Capitol Hill Blue
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/09/us/moderna-vaccine-patent.html
Moderna took Operation Warp Speed money, so no amount of protest from them is valid...the taxpayers and Uncle Sam are major factors that MADE the Funky Cold Moderna POSSIBLE and
for once it is TIME pharmaceutical companies get DENIED the chance to GOUGE end users of a product, the development of which they helped underwrite.

I'd like to see Uncle Sam go back through EVERY SINGLE pharmaceutical patent that has benefited from taxpayer money and correct the record all the way down the line.
My own father won a lawsuit over his invention of the RF permeameter, which drastically improved the performance of every device that ever used ferrite cores for tuning.
That would be RADIO RECEIVERS, like every single one ever made. (after that)

Didn't make him fabulously wealthy but it DID indeed represent a significant improvement in his bank book.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
Just guessing but you probably didnt need any extra-familial help with your math homework, or call someone to repair your TV!

TAT
You are absolutely right! If there was ever an industry that is ripping off everybody in the United States its the pharmacy folks. Our universities develop and the pharmacy folks advertise, lobby, and overcharge for what the universities have invented, often with federal dollars! (I think)
Originally Posted by TatumAH
Just guessing but you probably didnt need any extra-familial help with your math homework, or call someone to repair your TV!

TAT

The biggest tragedy for me is the fact that I did not inherit my father's world renowned math and physics skills.
None of us three Haas boys did, in fact.
It's clear that I inherited whatever smarts I might have from my Mom's side, and they're not scientists, they're creatives...artists, painters, ceramicists, wrought iron workers...

What little I did get brain-wise from "Das Nuke" (my nickname for the old man) is in recognizing patterns and grasping a basic understanding of
how things flow. Beyond that, I only inherited his looks.

As for the TV, at age seven I took the back off our ancient Admiral 17 inch B/W TV set and decided to make my own homemade
"tube tester" out of a cardboard shoe box.
Only trouble was, I didn't notice the vacuum tube diagram inside and when Mom said Dad was home, I hurriedly jammed the tubes any place they fit, and when Das Nuke flicked the switch for Cronkite, instead he got "POOF" followed by acrid smoke and a VERY guilty looking little boy slinking out of the room.
BUSTED.

My "punishment" was I had to spend every day where I wasn't doing homework, helping him build his own Heathkit 25 inch color TV.
Heathkits, for those who don't know, were extremely popular DIY hobby electronics kits, and the TV we built together was top notch and lasted a long time.
And I learned basic electronics, and enough math to grasp the principles, and I learned how to solder properly.
But I could never DESIGN circuits or do advanced troubleshooting, just the basics...enough to earn me a Ham radio license and an FCC Commercial Radio technician's license.
That's it.
Sensing thread drift, I can roll with it! grin I blew my first fuse also around age 6-7 after "fixing" a tube radio, which as you know have dangerous high voltages. What were our parents thinking letting us fool around with lethal risks? Oh yeah, we didnt exactly inform them about our activities, but still they figured it out! ThumbsUp
I didnt just blow one fuse, but took out the whole house electricity, and they noticed. In my defense, I mentioned that it wasnt my fault, as only one fuse should have blown and protected the system. This proved correct, as the wiring was indeed defective, and I got off with time served. It was 1955-6 in New Orleans and electrical codes were a bit lax!
My father was a huge Amateur radio fan. and he and his brother even made their own vacuum tubes during the depression years, including the glass blowing and sealing. My father was always so tickled by being able to talk with people all around the world FOR FREE, except for the thousands spent on equipment and death defying antenna work. I still get flashbacks!
Naturally I had to get licensed too, and although I was fine with theory, Morse Code was my downfall and could never get up to 13 WPM, leaving me stuck with a Technician licence, something you might relate to!

We had lots of Heathkit equipment which was very instructive in electronics. For those who have never p,ut one of those kits together, they come with very complete instructions for every step, including pictures, showing every detail. The first thing you had to do was inventory every part down to each resistor value, and then you started building it. I put together my first stereo to take off to U of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1968, because you needed music for Drug U, and I was broke. I was extreamly carefull in the construction, as the stakes were very high. I finished absolutely everything, but there was one 330 Ohm resistor left over! I retraced the location of every resistor to find my error, knowing if I had one left over, something else was also wrong. All four of them were found in exactly the right locations! My father, when I wasnt looking, had added an extra 330 Ohm resistor to my carefully organized parts kept in muffin tins to keep track of everything! He got me but good, I was frantic till I figured it out, and he was quite pleased with his prank. Did I mention that teasing was standard in the family, and you will probaly be surprised that it purrsisted for my kids! grin
TAT
These days there are virtually any real restrictions or anything you need to know to be a ham operator. You also don't need Morse code anymore. Its kindofa shame. I remember my dad talking to the king Hussian of Jordan. Now, I am told, all you gotta do is get the equipment. I also remember him using his ham phone to call people all over the place when long distance was kinda expensive.

