Where Redistricting Stands in 14 States (NYT, Subscription) Because this is a subscription source, I will give the highlights:

Quote
Redistricting is happening in every state, even those with only one congressional district, because state legislative maps have to be redrawn, too. But we’ll focus here on congressional maps in some of the states whose choices will shape the battle for control of the House next year. (Some other states — including Texas, which is gaining two seats and could be a gold mine for Republicans — are too early in the process to report anything meaningful, but watch this space.)

Under each state, we’ve indicated the possible shift in partisan power. But remember, there’s still plenty of time for proposals to change.

Colorado +1D Net 1 D
Democrats may gain one seat

Georgia +1R Net 0
Republicans may gain one seat

Illinois +1D; -2R Net 3 D
Democrats may gain one seat; Republicans may lose two

Indiana
Republicans may protect one competitive seat

Iowa (EVEN)
Democrats may gain one seat ("But the Republican-led state legislature may reject the map because it would give Democrats — who hold one of Iowa’s four House seats — a good chance of winning two seats. (That said, it would also effectively cap Democrats at two seats, preventing them from holding three as they did in 2019 and 2020.)")

Maryland +1D Net 4 D
Democrats may gain one seat. Or Republicans might (but probably not).

Missouri (EVEN)
Republicans may protect one competitive seat

Nebraska (EVEN)
Republicans may protect one competitive seat (Tied to that, may make the split that occurred in the Electoral College unlikely)

New Hampshire +1R Net 3 D
Republicans may gain one seat

New Mexico +1D Net 4 D
Democrats may gain one seat

New York +4/5 D Net 8 D
Democrats may gain four or five seats

Oregon (EVEN)
It’s wide open

South Carolina (EVEN)
Republicans may protect one competitive seat

Tennessee +1 R Net 7 D
Republicans may gain one seat

Now, it's early days, and some aggressive States (Texas, Wisconsin, South Carolina) have not weighed in. The end result, however, may not be as dire as often predicted. Red seats will become redder, and blue seats will become rarer.


A well reasoned argument is like a diamond: impervious to corruption and crystal clear - and infinitely rarer.

Here, as elsewhere, people are outraged at what feels like a rigged game -- an economy that won't respond, a democracy that won't listen, and a financial sector that holds all the cards. - Robert Reich