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Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
Originally Posted by Greger
Too many people using water unwisely.

To wit:

Growing almonds
Watering lawns to the point where they look like Kentucky
Failing to recognize the role of biomass as Loggy pointed out.

That's just three but they might be the top three.

Absolutely! The best solutions, IMHO, have to be on the front end. Shut down the swimming pools, the golf courses, the fountains. Stop growing any crop that can’t be grown with a measurable amount of water - and if that means we go back to eating produce when it’s in season rather than watering it year round, that’s fine.

Regarding desalinization - there was a lot of talk about building a desal plant on the Colorado where I lived 20 years ago. I moved so I’m not sure what happened, but it got a lot of pushback back then. I hope it’s financially more feasible now.

One other note: for a long time, we’ve been using so much of the Colorado River water that we’ve been unable to pay our water debt to Mexico. We also need to be aware of impact on the Grand Canyon - failing to do that is how we lost Glen Canyon.

Oldie but a goodie: Marc Reisner’s ”Cadillac Desert:The American west and its Disappearing Water.”


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Originally Posted by Mellowicious
Originally Posted by Jeffery J. Haas
Originally Posted by Greger
Too many people using water unwisely.

To wit:

Growing almonds
Watering lawns to the point where they look like Kentucky
Failing to recognize the role of biomass as Loggy pointed out.

That's just three but they might be the top three.

Absolutely! The best solutions, IMHO, have to be on the front end. Shut down the swimming pools, the golf courses, the fountains. Stop growing any crop that can’t be grown with a measurable amount of water - and if that means we go back to eating produce when it’s in season rather than watering it year round, that’s fine.

Regarding desalinization - there was a lot of talk about building a desal plant on the Colorado where I lived 20 years ago. I moved so I’m not sure what happened, but it got a lot of pushback back then. I hope it’s financially more feasible now.

One other note: for a long time, we’ve been using so much of the Colorado River water that we’ve been unable to pay our water debt to Mexico. We also need to be aware of impact on the Grand Canyon - failing to do that is how we lost Glen Canyon.

Oldie but a goodie: Marc Reisner’s ”Cadillac Desert:The American west and its Disappearing Water.”

It drives me batty to see people dutifully watering the crap out of their lawns in Southern California while we literally turn into the Dust Bowl.
Agree wholeheartedly...if you want the lawn to look like Kentucky by cracky please MOVE TO Kentucky.


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Turn of the water to the golf courses first. We have an unbelievable number of them in Southern California. I think golf should be done in places that are self-watering, like the old courses in Scotland. We even have Municipal Courses, where the taxpayers subsidize the watering! Then stop subsidizing agriculture with artificially low water rates. If farmers, pool owners, etc, can afford to pay the same water rates as everybody else, let them. Poor people will not have pools, or vast green lawns, so their rates will be low. Almonds and rice will be a bit more expensive and tend to be imported from places that have more water. Maybe that will move North, as climates shift. Trying to keep everything like it was before climate change is just too unsustainable.


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A lot of the produce grown in California depends in some way on imported waters, and the aquifers aren’t refilling fast enough if at all. It’s not just almonds and rice. 1/4 of the food in this country comes from the Central Valley, and it’s almost 20% of the irrigated land in the country. Things are going to change whether we prepare for it or not.

And shut off that XxxxxFountain in Las Vegas - complete waste presented as a Good Thing.

Last edited by Mellowicious; 08/19/21 03:41 PM.

Julia
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Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
Turn of the water to the golf courses first. We have an unbelievable number of them in Southern California. I think golf should be done in places that are self-watering, like the old courses in Scotland. We even have Municipal Courses, where the taxpayers subsidize the watering! Then stop subsidizing agriculture with artificially low water rates. If farmers, pool owners, etc, can afford to pay the same water rates as everybody else, let them. Poor people will not have pools, or vast green lawns, so their rates will be low. Almonds and rice will be a bit more expensive and tend to be imported from places that have more water. Maybe that will move North, as climates shift. Trying to keep everything like it was before climate change is just too unsustainable.

Ever see that Howard Hughes movie "The Aviator?"
The scene with Howard and Katherine Hepburn is historically accurate.
They used to just dye the brown grass "green" back in the Twenties and Thirties.

[Linked Image from i1.wp.com]

There wasn't enough water until Colonel Mulholland figured out how to bring it to "Los ANGG-ell-ees"


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The movie “Chinatown” has some truth to it as well.


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Originally Posted by Mellowicious
The movie “Chinatown” has some truth to it as well.

Absolutely it does.
Chinatown was based largely on accounts of Mulholland and the Water Wars in L.A. County, "The Two Jakes" was based on similar scandals in the oil and gas industry and there was SUPPOSED to be a third and final installment, a sequel that dealt with how L.A. lost its urban commuter rail system, but that project got canned and instead it found new life in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit".


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You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.
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Interesting. I’m not sure how agave for farming will be able to surpass agave for the liquor industry but let’s hope. And let’s hope, if the project is successful, agave doesn’t get turned into a monoculture itself. Nice video; thanks.


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Here is an interesting page about water supply and use in California:

Water is life. It's also a battle.

California imports zero water for Central Valley agriculture. That all comes from the Sierras. The Colorado River Aqueduct swings South, and comes into San Bernardino South of the mountains. It ends at the Metropolitan Water District, which supplies water for the greater LA and San Diego areas. LA also gets a lot of it's water from the Eastern Sierra. That's the system Mullholland built. MWD also gets some water pumped South from the Sacramento River Delta. So getting less water from the Colorado River will not directly affect Central Valley agriculture, unless MWD gets more of "their" water pumped South. (That's actually more expensive than desalination!)

The big problem for Central Valley ag is low rain and snowpack in the Sierras. We do "import" a little bit of water in far Northern California, but that's just the natural flow of the Klamath River. Actually, you could even say we don't "import" Colorado River water, since the Western shore is in California for about 195 miles. Every drop of water Southern California desalinates, cuts the amount we need to take from the Colorado River. That page I quoted lists the cost of desalination versus transportation (and everything else). They say desalination costs 40% more than water transportation, but desalination probably includes the profit the desalination company makes, and water transportation is heavily subsidized by cheap electricity rates. When I compared the number of MWhrs of electricity used for transporting water from the Colorado River per acre foot, to the amount the desal plant uses per acre foot, they were about the same.


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