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#332178 02/10/21 07:09 PM
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jgw Offline OP
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62% of bankruptcies in the USA are due to medical bills. Almost 4/5th of these people had health insurance but went bankrupted anyway because of co-payments, deductibles and uncovered services. Others got so sick that they lost their job and then lost their insurance.
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/06/05/bankruptcy.medical.bills/

Best healthcare in the world my *ss.

Last edited by jgw; 02/10/21 07:10 PM.
jgw #332182 02/10/21 11:32 PM
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Better health care than most countries, if you are White, employed, smart enough to actually get real health insurance, and lucky.

Great health care if you are rich and powerful: They even send a helicopter to get you to Walter Reed, so you don't get stuck in traffic, then pump you full of new treatments that have not been approved by the FDA outside of clinical trials.

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I have medicare, medigap, and the VA so I am dandy. I think the pandemic has pretty much demonstrated that, for the richest country in the world, pretty bad healthcare. Hell, both Canada and Mexico do better than we do. I think the Mexican system costs something like 35.00 a year. On the other hand the United States is, pretty much single handed, support most healthcare tourism operations in the world (Mexico, Thailand, India, etc) One interesting thing about the Indian operation is that the doctors who own that one were all educated in the United States!

A story. Several years ago we were in Mexico (Guadalajara) and we were shopping,. My wife was talking to the girl working there and then said to her: "What part of Texas are you from". The girl just kinda stared at her for a bit and then said; "Why would you say that?" and my wife replied; "Because you are speaking Mexican with a Texas accent". The girl smiled and said a town in Mexico (forget which). Then they started talking. The Girl was attending medical school in Mexico and then planned to go back to the states to practice. We checked later and there are a LOT of kids down there going to medical schools. Same is true in Cuba which also supplies a lot of doctors to America. You gotta have a lot of money, or big debt, to be trained in America but, apparently, you can get the same training a lot cheaper some place else.

jgw #332207 02/12/21 02:11 AM
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Originally Posted By: jgw
to be trained in America but, apparently, you can get the same training a lot cheaper some place else.


I would argue with getting "the same training" as in America. Cuba schools emphasize public health and the diagnosis and treatment with the limited advanced support of labs and diagnostic instrumentation, as is often the case in undeserved rural practices. This is cost effective, and after all most thing that need treatment are not very complicated. This is not well matched to practice in America, for better or worse. I see lots of internests with sub-specialties that dont know how to look into an eye, or know what end of a stethoscope to look into. Physicians trained without lots of echos, MRIs, etc know how to do excellent physical exams, because often that was all they had to work with.

There is considerable variability among American schools, and some specialize in training cookies, as opposed to training the next generation of Academic physicians, or cookie cutter schools.

To get licensed in America you have to pass Board Exams, and FMGs (foreign medical graduates) have a harder time passing them. Frankly the exams are a very low hurdle and only about 3% of American grads fail. Do you know what they call the very bottom of the classes and are just above the 3% fail percentile, the second time they take the exams?
Yep! Doctor!

TAT


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jgw #332232 02/12/21 10:05 PM
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Not exactly on topic, but somewhat illustrative:

My wife's Vet School class was filled with people who never got a B in their high school or undergraduate classes. They were so driven to perfection, that more than one dropped out when they did get their first B! And these were people who were aiming to be Vets, not MDs. Very much a lower paid profession.

My wife never even picked up her grades, or checked her ranking in the class. She sat for her board exams, and passed the first time. But she did have a great advantage over most of her classmates: I came to visit about once a month for the weekend. The rest of the time she lived a quite monastic life of classes, study, sleep, eat, and a daily walk. No need to spend time socializing, dating, drinking, etc.

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Originally Posted By: pondering_it_all
The rest of the time she lived a quite monastic life of classes, study, sleep, eat, and a daily walk. No need to spend time socializing, dating, drinking, etc.
Yeah Right ROTFMOL She sees a wild and crazy guy 2 days/nights a month and then goes back into the nunnery??! ROTFMOL
Let me tell you that a whole lot of "socializing" happens in Med or Vet school, when you are trapped with a hundred other students for 45 hrs a week! Plenty of time for a little daily walk on the wild side, as these students are excellent in "time management", read quickie grin And, who says you cant drink alone, not like its hard to find another drinking "buddy", particularly after exams, unless your visits were carefully scheduled around the exam schedule! Predictability also facilitates apartment cleanups and destruction of evidence.
Makes a good story though grin


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Bad, bad Kitty!


You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.
R. Buckminster Fuller
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I get that a lot, for no apparent reason! grin


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jgw Offline OP
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I agree, I didn't explain very well. "same training" was wrong. People coming from foreign schools tend to perform, in medical boarfd exams, approximately 10% less than those trained in the United States. Apparently, however, if you can pass the tests you are ready to setup practice.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Medical_Licensing_Examination

jgw #332257 02/13/21 10:58 PM
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I lived with my wife for 10 years before she went to vet school, so I know what she likes and doesn't like VERY well. She's pathologically shy of other men, never gets drunk, never goes to bars, on and on. Practically Amish. And having sexy-times once a month was fine with her after 10 years of being together. She was 32 when she entered vet school, not 22.

Passing board exams in vet school or med school, technically lets you go setup a general practice. Almost nobody does that now. They all either go to work for an established general practice, or get into a residency program if they can, so they can get board certified for specialties. Typically they don't have the million dollars needed to go independent.

Often the top of the class will go on and get a PhD and go into academia. My wife apprenticed in a well-established small animal practice for a couple of years, and then entered a pathology program at Purdue. She was far freer than most of her classmates because she had no debt.

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