I guess those were the good old days. I also remember when we were walking by the Piggly Wiggly grocery store and a sailor walked up to him, asked him his name, handed him a piece of paper and told him that we had been attacked by japan and the paper was an order to report. Piggly Wiggly is now two restaurants. I was very young and have always found it interesting, especially given my lack of memory, that I have always remembered that day.
Those Heathkit manuals were something else: A paragraph and drawing for every single component! With explicit color codes listed on every resistor and capacitor. (Remember capacitor color codes?)

Well I got you guys beat, hands down: I had an actual neon sign transformer I fooled around with in my bedroom! It put out some ungodly voltage, with enough amps to fry an elephant. I also made a carbon arc furnace that ran on household AC. Fun stuff. I was probably about 10.

In my high school Occupational Electronics class, we had surplus 180 volt B batteries that we used mainly for zapping the crap out of each other. My biggest disappointment with that class was that the teacher was strictly analog, and I designed and built a digital computer that could "learn" and "forget" out of telephone relays. My classmate (who won the school Science Fair) was astonished I didn't win anything. But his single neuron model was analog, and our teacher was the judge for electronic stuff.
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
I also made a carbon arc furnace that ran on household AC.

You could have been a welder in Cuba!

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
All dedicated nerds had carbon arc furnaces. Mine was made from a flowerpot that was easy to drill hole for carbon rods harvested from D cell batteries. The best and most dangerous aspect for some, was the voltage dropping mechanism, consisting of two rocks, holding the 115 VAC mains in series with the carbon rods, immersed in a glass pan filled with salt water. The optimal voltage was obtained by moving the rocks closer or farther apart, or adding moar salt. It's lucky we lived! I suspect some did not, revealing themselves as pseudo-nerds!
TAT

This is what my father used in the sixties, Hallicrafter Loudenboomer Mk2. You can see the glowing massive pentode. He was a big believer in moar power! There was no need to heat the radio shack! You wouldn't survive a shock from the power supply, unlike the Model T spark coils that were popular for pranks in the 60's!

TAT
Originally Posted by TatumAH

This is what my father used in the sixties, Hallicrafter Loudenboomer Mk2. You can see the glowing massive pentode. He was a big believer in moar power! There was no need to heat the radio shack! You wouldn't survive a shock from the power supply, unlike the Model T spark coils that were popular for pranks in the 60's!

TAT

Assuming it's transmitting into a dummy load, because that was an incredibly low SWR reading.
Pentode almost reminds me of an Eimac tube.


That dummy heated up a gallon of mineral oil pretty quickly!
TAT
Quote
Mine was made from a flowerpot that was easy to drill hole for carbon rods harvested from D cell batteries

Exactly my setup. I suspect we both had the same "Boy's Guide to Deadly Fun" book. Glass pan filled with salt water? Yup.

Never once burned or zapped by either the carbon arc or the neon sign transformer. Later in Electronics class, our teacher demonstrated how to tell if a lamp socket had 120 VAC live by sticking your finger in it. And yes, I did it. Not painful if your finger is dry and you are not grounded anywhere. Mr. Deason would have been fired in a minute if stuff he did like that every got out!
pondering_it_all
Quote
Exactly my setup. I suspect we both had the same "Boy's Guide to Deadly Fun" book. Glass pan filled with salt water? Yup.[/quote]

That book, our blue Bible, is still available kid danger book
Except it was Titled: 700 Science Experiments for Everyone Hardcover – January 1, 1958
compiled by UNESCO (Author)
I found my copy but cant quite figure out how to post the reminiscent images of the carbon arc furnace with salt water rheostat. My copy has some interesting stains on it, and a few holes burned into the cover.
Will post them when I figure it out. Had trouble with dropbox.

TAT
Originally Posted by TatumAH


That dummy heated up a gallon of mineral oil pretty quickly!
TAT

Yeah I bet!
PS: Isn't it a shame we stuck with that old 1930's analog TV tech for as long as we did?
Looking at that video, which is admittedly quite a few generations down and already run through some horrible codec, you can still
tell that the moire patterns in that clip originated in the master.
I'm not even sure it would have been avoidable if we'd moved over to PAL, (albeit with 30 fps instead of 25) but it might have been
less pronounced.
The crowd dissolved into "HOLY BEAT FREQUENCY, BATMAN!" ROTFMOL

[Linked Image from cdn.britannica.com]
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
Quote
Mine was made from a flowerpot that was easy to drill hole for carbon rods harvested from D cell batteries

Exactly my setup. I suspect we both had the same "Boy's Guide to Deadly Fun" book. Glass pan filled with salt water? Yup.

