the real name. It isn't one of those either. After they bite, they spin and twist up your line hence roleypoleys.

Fish isn't really a natural food for cats.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 08:53 PM
Round Scad recipe

I this the hard to research RoleyPoley?

Quote
Fish isn't really a natural food for cats.

This is reasonable as domestic cats are derived from Egyptian desert cats. Fish are, however, considered excellent for sport fishing. Just ask my irritable neighbor who was not amused by one of our notorious predators fishing in her Coy pond! nono This was only after she, the cat, had depleted the entire extended neighborhood of Chipmunks, her favorite! Some neighbors, who were gardeners, approved of this carnage as Chipmunks dig out and eat their bulbs. Still Chipmunks have positive PR and some want them around. They are starting to return to our yard, 10 years later. Trudy was a Calico, a breed that former Att Gen Ashcroft considered demonic, and had the secret service scout area for Calicos before his appearances. Chipmunks would agree with Ashcroft!
All that Trudy wouldnt eat was the stomach and intestines that contained veggies. Cougars also eschew deer stomachs filled with salad.

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/18/21 11:15 PM
Salmon, black rice, asparagus.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/19/21 02:49 AM
Red beans and rice, not black, but at least brown, with Andouille sausage. I did consider using black rice but it didnt fit the sudden schedule, and it would have hidden the red and green Christmas colors. I added a healthy dose of live collards, the only thing left alive in the veggie garden. Collards like other greens are even sweeter after the gentle kiss of the frost grin eat your heart out folks without that winter gardening pleasure and advantage!
These particular Collard plants are now two years old. I planted new ones in the spring but some dastardly Vegan bugs ate all my bedding plants. I rushed around looking for more plants but they were sold out.. Considering a year without collards, I figured my only chance was to encourage the remaining plants, they usually live through winter here now, to produce more leaves. The plants had spring fever and were blooming very enthusiastically, thinking that it would be their only chance to breed and sow wild oats. Every sprout, and there were hundreds, had clusters of bright yellow flowers but had stopped growing leaves. I pruned all the flowers, which are delicious eaten right in the garden or used like any other green. They kept trying to flower but I purrsisted in deflowering them. I fed them high nitrogen lawn fertilizer, without weed killer, that was leftover from when I used to feed the lawn. High nitrogen encourages leaf growth, and I didnt want more Potassium or Phosphate as they already had good root systems, and were not going to produce fruit. They came back with lush growth, but instead of being upright as usual, they crawled snakelike all around the plot putting out more collards than I could eat, and they are still going strong. I think I will try to get another year out of them, with severe contraception! grin

TAT
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/19/21 06:41 AM
Maybe throw some straw on top of them for over-wintering? Might keep them from freezing so hard when the snow comes. I assume global warming has not progressed to the point you are frost-free. I've only seen it snow here for a few minutes twice in my life, but I did spend a year in West Lafayette, Indiana. And I've skied some of the best Eastern Sierra slopes when I was young.

I've decided to try and duplicate Popeye's Red Beans & Rice. Found some recipes to try. One interesting factoid is they don't use ANY ham, sausage, or any other meat at all. They use bacon grease and liquid smoke! One experiment I used Great Northern beans, roast pork fat, and liquid smoke. Okay, but no cigar. I want to try authentic small red beans, but with olive oil and liquid smoke. That would make for a healthier version, but if doesn't pass my test I will get some bacon to render.

Biscuits and ham gravy tonight, with little sausage cubes in the gravy.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/19/21 12:52 PM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Whatever I end up having for dinner tonight, there will be biochar in my pepper grinder!

Dairy farmer finds biochar boosts cow health. It seems clear that Black Food Matters, but presentation counts, so maybe biochar should not be added while cooking, except for black rice, but sprinkled on top mixed with pepper. Who would notice?
The Majick of biochar! It has been used as a feed supplement for poultry and livestock in Southeast Asia for years, though it’s still not approved by the FDA in the U.S. There was a NRCS CIG grant funded project in Nebraska a couple of years ago that had the objective of paving the way for legal acceptance of biochar in feed, but I haven’t heard anything about the results. We make it available to our chickens.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/19/21 04:31 PM
Quote
I've decided to try and duplicate Popeye's Red Beans & Rice.

