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RoundTable For Fall 2021
by Ken Condon - 12/04/21 07:19 AM
A Musical Quiz
by Ken Condon - 12/04/21 03:46 AM
What's for dinner?
by pondering_it_all - 12/04/21 02:39 AM
lying on the internet
by pondering_it_all - 12/04/21 02:16 AM
Winning
by perotista - 12/04/21 12:50 AM
... doubt is our product...
by chunkstyle - 12/03/21 05:09 PM
Denialism
by Greger - 12/03/21 03:37 PM
Coronavirus: The Plague of The 21st Century?
by pondering_it_all - 12/01/21 08:51 PM
I’ll Buy That
by Greger - 12/01/21 07:22 PM
Boundaries for Facebook
by jgw - 11/30/21 06:26 PM
Pacific Northwest Weather
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A Fungus Amungus
by logtroll - 11/28/21 01:25 PM
Republicans promise brutal revenge in 2022
by pdx rick - 11/27/21 08:45 PM
masks and vaccinations
by logtroll - 11/27/21 01:36 PM
Vigilantism - why isn’t it illegal?
by logtroll - 11/25/21 11:46 PM
"Mom, I think it's a boy."
by TatumAH - 11/25/21 04:37 AM
Gerrymandering
by perotista - 11/23/21 10:17 PM
You don't know beans! vs Killer Beans
by TatumAH - 11/23/21 08:37 PM
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Carpal Tunnel
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Reckon you'll hafta get off your ass and actually pull the weeds.

I'm going to suggest that the use of herbicides is what led to the unprecedented fungal invasion and that it is every weed's job to survive.


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I solved the weed situation, it was just a matter of perspective. I weed is only a weed if I dont want it growing there! I embrace all enthusiastic plants, and they are all welcome in my veggie beds, lawn, front and back yards, side yard, but sadly no longer growing through the asphalt of my driveway. One of my chronic interests is noticing some plant thriving in my yard, and finding it the right place to grow best. They have to be shade tolerant and deer resistant, or they wouldn't have made the cut in the yard.

The white goosefoot/ pigweed was taste tested today. It is a seed rather than a grain and was pleasant like Keenwaaw without the soapy aftertast

Getting back to culture, the microbial culture world has had intense competition between the fungi and filamentous bacteria for Billions of years, which I understand is not as impressive as we are now in Trillions mindset. If one was better than the other, we would have only one kind that won the evolution battle. We now understand that these many organisms work together as the bacteria need fungi to convert cellulose and other complex carbohydrate into simple sugars. So, what could go wrong with such a long lasting mutually productive system that also nurtures plants to help utilize soil nutrients. You guessed it Roundup/glyphosate.

It is now clear that glyphosate that poisons plants, for now, but also kills many bacteria and fungi in to soil and could also change our bowel biomes if roundup got into our food supply. Roundup is also more persistent in soil, than we were led to believe by Monsanto. The following study shows the effects on fungal mycorrhizal networks! NO NOT THAT!

I just started a new compost heap today with sudden abundance of leaves. It still feels like summer here so Im expecting a rapid heating pile, not like Im trying to kill the seeds of the highly invasive Creeping Charlie.
Its exciting to watch compost forming, once you understand the fascinating process!
Its even more exciting when you compost relatives, like some have mentioned!

roundup ruins fungi, Glyphosate decreases mycorrhizal colonization and affects plant-soil feedback
TAT

Last edited by TatumAH; 10/15/21 03:20 AM. Reason: furrgot the lynx

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The thing I have always found amazing about a well-formed compost heap is how hot it gets in the middle. The first one I ever made as an older teen blew my mind. I had read about them heating up, but fungi and bacteria producing that much heat was incredible.


We're flying electric helicopters on Mars yet you can't turn on your clothes dryer in Texas. That's because scientists are in charge of Mars, and Republicans are in charge of Texas.
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It’s nice to see there is a Microbe World Fan Club in these parts. Does that mean support for the concept of trying to get human culture (which is analagous to glyphosate culture) to emulate Fungi Culture?