Never once burned or zapped by either the carbon arc or the neon sign transformer. Later in Electronics class, our teacher demonstrated how to tell if a lamp socket had 120 VAC live by sticking your finger in it. And yes, I did it. Not painful if your finger is dry and you are not grounded anywhere. Mr. Deason would have been fired in a minute if stuff he did like that every got out!

Did your Science Teacher ever recite any Little Willie limericks, like

Little Willie was a chemist,
Little Willie is no more.
What Willie thought was H20
Was H2SO4
Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
Originally Posted by TatumAH


That dummy heated up a gallon of mineral oil pretty quickly!
TAT

Yeah I bet!
PS: Isn't it a shame we stuck with that old 1930's analog TV tech for as long as we did?
Looking at that video, which is admittedly quite a few generations down and already run through some horrible codec, you can still
tell that the moire patterns in that clip originated in the master.
I'm not even sure it would have been avoidable if we'd moved over to PAL, (albeit with 30 fps instead of 25) but it might have been
less pronounced.
The crowd dissolved into "HOLY BEAT FREQUENCY, BATMAN!" ROTFMOL

[Linked Image from cdn.britannica.com]

Was the Beat Frequency Mastered? rolleyes
TAT
Yes Indeed, but I didnt have a real science teacher until 7th grade, and by then safety instruction was pretty much too little too late! You learn lots more in the lab from experience than instruction, like hot glass and hot steel look pretty much like cold glass and steel.
We were more visual in our chemical humour, but my high school chem teacher did ponder a bit when I asked him what was H2O4, and groaned when the answer was to drink!
Chemical naming quiz

The blue book does have scattered safety hints strategically placed. It suggests that for the salt water 120V rheostat, you should use a glass or ceramic dish, not metal! Also, while using the carbon arc, the use of sunglasses is advisable. I have never seen an arc that was safely viewed through sunglasses, and most of us didnt have welding goggles back then. We used heavily smoked glasses, like you could use to view the eclipse that starts here around 1 here EST and peaks around 4! Dont look directly at it, because your cataracts from carbon arc use will obscure the details! mad

Mr Barr, if you're still out there, my parents did not appreciate your sarcasm when you suggested that for a particular experiment we should use our parents best china, but at least I seemed to have taken the sarchasm to heart and long term memory.
TAT
"Lab experience"

Funny, I never took chemistry in high school. (I did actually have a radiation biology class, though.) A lot of my science was self-taught. Still aced the ACT and was offered honors classes when I started college. Loved all my chemistry classes.
Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
"Lab experience"

Funny, I never took chemistry in high school. (I did actually have a radiation biology class, though.) A lot of my science was self-taught. Still aced the ACT and was offered honors classes when I started college. Loved all my chemistry classes.

A radiation biology class?
You mean, like "weapons effects" ?
My Dad's specialty.

So you know that getting too big a dose in too short a time period tends to do bad things to your bladder and kidneys, yes?
Radiation Biology was a lab class where we used radioactive tracers that were commonly used in biology. We studied radioactive decay, safety, waste handling, types of commonly used tracers, scintillation, and such.

Our final big experiment had us feeding a rat a little P32, euthanizing it, freezing it solid, and then cutting it in half length-wise so we could put it on some film plates. After a day in the freezer, you develop that film, and you can see where all the phosphorous goes. (Mostly to the teeth, which are always growing.)

No weapons stuff. All things we would use as lab techs in our future careers. And after I got tired of asking "Do you want fries with that?" I got a job as a Lab Helper I, at the UCSD medical center research facility. Much cooler stuff than McDonald's, but no free lunch.
But nuclear power should be used to produce electricity no? I think it is a fine and dandy source of electrical power (also to produce hydrogen) yet there are forces that don’t like it. I think if humanity does not embrace nuclear power as a source of electricity they (we) are doomed. Of course there is always the alternative of halving our population by half.

That might help.
Fusion yes, fission NO!
Originally Posted by Ujest Shurly
Fusion yes, fission NO!
Why is confusion a thing but confission isn’t? I’m confuddled…
Originally Posted by logtroll
Originally Posted by Ujest Shurly
Fusion yes, fission NO!
Why is confusion a thing but confission isn’t? I’m confuddled…
Confission? You just had to ask, didn't ya?

Consider yourself defuddled!

TAT
Originally Posted by Ken Condon
But nuclear power should be used to produce electricity no? I think it is a fine and dandy source of electrical power (also to produce hydrogen) yet there are forces that don’t like it. I think if humanity does not embrace nuclear power as a source of electricity they (we) are doomed. Of course there is always the alternative of halving our population by half.

That might help.

Thorium.
It isn't your grandpa's nuclear power.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]
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