I don't know exactly what a "red bean" is. So I looked it up and found this article:
The Difference Between Red, Pinto, And Kidney Beans

If you click on that you will see a picture of Kidney beans and Pinto beans. But no "Red Beans".
Great Northern beans are white beans and I seriously love them.

But for beans and rice I've always used Pintos. Canned is fine, they need at least another hour of cooking anyway.

And you probably already have it in your mise but the next ingredient is Tony Chachere's Original Creole Seasoning. If you don't have it get some! It's the secret ingredient of chefs and home cooks worldwide.
(So is Red Boat Fish Salt, but we won't go there so's not to make the kitty puke)
Popeye's probably has a proprietary blend but Tony's is the industry standard.

Save yourself the bacon rendering and just buy a little pack of pre-cooked bacon and chop it up.

Due to the Pandemic and global supply issues there is a glut of Tunesian Olive Oil right now and it can be had for cheap! Tunesia is on the southern shore of the Meditteranean and produces some of the world's finest.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/19/21 11:56 PM
Light Red Kidney Beans

Adding to the confusion and ambeanuity are these Light Red Kidney Beans that I carefully selected from my beaner stash as they were smaller and more likely to cook quickly than the only other colored choice Red Kidney Beans,
Red Kidney Beans
which were larger and redder. I also had white northern beans, but I thought they would not have a nice color contrast with the rice, though brown, not white on rice. I failed to consider another contrast option, white beans on black rice, kind of a reverse of Ebony on Ivory, which was never well received in Southern cuisine.

I rinsed them minimally, and covered them in my aluminum pressure cooker (a weddding gift) with about 2 inches of water with a generous rounded teaspoon of MSG and a similar amount of salt. I brought them immediately to jiggling temp for 2 minutes, and turned off the stove and left them on the glass non-induction cooktop that has considerable latent heat, and left them there for an hour or so. I was going to go with gas in the kitchen remodel but ran out of time to run a gas line, and didnt want to rush it cause what could go worng with a hasty gas job and no permit for it? The beans could have used another 1/2 of water but were almost done, and did take up most of the MSG brine, which was the experiment da jour. All they needed was a 30 min simmer with the other ingredients. I did NOTpour off the bean broth or sell it to Vegans.
We can discuss bean pressure cooking that is a real time savor particularly with added MSG. I rarely plan far enough ahead of time to soak beans overnight, and after doing the quick boil and rest for an hour before pressure cooking, I though I would try this way and it worked. Some beans, like chickpeas, need more time to soften their peafowl consistency grin
TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/20/21 02:28 PM
Canned beans are fine. No need to gum up a pressure cooker in an attempt to save time and rush through the cooking part. Just open a goddam can of beans.

Red Kidney beans are still kidney beans and are not traditionally used in beans and rice.

They work fine for chili and a few other recipes but fail to provide the creaminess of red beans or pintos. Red beans are available online and at some(better) grocery stores.

No matter what you're cooking substituting the wrong ingredients will never yield the best results. Rushing through a recipe, failing to plan ahead, and taking shortcuts will also lead to less than optimal results.
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/22/21 07:19 PM
I've been thinking about savory pancakes for a long time...I think there's a variety of different Asian versions that mostly involve scallions.

Finally tried it this morning and it was a come to Jesus moment!

Sauteed a chopped scallion, some mushrooms and a small colorful pepper in butter for a few minutes, added a handful of chopped spinach just long enough to wilt, then added it to some Kroger brand pancake mix along with some herbs and spices and poured the batter into a pan of hot herb and garlic infused EVOO.

