Capitol Hill Blue
Ever hear of the Climate Reality Project? It's something Al Gore started a couple of years ago. One of the things they proudly present on their website is that a their primary function is to educate folks about climate change. I got past all the "donate here" stuff and got ahold of a real person and asked what sorts of things they offer to educate people about what they can do.

They said that there are many ways of protesting and lobbying politicians to strengthen regulations about greenhouse gas production. I asked if there was any direct action that people could take to sequester CO2, and if they were interested - they told me they didn't get into that sort of thing.

Do people really not care about things they can do in their ordinary lives to reverse global warming?
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Do people really not care about things they can do in their ordinary lives to reverse global warming?

Have you looked around and seen how people are running in circles trying to keep up with a world that's spinning too fast? people DO care, they just don't have time to think about it.

The mitigation of climate change is going to have to be a warlike effort if we are to succeed.
I've spent the money to get my carbon footprint pretty low. Solar power, Prius, no airline flights or cruises, growing veggies, getting chickens, etc. Not all of those will work out, but overall they will.
I support Bovine Beano Project to control bio-methane. Some seaweeds and lemongrass inhibit methane production. One little problem is that cow prefer to not eat it.


[url=https://www.popularmechani...ane-climate-change/]Bovine Beano project


Considering this while rebuilding, again, the carburetor on 1984 Craftsman! I have a corded electric also but am tiring of cord topology! https://www.lowes.com/pd/EGO-Push-M..._-mdv-_-gdy-_-all-_-10692520-_-29332-_-0




I just bought a cordless Ryobi pole saw for my wife for Mother's Day. {She's childless, so she gets power tools.) I'm amazed how well an 8" chainsaw works on such a little battery. The best part is it's the same battery as my drill, so we now have two batteries and two fast chargers, so we can easily recharge while working. The bad part is we have no excuse to take long breaks.
Originally Posted by Greger
Have you looked around and seen how people are running in circles trying to keep up with a world that's spinning too fast? people DO care, they just don't have time to think about it.

The mitigation of climate change is going to have to be a warlike effort if we are to succeed.
Maybe it’s not the world spinning too fast - could be that we are aimlessly running ever faster and not getting anywhere. Red Queen Syndrome.

I’m working on fomenting a Civilian Climate Corps “pilot project” in my community. AKA “Things You Can Do” to fight climate change. The meat of it will spin around ecological restoration and increasing soil carbon while displacing fossil fuel burning - without dramatic scare mongering and perceived threats to “lifestyle”.

What we have is a cultural problem, and people are notoriously resistant to change, even when the change is an improvement. Especially when the prevailing ideas of change involve giving up something. (I see a correlation to “Conservative” politics of today, not wanting to change, or give up Trump, no matter how destructive it becomes).

Cultural change will only come by carrot, or by stick - I see a carrot opportunity in the new CCC movement. But I’m not at all assured that the new CCC can be effectively mobilized in a top down government format without creating some examples of what it would look like. The way people live today is not like it was in the 1930’s, and I don’t see that putting a million young men to work at hard physical labor is going to be the core of the program.

But the soil carbon approach is astoundingly multi-faceted in the activities it entails - from science and policy to strategies and techniques to widespread benefits and social justice. And it doesn’t begin with having to give up anything, though I expect it will result in us happily giving up a lot of stuff as it evolves.

My community has educated and experienced people with 20-30 years experience in all of the related fields of expertise, so my CCC pilot project is to get us better organized and get some participation from our political “leaders” (difficulty #1 is to convince them to follow us...). Instead of waiting for a dysfunctional and awkward government program to materialize that will be “managed” by an army of bureaucrats who have very little understanding of what needs to be done, I hope to have communities like mine show the way.
Got a couple of Lynx?
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Got a couple of Lynx?
Ratz! I gnu I was forgetting something... Joe's climate E.O.
Had to read through 213 to find it.