You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.
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Originally Posted by pondering_it_all
…but fungi and bacteria producing that much heat was incredible.
The thermophilic phase of a compost pile is driven by bacteria, which are basically “burning” the organic material in the process of breaking it down. The heat is not friendly to fungi and hyphae development. Johnson-Su fungal dominant compost is a slow static pile process that doesn’t have much of a heat producing stage, yet in a year the material (mostly woody biomass) is converted to a soil with the consistency of worm castings, and is unbelievably rich in microbial diversity. It can even break down organic chemicals like glyphosate. As Dr. Johnson is fond of saying, in regards to the ability of microbes to create a healthy and stable soil environment, “There’s a bug that will eat anything!”

Humans need to appreciate and learn from Nature’s genius and stop trying to dominate it stupidly and destructively.


You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
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Originally Posted by Greger
American "culture" is not just about money and greed. Hatred also plays an enormous role.
I just thought of another major element that dominates and controls human culture - cars.

What would our culture look like without cars? I think our future with cars is extinction.


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Offering a couple of links as, well, compost for ideas. Not for or against, just providing them. Don’t know anything about the museum but thought it might be relevant.



https://folkartmuseum.org

https://www.livescience.com/28945-american-culture.html

Last edited by Mellowicious; 10/15/21 03:03 PM.

Julia
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There was a Southern Apartheid Culture that I was raised in...it left me a bit scarred.

There were good and beautiful things about that culture but keeping the blacks in gulags and using them as a source of cheap labor kind of soured the whole thing.

That culture...a remnant of the Great Depression, needed to be swept away and was. But there are vestiges of it remaining. Some not so bad.

In my little town, it's time for Pig On The Pond! A 3-day barbecue festival. They've set up a midway in Waterfront Park, fair rides and cotton candy and there's about 5 acres of food trucks and competition barbecue rigs. Several hundred thousand people are going to be partying amid the smell of roasting pork over the next few days just down the hill from me.

Roscoe and I will be walking to Victory Point and maybe beyond for the next few days, we've never been to the bridge and there's a dog park just beyond that we've never seen...

But this is American Culture as much as anything. Food, music, and fun. People gathering and feasting and playing together, my town is incredibly diverse so there will be a mix of dozens of different races and nationalities. Dozens of different religions and beliefs, dozens of different cultures., and nobody there is gonna give a rat's ass about any of the differences.

A little melting pot down the hill from me. A little slice of Americana.


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Originally Posted by Greger
That culture...a remnant of the Great Depression, needed to be swept away and was. But there are vestiges of it remaining. Some not so bad.

My knowledge of the Depression is more Midwestern/western.

I’ve never heard that association with the Depression. Racism was everywhere in the country, but I’ve never heard of the Depression as a cause. Can you give me a little more context?


Julia
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I like this thread; it’s giving me something to think about.

One aspect of our culture that no one has mentioned is militarism. It’s certainly an American feature (for lack of a better phrase) that is recognizable to much of the rest of the world.

Also one of many contradictions: the European-based population brought with them the urge to move on whenever things looked better elsewhere - one of the earlier posts referred to a lack of attachment to the land. On the other hand, once immigrants put down roots (or thought they had), they tended to stay there as long as possible. That’s why there are four and five generation farms. lot of the land and as mentioned earlier, A fierce independence.

Finally (for now,) another contradiction (and another European-based element.) While wanting to “melting pot” their way into American (Anglo) society, immigrants have also tried to keep something of the Old Country in their lives - often through food and festivals. Some of them are largely made up (St. Patrick’s Day, Cinco de Mayo,) but in other cases, Polish festivals, Danish/Norwegian festivals, Czech festivals, Carnivals - these are found across the nation. How else would we know about lutefisk? So while we move away as fast as we can we try very hard to bring a piece of it with us.

Maybe I’d say our culture is wholly contradictory.

And armed.


Julia
“It’s the shipwreck that leads you to the magical island.”
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