It was breakfast so I served it with two Sunnyside eggs on top and sliced tomato.

Glorious!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/22/21 09:15 PM
I suspect that all the MSG, yeast, schroom and Umami chatter around here has subliminally lead us down the savory path. Yesterday while eating more "red" beans with rice I was running through masa based shortbreads that go so well with beans that reflect light around the 700 nano meter wavelengths. I found some savory corn breadish cheesy muffins, but was looking for something that didnt require baking. I found Savory Masa Corn Cakes with Green Chile, Cheese, and Lime Crema that looked like a good start for something to mix with the beans or use as layers between bean strata. Think blueberry pancakes except with beans.

I hesitat to get into the very controversial subject about the only authentic or traditional way to make cornbread, for today, but I'm feeling a bit of a deja vu re cornbread here. I will look it up and see who won.

The Hell with unsavory! Though some purrsist in leading us into temptation, which isn't so bad, grin
if only they could deliver us from EVOO! devil

I's repentin Lawd
TAT
Posted By: olyve Re: What's for dinner? - 11/23/21 01:15 AM
Quote
I hesitat to get into the very controversial subject about the only authentic or traditional way to make cornbread, for today, but I'm feeling a bit of a deja vu re cornbread here. I will look it up and see who won.
Oh ok....ROTFMOL

Beans and peas are a big part of our diet. I love them! I cook almost exclusively from dried beans/peas and I like to do it in a small slow cooker. No pre soaking or fast boil. The creamiest way to make them. Anywhere from 3 hours to 6 depending on the bean.
I always keep on hand, red beans, pinto beans, navy beans, great northern bean, black beans, kidney beans, garbanzo beans (great in soups and salads) and last but no where near the least, black eyed peas, my very favorite.

I have a fantastic red beans and rice recipe....red beans, onion, celery, bell pepper, garlic, bag leaves, cayenne, Cajun seasoning (see Greger's suggestion above), parsley, and most of all sage...in my opinion, the most important. I've made it with andouille sausage and with no meat at all. (we were meat free for a long time, now we're meat less). I also might put a splash of sherry in.
I cook this in the slow cooker. Toe curling good!

Hey Tat, I grow collards year around here too. What you say, so right about wintertime collards!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/23/21 05:14 AM
Originally Posted by olyve
Quote
I hesitat to get into the very controversial subject about the only authentic or traditional way to make cornbread, for today, but I'm feeling a bit of a deja vu re cornbread here. I will look it up and see who won.
Oh ok....ROTFMOL

Beans and peas are a big part of our diet. I love them! I cook almost exclusively from dried beans/peas and I like to do it in a small slow cooker. No pre soaking or fast boil. The creamiest way to make them. Anywhere from 3 hours to 6 depending on the bean.
I always keep on hand, red beans, pinto beans, navy beans, great northern bean, black beans, kidney beans, garbanzo beans (great in soups and salads) and last but no where near the least, black eyed peas, my very favorite.

I have a fantastic red beans and rice recipe....red beans, onion, celery, bell pepper, garlic, bag leaves, cayenne, Cajun seasoning (see Greger's suggestion above), parsley, and most of all sage...in my opinion, the most important. I've made it with andouille sausage and with no meat at all. (we were meat free for a long time, now we're meat less). I also might put a splash of sherry in.
I cook this in the slow cooker. Toe curling good!

Hey Tat, I grow collards year around here too. What you say, so right about wintertime collards!