CCC Lynx explanation in English

EMPOWERING WORKERS BY ADVANCING CONSERVATION, AGRICULTURE, AND REFORESTATION

Sec. 214. Policy. It is the policy of my Administration to put a new generation of Americans to work conserving our public lands and waters. The Federal Government must protect America’s natural treasures, increase reforestation, improve access to recreation, and increase resilience to wildfires and storms, while creating well-paying union jobs for more Americans, including more opportunities for women and people of color in occupations where they are underrepresented. America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners have an important role to play in combating the climate crisis and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, by sequestering carbon in soils, grasses, trees, and other vegetation and sourcing sustainable bioproducts and fuels. Coastal communities have an essential role to play in mitigating climate change and strengthening resilience by protecting and restoring coastal ecosystems, such as wetlands, seagrasses, coral and oyster reefs, and mangrove and kelp forests, to protect vulnerable coastlines, sequester carbon, and support biodiversity and fisheries.

Sec. 215. Civilian Climate Corps. In furtherance of the policy set forth in section 214 of this order, the Secretary of the Interior, in collaboration with the Secretary of Agriculture and the heads of other relevant agencies, shall submit a strategy to the Task Force within 90 days of the date of this order for creating a Civilian Climate Corps Initiative, within existing appropriations, to mobilize the next generation of conservation and resilience workers and maximize the creation of accessible training opportunities and good jobs. The initiative shall aim to conserve and restore public lands and waters, bolster community resilience, increase reforestation, increase carbon sequestration in the agricultural sector, protect biodiversity, improve access to recreation, and address the changing climate.
Covid, see fewer people , shower less

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Robin Harper, an administrative assistant at a preschool on Martha’s Vineyard, grew up showering every day.

“It’s what you did,” she said. But when the coronavirus pandemic forced her indoors and away from the general public, she started showering once a week.

The new practice felt environmentally virtuous, practical and freeing. And it has stuck.


This is an easy and reasonable way to cut down energy usages. My policy during the pre-immunization phase, was to grocery shop once a week, and shower after returning and cleansing the provisions for the week. This also removed residual Chlorox, though I didnt find handling 10% without gloves to be a problem except for a little dryness.

I figured nobody would recognize me wearing a mask anyway. I also figured that if they violated my social distancing space I would give them a clear olfactory warning.

Frankly daily showers are very drying to the skin and many dermatologist agree that Americans are over-washed.
This was no problem during the winter, but will probably have to be modified with the sweaty summer yard work protocol.

TaT
In colder weather that could work, but in Southern California I can skip showering one night but I feel a little scrungy in the morning. Put on deodorant over old deodorant feels nasty. Skipping two nights would not work at all. For one thing, my sheets would develop a very distinct BO stink.

I suppose my dogs would like it, they tend to roll in coyote poop or anything sufficiently stinky. My wife wouldn't.
Skipping showers probably works best when you live alone.

I live alone.

I stopped driving altogether and gave away my car.

Meat consumption is drastically reduced as eggs continue to be my main source of protein.

Just installed a natural gas tankless water heater.

Just downsized from a 2100sqft to an 1100sqft house.

I recycle carefully. Many plastics are best sent to the landfill.

Planning to switch to induction cooking soon and get a more efficient oven.

Considering solar but it's a shady industry here so I'm waiting for things to change.

Carbon footprints are expensive, each time I reduce mine I have more money in my pocket.
Originally Posted by logtroll
I’m working on fomenting a Civilian Climate Corps “pilot project” in my community. AKA “Things You Can Do” to fight climate change. The meat of it will spin around ecological restoration and increasing soil carbon while displacing fossil fuel burning - without dramatic scare mongering and perceived threats to “lifestyle”.

Spent half of Friday and all day Saturday at a "Climathon" workshop. The focus was on composting food and other biological 'waste' as a means to deal with global warming. About 30 people attended, which is pretty good for a small community like mine. During the course of the event we divided up into teams to compete for prize money for the best project idea. My team took first, sharing $800, and the project was my Civilian Climate Corps concept. The best part was that it was a chance for me to present the idea to a large group of locals and to recruit collaborating participants. We'll also be guests on a one hour radio program later this week to pitch the project.
Passive solar hot water has been very common in Florida for decades, but very hard to do if you live in rental or multiunit property. I've bought some induction hotplates on Amazon lately. They are incredibly cheap, and have some amazing capabilities. You can set them for time or a maximum temperature, so they might be able to do sous vide all by themselves! Or not burn your food. They are also faster than gas or electric cooktops! It's true. I saw a real-time test on YouTube where a guy boiled the same size pot of water with a great big gas burner and with a <$100 induction hotplate. Induction was faster.
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