Hi Olyve,
I knew there had to other beanophiles out there! I have considered starting a new thread, but have been looking for just the right title for it. Should it be "You don't know beans!" or "KILLER BEANS, RED KIDNEY ALERT!!"?
Having been unjustly accused of offtopic or even worse Hijack purrhaps it would be better to take it elsewhere, but since the actual topic is explicitly "What's for dinner?" it would be appropriate for me,
it happens,grin to continue here as beans are very frequently included in my dinner, particularly with dried beans that provide so many leftovers compared to cans.
Re: Killer beans, there were 50 or so cases of kidney bean poisoning/toxicity reported in Britain between 1980-90 that were recognized to be due to raw or under-cooked kidney beans. This wont kill you, but can cause GI distress, from end to end, with possible dehydration needing IV fluid replacementKiller beans toxicity, symptoms, treatment, and prevention
There have been particular concerns about low temp slow cookers, that on low heats may not reach a high enough temperature to destroy the toxin phytohemaglutinin, that we call PHA for short, and use ut in the lab to stimulate lymphocytes to divide. Kidney beans have some of the highest levels of it, but other beans also have it.
I have never noticed a problem, but I dont use a slow cooker for beans. I would be interested in the details about what you call a small slow cooker, brand model, and the temperatures that you use. If it boils part of the time, like 10-15 minutes or more, that may explain why you haven' noticed any GI problem with it.
Curiously, poorly cooked beans, may have 5 fold increases in toxicity, compared to raw beans, as the toxin can be released from the beans, but not destroyed by the low heat.
Pressure cooking seems from my experiment to be OK even with short high pressure times and temps, but I haven't tried it the the large red kidney beans that have the most toxin. 4-5 beans poorly cooked can cause symptoms. I'm considering testing pressure cooking the Big Reds, but not when I'm going out.
Greger is missing out, but safe with his canned beans, as that canning process destroys the toxin. Otherwise we wouldnt be able to eat kidney beans right out of the can, when camping, or mimicking cowboys on the trail.
Most slow cooker recipes that I have seem lately, use canned bean, or soaked boiled beans.

As for wintering collards, Athens, greater Hotlanta, has winters that used to be a bit different from Syracuse, and in fact when I just looked outside, it was suddenly white.
Moar BEANS ThumbsUp

TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/23/21 11:02 PM
Pozole, using canned Goya White Hominy. grin

Olyve expressed a strong prefurance for sage in her bean dishes, and will try it, except I associate it with Turkey stuffing. Many Mexican sites praise Epazote as the essential seasoning for authentic Mexican bean dishes, but I have not been able to find a good source for it, and even searched for seed. Most epazote seed sellers had terrible reviews on the viability of epazote seeds. It is characterized as a highly invasive plant, so if only if I could get a few sprout-able seeds, I could share it with ALL of my neighbors, who watch my experiments with amusement, and reasonable alarm.
Epazote
Anybody know a good dealer or have experience with epazote?

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/23/21 11:21 PM
Ribs and a loaded baked potato.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/23/21 11:44 PM
I think it's merciful to not eat a sober potato, and I also feel for anything battered or blackened!

TAT
Posted By: olyve Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 01:43 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Pozole, using canned Goya White Hominy. grin

Olyve expressed a strong prefurance for sage in her bean dishes, and will try it, except I associate it with Turkey stuffing.

TAT
Sage = creole. Not Mexican. Not all beans! I use other appropriate herbs with Mexican I promise. We have fantastic Mexican grocery stores and restaurants.
I also make a fabulous vegetarian Sage and Onions gravy. I love sage but don't use it often. When I do......wow.
If I'm just making beans, not ethnic, standard in onion, bay leaf, organo, thyme, maybe some cumin.

But let me go back.
I have NEVER heard that about the dangers of kidney beans! Kidney beans are the beans we eat the least (only because we love the others so much). I'm hoping that my "southerness" is why we haven't had any trouble so far. Beans gotta be cooked all the way!

My small slow cooker I think is maybe 1.5/2 quarts Toastmaster. It's old...20 years at least. (I'd show a picture but damn it's stained from all them black beans and kind of beat up! Not eye candy at all). I can cook 2 split chicken breasts in it easily.
It's very simple. It doesn't even have an off and on button. Plug it in and go. My best guess is it's only cooking temp is high (of course that's by slow cooker standards).

Lol, Athens has tried (and mostly succeeded) in NOT being part of greater Hotalanta (home of my birth and growing up). Not because we don't like Atlanta. There's a LOT of interaction between us. Atlanta is mostly a very cool place. Fun and eclectic.
Athens is another one of those places that is fighting to keep our own weird identity and keep it affordable for all the artistic rascals.
Posted By: olyve Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 01:50 AM
White beans and sausage

The comments are illuminating.
I don't use pre cooked sausage. Various house made ones. This is good!
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 05:06 PM
Kroger was sold out of turkey TV dinners so it looks like I'm having hot dogs tomorrow.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 06:39 PM
Oh Greger, frown
That sounds like a sincere cry for help after a tragic loss,
similar to "Think I'll go eat worms!" frown

To the rescue, not roscoe, VEGAN TURDUCKEN

So Sorry
TAT

Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 08:36 PM
Epazote

You can buy it at Latin markets here in my neck. It’s apparently very easy to grow but I’ve never grown it. Si haces frijoles refritos es necesita usar manteca y epazote con algo más cosas. Pero algunas personas no quieren comer manteca. Es un lastima.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/24/21 11:12 PM
Gloria a Manteca! Bow
Praise the Lard
Tat
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/25/21 04:37 AM
Greek takeout: Hummus, falafel, gyros. chicken skewers, rice pilaf, Greek salad, and baklava. Have not had Greek food in forever.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/25/21 08:19 PM
Traditional Turkey thanksgiving, except I spatchcocked the turkey. No problems removing the backbone, tail, and wing tips, but I ran into a few anatomical problems removing the pelvis and parts of the sternum. They have wings and legs attached to them! Who knew?

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/25/21 11:31 PM
Spatchcocking only requires the removal of the backbone and quick punch to break the breast bone. Anything beyond that is elective surgery.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 12:17 AM
We had street tacos for Thanksgiving feast up at the cabin today - Mexican spiced ground beef with a garnish of homemade pico de gallo and sliced avocado on double tiny flour tortillas. Did the turkey thing last Sunday.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 12:35 AM
Yeah I knew that, but old autopsy routines are hard to shake, and I figured I might have been able to bill for the elective radical surgery. It was a bigger bird (20 lbs) than I thought, and required garden pruning shears, as the kitchen ones were not up to the task. The longer I beat on it, CPR, the wider it got and I had to use my full size sheet pan with cooling grid as it wouldn't fit in my roasting pan, even after trimming the wings again!
It only took 2 hours to cook, 450 for 20-30 minutes till lightly browned, and then foiled and 325 while monitoring temps. I ended up removing the legs and wings anyway, to get the breast to 150-155 for five minutes without over cooking the extremities, the reverse of the usual problem. It was nicely browned and moist, and nobody has had GI distress, yet!
We were stuffed, but stopped before it was painful. We voted to not prepare decadent desserts for only the three of us, still losing our covid extra pounds. Having leftover pie would have been irrational!

How were the hotdogs? frown
TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 01:55 AM
My nieces brought me a plate from their dinner across town. I bought a turkey but it's languishing in the freezer because the only one I would share it with is somewhere on the Mediterranean aboard a cruise ship celebrating her retirement. Maybe I'll save it for Yuletide feasting, or maybe I'll break it down and do it sous vide in air fryer sized chunks. That has proven to be remarkably efficient in cooking for one or two with some leftovers. I'd do legs, wings, thighs, and breasts separately in quart bags, then make bone broth from the carcass.
That's a lot of meals in the freezer for $.49 a pound. Last month I got an 8-pound pork butt for cheap and did that...still two nice pieces left.
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 01:58 AM
i didn't have any sugar in the house to make whipped-cream from scratch, and I didn't want to buy any because, if I have lived here since the end of August and not needed sugar until now, I pro'lly don't need it.

So I used pure maple syrup to sweeten the whipped cream for the pumpkin pie. It turned-out fantastic!!! The pumpkin pie and maple-flavored whipped cream go so well together. smile
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 02:42 AM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
i didn't have any sugar in the house to make whipped-cream from scratch, and I didn't want to buy any because, if I have lived here since the end of August and not needed sugar until now, I pro'lly don't need it.

So I used pure maple syrup to sweeten the whipped cream for the pumpkin pie. It turned-out fantastic!!! The pumpkin pie and maple-flavored whipped cream go so well together. smile

You were out of Aquafaba??!!! nono What a world, what a world! grin
Tat
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 02:51 AM
Oh Yes! A match made in heaven!

I ordered a pecan pie last week but it was out of stock and the item substitution algorithm failed to come up with any possible substitution like apple, cherry, peach. lemon, coconut, custard, pumpkin, key lime or rhubarb? I don't need the sugar anyway...My doctor has tasked me with reducing my A1c over the holidays...assh*le.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 02:58 AM
Originally Posted by Greger
My nieces brought me a plate from their dinner across town. I bought a turkey but it's languishing in the freezer because the only one I would share it with is somewhere on the Mediterranean aboard a cruise ship celebrating her retirement. Maybe I'll save it for Yuletide feasting, or maybe I'll break it down and do it sous vide in air fryer sized chunks. That has proven to be remarkably efficient in cooking for one or two with some leftovers. I'd do legs, wings, thighs, and breasts separately in quart bags, then make bone broth from the carcass.
That's a lot of meals in the freezer for $.49 a pound. Last month I got an 8-pound pork butt for cheap and did that...still two nice pieces left.

I was roasting the various parts removed by gratuitous over-spatchcocking, rolleyes but the low temp 325, on a rack underneath the turkey was not providing the drippings I needed for gravy and stuffing. I put the pieces parts, including the tail, into the air fryer that browned them nicely and quickly. Time being of the essence, I then took the brown parts and pressure cooked them for 10 minutes to get a very rich brown gravy stock, that worked just fine. No need to roux the day! And, no need to ask "whats for dinner?" for quite a while.

TAT
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 04:17 PM
I love your punny posts. laugh
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 05:38 PM
Originally Posted by pdx rick
I love your punny posts. laugh
And wee your puny doggerel grin
But shun the angry mongrel mad
Just be a nice feller smile
Don't go like "ole Yeller" nono

TAT
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 11:06 PM
Spatchcockiing makes a very nice turkey, but indeed the problem is finding a pan that's large enough. Basically, you turn a three story house into a sprawling ranch mega-mansion. Even cooking is fast and the meat comes out great. Just don't buy the usual 20 pounder and expect it to fit in your standard oven. I do have a smoker it would fit in. Hmmmm.....
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 11:35 PM
The ridiculous concept is that keeping a turkey in one topological construct, is some kind of absburdist religion. This was only an experiment to show the ridiculosity of the concept. Just amputat the wings and legs and cook them in the same oven, but monitor their temps, with the readily available instant read thermometers! Its so simple the cave critters probably understood it! Ugg dear, why didn't you watch those legs better? Drumsticks were only a concept of the future!

TAT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/26/21 11:39 PM
What did the drumsticks say?

Rat-a-tat-tat!!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/27/21 12:41 AM
Originally Posted by logtroll
What did the drumsticks say?

Rat-a-tat-tat!!
How do you play a DrumTroll?

It's all about the bounce!
TaT
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/27/21 12:52 AM
If you ever find yourself upside down, it can be life-saving to master this roll!
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/27/21 01:14 AM
MIT had a contest for ultranerds every year, deriving the equations for exceptionally difficult physics problems. One of the toughest was figuring out the physics equations for righting an upside down Kayak! I should have payed more attention as most of my time in Kayaks is spent as a submariner.

If you've got um, roll um said the Bipolar Bear while chomping into his Eskimo roll,

TAT
.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/27/21 11:56 PM
I was the only student in my Canoe and Kayak class to learn the Eskimo Roll. Pretty easy if you have a paddle. Impossible if you dropped it. You can get ready for it by tipping sideways, and then up-righting yourself with the right paddle stroke. That's the same stroke you use underwater to get yourself sideways. It doesn't take much effort to move yourself from upside-down to sideways. The harder feat is getting up from sideways.

It was easy for me because I had already done a lot of snorkeling, and had completed a diver certification class. (San Diego State had some terrific PE classes way back then.) I wore a facemask to learn it, so I had no fear or panic being submerged. The instructor didn't even demonstrate it. He just showed me how to move the paddle.

Interesting factoid: Eskimos almost never do the roll accidentally. They use it to cool off from the hot arctic summer sun.
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/28/21 12:15 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
If you've got um, roll um said the Bipolar Bear while chomping into his Eskimo roll.
[Linked Image from 64.media.tumblr.com]
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/28/21 01:08 AM
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Round Scad recipe

I this the hard to research RoleyPoley?

Quote
Fish isn't really a natural food for cats.

This is reasonable as domestic cats are derived from Egyptian desert cats. Fish are, however, considered excellent for sport fishing. Just ask my irritable neighbor who was not amused by one of our notorious predators fishing in her Coy pond! nono This was only after she, the cat, had depleted the entire extended neighborhood of Chipmunks, her favorite! Some neighbors, who were gardeners, approved of this carnage as Chipmunks dig out and eat their bulbs. Still Chipmunks have positive PR and some want them around. They are starting to return to our yard, 10 years later. Trudy was a Calico, a breed that former Att Gen Ashcroft considered demonic, and had the secret service scout area for Calicos before his appearances. Chipmunks would agree with Ashcroft!
All that Trudy wouldnt eat was the stomach and intestines that contained veggies. Cougars also eschew deer stomachs filled with salad.

TAT

A note in added proof of Trudy the Terrible whose Chipmunk executions inspired me to plagiarize Marlowe's immortal phrase about Helen of Troy's face that launched a thousand ships into the Trojan wars!
https://hosting.photobucket.com/albums/b66/Tatuma/trudy5.jpg
This would not have been remembered without the recent post related to passages through the Ileum and Odyssey
The long lost photobucket image from Critter corner appears to not have kicked it.
TAT
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 12:17 AM
Turkey wild rice soup.
Turkey cranberry salsa tacos.

Turkey
Again
Tommorow
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 01:17 AM
In spite of what Ken-san says, I am having more than bread and water tonight - we're having stir-fry oriental noodles!
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 02:58 AM
Mushroom risotto with thyme

smile
Posted By: pdx rick Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 02:59 AM
Originally Posted by logtroll
In spite of what Ken-san says, I am having more than bread and water tonight - we're having stir-fry oriental noodles!

Top Ramen?

laugh
Posted By: logtroll Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 03:45 AM
Over the top … it’s those fat noodles.
Posted By: Ken Condon Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 05:33 AM
Those would be chow fun noodles. Chow is always more fun with fat noodles.
Posted By: pondering_it_all Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 09:16 AM
Didn't buy a turkey this year. Our freezer is full. If I want a turkey fix, I'll just go down to The Chicken Pie Shop in San Diego. They have a turkey & chicken pie that's to die for. So much meat in it, you need some gravy on the side just to dip each bite in. They've been serving those since 1938! I've been going there since I was a kid.
Posted By: TatumAH Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 04:05 PM
Great idea, thanks!
It will be Turkey Pot Pie Night, using those anatomically vague pieces-parts! If only I could find enough Manteca for the crust and to make roux for more gravey.

This is a the easy time of year when you rarely need freezer space, as a shelf in the garage is the purrfect fridge, and the table on the porch is the extended freezer.
You have to keep an eye on the garage temp to protect the beer stash from freezing, but the tequila is a safe backup.

TAT
Posted By: Greger Re: What's for dinner? - 11/30/21 11:09 PM
Lentil pasta, vegetables, and a creamy pink sauce.
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